"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Menu Planning > Today's Menu
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-12-2006, 06:58 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: MN
Posts: 14
Cool Cooking class / demo for kids. Any suggestions?

The company I work for provides close to 1000 day care meals per day. One of our largest clients is looking for me to do a hands on cooking demo / class for the children. The ages are from pre school to, 12 to 13 year olds. They would prefer the content be teaching actual technique for producing real edible food to develop self sufficiency skills. I have done some Chefs Tables and a couple of fun interactive dinners with adults but never anything with children. Any suggestions?? Thanks
JIM

jim nehmzow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2006, 07:08 AM   #2
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,518
Kids like to get their hands dirty and really play with their food. How about something with meatballs so they could get their hands in there and mix things up. Most kids love spaghetti and meatballs. Making bread might be another good one.

Where will this demo be taking place. What tols and equipment will you have available to use?
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2006, 08:10 AM   #3
Executive Chef
 
marmalady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,SouthCarolina
Posts: 2,642
Jim, I used to assist at a cooking school that taught tons of kids' classes. I'd be happy to share some of the great, fun, simple recipes we put together for the kids.

I have the same questions as GB, but also would like to ask if you have an age range, or will it be all ages? Will it be 'hands-on' or demo only?
marmalady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2006, 08:47 AM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: MN
Posts: 14
GB & Marmalady, Thanks for responding to my post. I am going to have my first meeting with the contact next week to sort out what venue I will have to use, ages and other info. If it is in a kitchen that is great. The ages are from pre schoolers to 11 & 12 year olds. The group sizes will vary but are around 12 children per group. They do want it to be a hands on make and eat type demonstration from what I have been told. I will update the post after I have my meeting.
Thanks JIM
jim nehmzow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2006, 08:51 AM   #5
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,518
Here are things that come to mind...

Pizza
Calzones
Spaghetti with meatballs
Hamburgers
Meatloaf
Tacos
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2006, 10:13 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Key West FL
Posts: 253
I would make them do simple things that they will be able to make often at home. When I used to babysit I would often have the kids help me make macaroni and cheese, they always liked that.
biev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 09:58 AM   #7
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 106
Send a message via Yahoo to Quizzie
Hotdogs is an easy hands on. Any kind of cookies. MAC and Chesse is a good idea (biev). Grilled cheese sandwiches is also a fav of kids.

Good luck Jim sounds like fun.
Quizzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 10:59 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Don't forget to bake some cookies!
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 11:51 AM   #9
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,959
Another great meal for kids is canned pork and beans, with some type of pre-cooked sausage such as kielbasa, or hot dogs, bratwurst, etc. They can just slice the sausage and warm with the beans. And the beans are highly nutritious too. Throw together a green salad with some tomato, cucumber, and a raspberry vinigairette and you have a ballanced meal.

Another great meal that's easy and yummy for kids is to cut and core 2 apples, a pear, peal and cut up a carrot into four chunks, add a can of pineapple (in its own juice) a cup of apple juice, and a brick of silken tofu. Trow it all into a blender and blend until smooth. This has been a favorite around my house for years. You can even add a banana or two to make it creamier, plus some cinnamon for flavor and to help control spiking blood sugars.

Three bean salad is quick and easy. Just open one can each of kidney beans, green beans, and and other bean you like. Garbanso, great northern white, pinto, black beans, etc., are great for that third bean. Dump them into a bowl, with the can liquid, add vinager, dill weed, celery seed, vinager, and sugar to taste.

And healthy sandwiches, don't even get me started.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 02:52 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,970
One thing I loved as a kid was real participation meals ... fondue, sukiyaki, etc. Something where the cooker goes in the middle of the table, and you can actually see your food go immediately from something raw to something cooked and ready to eat. Another fun thing is to buy some rice paper and make summer rolls.

When I was a kid that age, I was already fixing real meals. The above are just fun and kind of give them the science of cooking. A big help has always been an electric skillet. It is easier to control than stove-top cooking, and can be placed at any level (height wise). The aforementioned sukiyaki is made in an electric skillet.

If the point is to teach them life skills, things like tostadas and dressing up prepared foods are good for a dose of reality. Teaching how to take a can or frozen product and make it into a good, healthy meal.

My nephew loved, absolutely loved, to make pasta, as did the children of many of our freinds. It was simple and they were astonished that they could actually make a noodle all by themselves.

I'm all for cheating ... how about healthy pizzas made with pre-made crusts? Show them how healthy ingredients can taste as good as the junk food. THis could include a knife lesson.

I think my first coooking lessons were things like chili and spaghetti sauce.
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 04:08 PM   #11
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,959
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire
... I think my first coooking lessons were things like chili and spaghetti sauce.
The first things I learned to cook were bacon, fried eggs (basted with the bacon grease), and pancakes. After that came grilled cheese. And then, the lessons that taught me about things not to make, such as fried sardines.

The point of this is that it is just as important to teach that some things should only be done with an adult present, such as frying anything in hot oil, or cooking things that require moving pans of boiling water to the sink, things that could potentially cause serious injury (and that includes improper use of cutting tools).

And I thought of the thing that taught my youngest daughter (not 20 years of age) about getting flavors ballanced. She would open cans of veggies and mix them together in a pot, add seasonings, and create her own soups. And though they came from mixed cans, juice intact, they tasted pretty good.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 04:12 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim nehmzow
The company I work for provides close to 1000 day care meals per day. One of our largest clients is looking for me to do a hands on cooking demo / class for the children. The ages are from pre school to, 12 to 13 year olds. They would prefer the content be teaching actual technique for producing real edible food to develop self sufficiency skills. I have done some Chefs Tables and a couple of fun interactive dinners with adults but never anything with children. Any suggestions?? Thanks
JIM
Welcome to DC, Jim.

Kudos to you for providing 1000 day care meals a day. Perhaps the recipes you use for day care can be translated for kids to prepare in easy terms.

I would concentrate on healthy wholesome foods like chicken, salads, fruits and veggies, fish, healthy pasta dishes, etc. IMO edible food & self sufficiency need not include pizza, meatloaf, spaghetti & meatballs. Sets up a bad example of bad eating habits.

Take them on a field trip to a Farmers' market or a supermarket and give them a budget to spend for a typical family meal & give advice about home cooked healthy meals.

Ask them what their favorite meals are, & do a healthy recipe makeover, i.e. hot dogs, hamburgers and fries.
mish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2006, 02:20 AM   #13
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Key West FL
Posts: 253
No offense, but I wouldn't go with fish as a majority of kids don't like it. I would use vegetables that most kids are familiar with (green beans, carrots) and leave out things like, say, asparagus. It's not so hard to make healthy versions of what the kids like to eat best. There's nothing wrong with eating meatloaf if there's rice and veggies on the place, or spaghetti with a salad, you know? My point is if you teach them to cook with ingredients that aren't part of their regular eating habits, there's little chance that those will end up in their fridge at home.

Ooh! I have another suggestion. I think all kids should know how to make pancakes!
biev is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.