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Old 05-29-2006, 07:38 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txgrilled
Well I cook mine a lot different than most of you, I prefer new york strips over just about any other cut of meat.

2 strips of similar size in baking pan
Worshistar* sauce to coat just the bottom of baking pan
1 clove of garlic
Salt/Pepper/Cumin/Chipotle Chili Powder rubbed on steaks both sides
1 tsp of liquid spoke

I let sit for awhile in refrigerator,right before cooking lightly coat with olive oil

I cook most of my steaks medium rare and people tend to come over on the weekends to my house wanting steaks :)

You didn't say how you cook them.
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Old 06-18-2006, 11:39 PM   #22
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Speaking for the buttermilk, I have seen steak cooked plain with S&P but then cut into slices and soaked in a creamy white sauce, which worked quite well. It wasn't a rue though.

If I was to guess what was in the cream sauce, Cream, Milk (Possibly ButterMilk), S&P, Parsley, and possibly some bitter spice to remove some of the sweetness, like corriander...

DO NOT REDUCE THE CREAM...

It's actually quite a unique taste, and compliments the meat nicely. Which is very strange, as we all know dark for dark meats and light for light...
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Old 06-19-2006, 01:35 AM   #23
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That sounds about right... I remember eating it like that as a child. In our case the sauce came from the packet so I couldn't tell you what was in it precisely but it was pale and creamy and simply called pepper sauce. When we were out, my dad used to add a bit of milk to the cooking juices and stir it to make a sauce, then add fresh ground pepper. It didn't make as thick a sauce of course, but it might work with cream. Either way, it was very good. Thank god for that sauce too cause my parents always overcooked the meat to the point where it was unchewable
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Old 06-23-2006, 01:11 PM   #24
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I marinate my steaks in goyo and dales seasoning in the fridge for about 1 hour or so... I use my foreman grill or the broiler....
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Old 07-03-2006, 12:57 PM   #25
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I've found that the flavor of milk goes especially well with a good steak. The milk's natural sweetness counterballances the salt & iron meat flavor. A cream gavy, such as obtained by adding cream to deglase the pan that steak was cooked in, with coarse black pepper added would do the same thing.

The flavor of good beef doesn't require ballance as do many other foods. But the side do need to provide a counterpoint, to highlight the beef flavor. Black pepper works so well with beef because it has a slightly sweet flavor that ballances the salt.

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Old 07-03-2006, 04:29 PM   #26
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The perfect steak would be a nice piece of tenderloin (filet mignon) with my favorite seasoning, seared in olive oil then in the oven to finish cooking about medium well, topped with my homemade red wine sauce or chipotle bbq sauce.
  • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cups canned plum tomatoes and juices, puréed
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 Tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons honey
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 3 Tablespoons ancho chile powder
  • 2 chipotle chiles, canned
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
Heat the butter over medium heat in a heavy-bottomed medium sized saucepan. Add the onions and garlic and cook until translucent, 3-4 minutes. Add the tomatoes and water and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients and simmer for an additional 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Transfer the mixture to a food processor and purée until smooth, season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour into a bowl and allow to cool at room temperature. Will keep for 1 week in the refrigerator stored in a tightly sealed container.

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Old 07-11-2006, 02:03 PM   #27
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i use the KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) method for my steaks...

season with sea salt, a mixture of 70% black, 30% red pepper, and a pinch of garlic powder.

let stand for 2-3 hours to get all the way down to room temp.

in a black iron skillet, i use boyajian garlic infused olive oil and clarified butter (2 teaspoons) and sear on each side for about 3-4 min.

my problem is that when i flip-it, and the moisture from the top is immersed, it creates a smoke cloud that sets-off my alarm... but that might be a good thing.
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Old 07-11-2006, 05:14 PM   #28
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Actually, to my way of thinking, the perfect steak is that piece of beef that is cooked by yourself, or anyone else, just the way you like it.

I knew a lady who put baking soda on her steaks and pierced them with a fork before grilling on a hibachi. She used a lot of baking soda. I thought her steaks were horrendous. She thought they were divine. Her perfect steak was perfect for her. And when cooking her a piece of meat, if she were around, I would cook it the way she did. But my steak, well that's an entirely different topic.

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Old 07-11-2006, 06:24 PM   #29
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There's a small grocery store down the road in the next town that has very good, home butchered meat. DH buys the whole ribeye when they're on sale, then slices and trims them himself. This last one he bought is the best we've ever had...excellent marbling without the big chunks of fat in the center, and very tender.

He insists on cooking the steaks himself, and he is a purist. No marinades or fancy seasonings...he rubs the meat with EVOO, and sprinkles with salt, fresh ground pepper and granulated garlic. We like them best when cooked over charcoal, but we've had some good pan-seared ones, too. They always seem to get overcooked on the gas grill, but if you don't mind the mess in your oven, they can be darned good broiled.

Like Pete, I like mine almost burnt on the outside and rare on the inside. I call it "Philidelphia Style" instead of "Pittsburg Style", but we're in the same state.

One of my favorite steaks is a good aged sirloin. It's leaner, and has a wonderful flavor. But the top grade we get in nicer restaurants (prime?) is not readily available to the general public, at least not around here.

I guess I'll "make do" with the ribeyes. LOL!
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Old 07-12-2006, 07:16 AM   #30
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One of my favorite steaks is a good aged sirloin. It's leaner, and has a wonderful flavor. But the top grade we get in nicer restaurants (prime?) is not readily available to the general public, at least not around here.
You'd be exceedingly lucky to find prime grade sirloin, or any other meat for that matter unless you were in a fine dining restaurant. Some places use choice, but most use select grade.

Since sirloin isn't necessarily one of the most tender pieces of meat, many mechanical and nonmechanical methods of tenderization are used in restaurants for them including "steak punches" (a spring loaded mechanism with fork-like tines to punch holes into the steak thus breaking connectivity of the muscle) or "dips" with enzymes to help break down the muscle.

Ciao,
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