Should I replace my chipped roasting pan lid?

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BAPyessir6

Senior Cook
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Prior Lake
I accidentally bumped my granite roaster today. It fell and chipped the edge of the lid of the roaster. The pan itself is fine. I got from my grandma about 5 years back. It looks like this, just with a small chip in the edge of the lid where it rests against the pan. I'm wondering if it's safe to use or should I replace it. I can provide pictures if necessary.
 

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I would be afraid that the chip would get bigger and I might not notice a small piece of enamel that fell into food. I think it would be easy to get a replacement lid. That looks like pretty standard granite ware.
 
I don't know anything about Granite Ware, but my Le Creuset porcelain enameled cast iron has chips in it around the lips, and I don't worry about it.

If there are sharp edges you could cut your finger on when washing it, you might want to use a little sandpaper to smooth them out, but I wouldn't worry about cooking with it.

CD
 
I don't know anything about Granite Ware, but my Le Creuset porcelain enameled cast iron has chips in it around the lips, and I don't worry about it.

If there are sharp edges you could cut your finger on when washing it, you might want to use a little sandpaper to smooth them out, but I wouldn't worry about cooking with it.

CD
I think the enamel on Le Creuset is thicker. I certainly use my chipped Copco enamelled cast iron. What's left doesn't seem as loose as when Granite Ware chips.

I have certainly used Granite Ware with chips, but the chips are in on the outside, where more chipping from the original spot wouldn't likely fall into food. Sometimes, with a chip in granite ware, you can see that the enamel next to the chip is a bit looser than it should be.
 
I think the enamel on Le Creuset is thicker. I certainly use my chipped Copco enamelled cast iron. What's left doesn't seem as loose as when Granite Ware chips.

I have certainly used Granite Ware with chips, but the chips are in on the outside, where more chipping from the original spot wouldn't likely fall into food. Sometimes, with a chip in granite ware, you can see that the enamel next to the chip is a bit looser than it should be.

I had never even heard of Granite Ware. It sounds rather fragile.

CD
 
I had never even heard of Granite Ware. It sounds rather fragile.

CD
It is more fragile that cast iron with enamel. If you have a broiler pan that came with your oven, it's a high probability that it's Graniteware. Like this picture, but usually in blue with lots of irregular white spots.

41446-6.jpg


If not, you may have seen some Graniteware at your grandma's house. You also see it on large, water bath canners.

Here's a picture of some Graniteware with the most common finish/pattern. That is supposed to be dark blue.

granite-ware-covered-oval-roasting-pan.jpg
 
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It is more fragile that cast iron with enamel. If you have a broiler pan that came with your oven, it's a high probability that it's Graniteware. Like this picture, but usually in blue with lots of irregular white spots.

41446-6.jpg


If not, you may have seen some Graniteware at your grandma's house. You also see it on large, water bath canners.

Here's a picture of some Graniteware with the most common finish/pattern. That is supposed to be dark blue.

granite-ware-covered-oval-roasting-pan.jpg

Ah, my broiler pan from my oven is like that. I've never used it (in 23 years). I also have seen the blue version in camping gear in stores.

My experience using my broiler is, "Almost there, almost there, almost their... burnt."

CD
 
Ah, my broiler pan from my oven is like that. I've never used it (in 23 years). I also have seen the blue version in camping gear in stores.

My experience using my broiler is, "Almost there, almost there, almost their... burnt."

CD
I'm surprised you've never seen a roasting pan like that. My grandmother had one just like it and so did my mother. I, however, opted for a stainless steel one with a rack included.

Cuisinart-7117-16UR-Chef%27s-Classic-Stainless-16-Inch-Rectangular-Roaster-with-Rack.jpg

Concerning the broiler pan that came with your oven, I use mine to bake a meatloaf. I form the meatloaf in a bread pan, then turn it out onto the broiler pan. All the fat drains through, while your meatloaf sits high and dry.
 
I don't think I would worry about breaking a seal. These pans were not designed to create a seal, merely return steam liquid and flavours back down into the pan.
 
Ah, my broiler pan from my oven is like that. I've never used it (in 23 years). I also have seen the blue version in camping gear in stores.

My experience using my broiler is, "Almost there, almost there, almost their... burnt."

CD
So, you can give that broiler pan a feel. You will notice the difference between that sort of pan and Le Creuset immediately.
 
I have one of those blue speckled ones but haven’t used it in 30 years….

If the lid chipped I’d still use it. Also if you are roasting something you don’t need a lid.

For roasting I use an All Clad stainless roasting pan like the one Sir Loin posted.
 
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