What's your favorite fowl?

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Chief Longwind Of The North

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I believe my favorite is corn fed goose, followed by Cornish game hens, ruffed grouse, capon, tame duck, free range chicken, (allowed to wander freely in protected pasture) Perfectly cooked smoked turkey. I like all birds bone in.

What are your favorites, and what parts?

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

larry_stewart

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Dominick.
The only chicken we ever named.
May her soul Rest In Peace.
 

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Marlingardener

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Favorite fowl? Chicken! I'm very fond of our small flock of egg layers (never to be eaten). And grocery store chicken is versatile. I get whole chickens and cut them up into two-person serving sizes, keep the wings, back, and bones for stock, and one 5 lb. hen gives us several meals.

In fact, we are having chicken piccata tonight!
 

Katie H

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Wow! So many to choose from. Chicken, of course, any part and any way it's prepared. Cornish game hens that I learned to love when my father introduced them to me at the Blue Room of the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans when I was about 13. That was 60 years ago. Tender, sweet little critters stuffed with wild rice and pecans. What's not to like? Introduced them to Glenn and he's now a fan. Lots of ways to prepare them.

Beyond that, there's duck, turkey and goose. Yummers for all!
 

dragnlaw

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miss them all

my all time favourite was George -

'Lonesome George' sitting with his pal Maya -

then he met Gracie - and his life changed

George and Gracie had adorable offspring
 

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CraigC

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my all time favourite was George -

'Lonesome George' sitting with his pal Maya -

then he met Gracie - and his life changed

George and Gracie had adorable offspring

George and Gracie were a pair of humpback whales... Never mind.:angel:
 

Aunt Bea

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I'll choose turkey!

It doesn't matter if it's the centerpiece of Thanksgiving dinner, a diner blue plate special with mashed potatoes and crater gravy, or a late-night sandwich with an ice-cold glass of milk. :yum:
 

dragnlaw

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Did they wind up in the pot ?

Nope, George is still around, Gracie died for reasons unknown (and you cannot put in the pot if cause is unknown). But their offspring are/were delicious.

I had incubated and hatched George, he was special. Had kept one of his sons, BillyBob. When Gracie passed got 2 more females, Thelma and Louise, for their partners. Everyone was happy. LOTS of eggs, to eat, to carve, to hatch.

My original pair Amelia and Erhardt, she died sitting on her nest and Erhardt got taken by a coyote a couple of years later. Had gotten another female for him, named her Abigail. Unfortunately the next spring discovered I had to rename her Albert.

miss them all...
 

Silversage

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As much as I love duck, I'd have to say my absolute favorite is a well roasted or rotisseried chicken. The salty, crispy skin and the sweet meat is pure comfort.
Roast chicken was one of the first things I learned to cook when I was about 10 or 11 years old. These days, I am more likely to put it on the rotisserie outdoors than to turn on the oven, but either way, it's delicious.
 

Roll_Bones

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1. Foie gras
2. Foie gras
3. Foie gras

I have never had this. But will the first time I see it on the menu. I wonder if I can make this at home? Of course I would need to find some goose liver?
It is goose liver right?
I like liver a lot.

I'll choose turkey!

It doesn't matter if it's the centerpiece of Thanksgiving dinner, a diner blue plate special with mashed potatoes and crater gravy, or a late-night sandwich with an ice-cold glass of milk. :yum:

I agree Bea. Roast turkey is the only thing I like about the holidays. Of course the sides are great too.
And the left overs are always enjoyed!

I really like quail. But they are bit hard to eat as they are so small. But they are great.
 

Aunt Bea

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I have never had this. But will the first time I see it on the menu. I wonder if I can make this at home? Of course I would need to find some goose liver?
It is goose liver right?
I like liver a lot.



I agree Bea. Roast turkey is the only thing I like about the holidays. Of course the sides are great too.
And the left overs are always enjoyed!

I really like quail. But they are bit hard to eat as they are so small. But they are great.

Next time you cook a turkey make a simple fois gras for the kitchen help.

This is a basic recipe but you will need to adapt the amounts to the size of the liver. I usually simmer the neck and giblets with celery, carrot, and onion, then remove the liver after the first few minutes. You can add a hard-boiled egg to the mixture to stretch it without impacting the flavor too much. A splash of cognac, sherry, or port won't hurt.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/284344/turkey-liver-pate-fois-gras/
 
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Chief Longwind Of The North

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Chief's Turkey/Chicken Liver Pate

1 tub chicken, turkey livers (1 lb.)
1 stick unsalted butter
1/4 tsp. rubbed sage
1/2 tsp. salt
3 tbs. minced onion
1 clove crushed garlic
1/4 tsp. ginger powder.

Saute onion, and garli, over medium-low heat until soft. Place tub ingredients into a sauce pan over medium heat, with a tbs. of butter. Stir until livers are cooked, but still pink inside. Pour pan contents into a blender, or food processor with remaining ingredients. Process until smooth. Place into suitable container. Place another tbs. Of melted butter on top to seal, and refrigerate. Serve at room temp.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

taxlady

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near Montreal, Quebec
I have never had this. But will the first time I see it on the menu. I wonder if I can make this at home? Of course I would need to find some goose liver?
It is goose liver right?
I like liver a lot.

<snip>

Pâté de foie gras can be made from goose or duck liver. But, it has to be a fat liver. Gras means fat. Foie gras means a fat liver. They force feed the birds to increase the size and fat content of their livers. It's controversial and considered animal cruelty. But, some chefs use ducks or geese that naturally fattened their livers before migration.

It is possible to make pâté de foie from other types of liver. Chief gave a recipe. I have made pâté from pork liver (a Danish recipe). It was very good. I have also made a very simple pâté from leftover, cooked chicken liver. All I did was fry some onions in lots of EVOO to the translucent, soft stage. Then I mixed it with the chicken liver, and put it through my meat grinder. I seasoned with salt and pepper to taste. A food processor would have worked. I don't remember why I chose the meat grinder.
 

Silversage

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I have never had this. But will the first time I see it on the menu. I wonder if I can make this at home? Of course I would need to find some goose liver?
It is goose liver right?

Fois Gras (not pate) can be either fattened duck or goose liver. Usually, if you can find it in a specialty shop, you need to buy the whole lobe. It has a very short shelf life in the fridge, so it's best if you are making it for a dinner party or other event that will use it all up. The only place I've found to buy slices is D'Artagnon. I have purchased 2-slice packages from them that are excellent.

When cooking it, you have to be careful not to cook it very long. A hot sear on each side will do it. It has a very high fat content, and as you cook it, the fat melts out. Too long, and you have nothing left but a puddle of grease in the skillet.

One of my favorite thing to do for Christmas dinner is a deconstructed beef wellington. Place the filet on the plate, top with a thin brush of dijon mustard, the brandied duxelles, the seared fois gras, red wine reduction demi glace, topped with a circle of puff pastry. The D'Artagnon slices are perfect one-to-one wiht the filets.
 

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