Thick or Thin Burger Patties???

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You guys are the ones who messed up the whole bacon thing by calling pork loin Canadian bacon..we eat regular bacon just like you do. Do they order French fries in France? Or do the Greeks as for Greek salad in Athens??:LOL:
Why, I oughta!.....

You know what Texas toast is in Texas?

Toast. :LOL:

CD
 

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Ground chuck is the American burger standard meat. You want 80/20 meat to fat ratio. No leaner than that.

Some people use ground sirloin, which tastes good, but isn't as moist. Other people mix ground chuck and other ground beef cuts, like brisket.

Personally, I use 80/20 ground chuck. It tastes good, and it makes a really juicy burger.

CD

My dad, who was a butcher, swore by a mix of brisket and chuck. I definitely think chuck has to be at least part of the mix, but I'm not super fussy about what makes up the rest, other than I'm not a big fan of round. Round is pretty much flavorless, as far as I'm concerned.

Also, when I buy a whole ribeye or tenderloin at Costco, I take whatever scraps and trimmings are left and put them in a Ziploc to freeze. That goes into my burger (or meatloaf) blend, too.
 
You guys are the ones who messed up the whole bacon thing by calling pork loin Canadian bacon..we eat regular bacon just like you do. Do they order French fries in France? Or do the Greeks as for Greek salad in Athens??:LOL:
Why, I oughta!.....
Reminds me of the time many years ago when I was oot and aboot up in Canada with some friends and went oot for breakfast. One of the guys asked if it was Canadian bacon that was served with the eggs. The waitress had kind of a puzzled look on her face and replied yes, it was Canadian bacon. Guess what he got, eh?
 
My dad, who was a butcher, swore by a mix of brisket and chuck. I definitely think chuck has to be at least part of the mix, but I'm not super fussy about what makes up the rest, other than I'm not a big fan of round. Round is pretty much flavorless, as far as I'm concerned.

Also, when I buy a whole rib eye or tenderloin at Costco, I take whatever scraps and trimmings are left and put them in a Ziploc to freeze. That goes into my burger (or meatloaf) blend, too.
I use round because of the price and the convenience during processing..no waste, silver skin or sinew to clog the plate. I think with the addition of rib eye and strip loin scrap/fat it makes up for the extra lean meat of the inside round..for home, I use blade, chuck and even brisket if I can get some cheap enough..
I'll snap a few shots if I can remember..I think I have to grind today at work..
 
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Reminds me of the time many years ago when I was oot and aboot up in Canada with some friends and went oot for breakfast. One of the guys asked if it was Canadian bacon that was served with the eggs. The waitress had kind of a puzzled look on her face and replied yes, it was Canadian bacon. Guess what he got, eh?
We call it back bacon and it is all but gone from stores. It is the back loin.. we also have pea meal bacon made from the back loin, which isn't prepared the same, but much more common..
 
We call it back bacon and it is all but gone from stores. It is the back loin.. we also have pea meal bacon made from the back loin, which isn't prepared the same, but much more common..

Ah, "on the Fourth day of Christmas, my true love gave to me
Four pounds of back-bacon..." -- Bob and Doug McKensie :LOL:

CD
 
Reminds me of the time many years ago when I was oot and aboot up in Canada with some friends and went oot for breakfast. One of the guys asked if it was Canadian bacon that was served with the eggs. The waitress had kind of a puzzled look on her face and replied yes, it was Canadian bacon. Guess what he got, eh?

I guess I live too far south from our northern neighbors. We have always called it ham slices.
 
I actually prefer a big, thin patty, like a smashburger, or my favorite fast-food burger, a Whataburger.

Do you have a preference? If so, what is it?


There are a lot of "I's" in my writing that follows, but the question is "my preference"...so...thanks for asking!



I started grinding my own meat some years ago. I prefer my burger cooked medium with some pink in the middle, but concerned about pre-ground meat safety for cooking this way. So, knowing a medium rare steak is perfectly fine to eat (even steak tartar) for those who do not have other health risks concerning their immune system, etc., it was clear to me the safest way to have a medium hamburger was to grind it myself from whole muscle.


I have long abandoned the grilled burger, like you CD I have watched a LOT of cooking shows and finally came to the conclusion that the flat iron griddle (or cast iron non-ridged pan) is the superior way (in my opinion, your mileage may vary) to cook a burger. This from watching the preferences and opinions of many chefs and my own personal experience and preference. Restaurants dont usually use cast iron, they use a pro-griddle which has a thick steel plate as its cooking surface, not something most home cooks have, so cast iron is the next best thing.



I grind my beef from chuck roast. I dont see a need for several meats, but I'm sure that is very good, I just keep that part of my burger life pretty simple. I use the 1/4" die on the grinder and I grind only once, never passing it through again and handle the ground meat very gently. I believe overworking ground beef is one of the main reasons for dense, dry burgers. I form my burgers to their shape only enough so they barely hold together for cooking (no worry about breaking up and falling through grill grates on a griddle pan).


When grinding the meat (I know many already know this but for any who dont) I always cut the beef roast up in to approx. 1" cubes and arrange on sheet pans and put in the freezer until just beginning to get firm on the outside of the pieces. I also chill my grinder parts in the freezer ahead of time. Heat develops in the grinding process and you dont want the fat to start to liquefy. When I feed the cubes in to the neck of the grinder chute, I take care to feed an even balance of lean and fatty pieces for best possible fat/balance/ratio in the ground product. I dont get too scientific about it, but my guess is I usually get 70-75/30-25% lean to fat ratio. I find the best ground beef for burgers when buying it is this ratio as well. Even 80-20 is too lean in my opinion.



Because of my Low Carb eating these days, my burger size has changed. I used to portion 6oz (I am a little obsessed with weighting foods and ingredients, I used to even weigh pasta for perfect portioning when I ate pasta) burgers and form them square to eat on ciabatta bread, but so far, since low carbing, my favorite "bun" for burgers now is this cheddar biscuit recipe . I make 6 "buns" from this recipe rather than the 10 specified for the portions in the recipe. And now I weigh out and shape 2oz portions for burgers slightly larger than a slider and smaller than the typical burger I used to make. 2 of these burgers makes a very satiating meal because the "buns" bring a solid protein load with them.


To cook smaller and flatter burgers to my liking, which again is medium/pink in the middle, or at least the instant the temp passes this phase is OK and still juicy, rather than intentionally cooking the meat to smithereens like some enjoy; I make sure my cast iron griddle is at least 450° (yes, I'm also temp obsessed and use a laser thermometer to know my pan temps) before putting the burgers on, and cook very fast at the high temp which sears the crust, yet gets the meat off the griddle before its overcooked. This requires a solid "mise en place" to have any toppings ready like cheese, so it can go on the instant the smaller flatter burger is flipped so I am not overcooking the burger waiting on the cheese to melt. Also, room temp cheese is a good idea.


I remove the burgers to a platter with a folded paper towel underneath to catch what are usually significant excess juices (after all, this whole writing is about how to get a properly cooked juicy burger, right?... so mine are ALWAYS juicy) so the burger doesn't carry too much moisture to the "bun".


I stopped making "meatloaf" burgers with a bunch of stuff in them a long time ago. I like to taste a pure burger. It is my opinion that there are no mix-ins needed for burgers, plus doing that just overworks the meat to get stuff evenly distributed. What is required, again, in my opinion, is a strong seasoning of salt and pepper on at least one side of the patty.


I pretty much have this burger thing "down" after about 30 years of previously thinking I knew what I was doing!:LOL:
 
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As far as flat top vs open flame grilling I don't have a preference. When cooking burgers indoors I mostly use a cast iron griddle but when cooking outdoors I always cook over charcoal.IMG_0212.jpg
 
Looks good roadfix! A lot of people swear by charcoal. It does add that "olde-tyme" barbecue flavor many of us grew up with.


I have a 6 burner LP fuel Viking cooktop out in my garage, along with deep fryers, etc.. I can also ventilate pretty well, so I keep most of that kind of cooking out there. So I'm kind of semi-outdoors. But for the african hot of the summer here in Virginia I do have a tiny gas grill that works pretty well and even a large countertop oven I use to do baking out on the back deck. That's because I AC my garage (keeps mildew down from the humidity here and gives me a comfortable place to work on stuff)...and mid-summer means when I ventilate, its draws that hot air in.



I haven't used charcoal in some time. I used to use it for my fireside setup at my bonfire location just because it made it easier than moving coals from the bonfire to underneath that grill setup. Haven't been doing as much "by the bonfire" cooking in recent years, need to get back to it.



One thing is for sure, there's noting wrong with a charcoal grilled burger at all. I just found my preference, and haven't grilled a burger in a few years now at least.
 
Oh, how I miss a real hardwood charcoal cooked burger.

I feel like a dog on a road trip, replete with head out the window, ears and tongue flapping in the wind as I drive by a park or backyard where someone is charcoal grilling burgers.
 
It IS a childhood memory trigger to so many of us, especially those over 40. Back in the days when our parents actually used those crusty grills at the parks and we even drank from the park open air water fountains!...nobody walked around nursing a bottle of water back then...and the burger grease would run down your arm as the ants were making their way up on to the picnic table...ah...the memories!..and the big swing-sets you could launch yourself 50' across the air off of, and the parents never blinked or worried about you...
 
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I like a nice fat juicy pattie. I don't grind my meat but after reading above, I now will give it a go. Thanks for the tips guys.

Russ
 
When I cook burgers indoors, I use a Cuisinart Griddler. It cooks the burgers very quickly with nice dark sear on the outside and medium on the inside. All in about 3.5-4.0 minutes.
 
Oh, how I miss a real hardwood charcoal cooked burger.

I feel like a dog on a road trip, replete with head out the window, ears and tongue flapping in the wind as I drive by a park or backyard where someone is charcoal grilling burgers.

Get a Weber Smokey Joe, like the one in the picture from Roadfix. They are cheap, and just right for grilling up a few burgers.

CD
 
After trying the reverse sear on rib-eye, I'm wondering how good a burger would be done on the Egg at 650F to 800F. Have to give it a try next time we have burgers. I might also try the plancha I bought for it. Best of both worlds.
 
I prefer thicker as well. In fact, I'll go a step further and make a Jucy Lucy, or "Daddy's Special" burger as my son used to call them when he was little.

One thin patty, a lump of Boursin cheese, then encase it with another thin to medium thick patty.
I'm not a great burger eater but you're tempting me. The other day I bought some very low fat "steak" mince (ground beef) and I've been thinking about burgers. I like the idea of your Boursin burger. I was thinking about Brie as I have some in the 'fridge but I have to go shopping today so I'll pick up some Boursin while I'm out - probably the herb-y one.
 
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