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Old 09-08-2014, 05:49 AM   #1
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Kennett Square PA Mushroom Festival

This past weekend, after 20 + years of wanting to attend, I finally got the chance to go to the Mushroom festival in the self proclaimed mushroom capital of the world.

Mushroom Farm Tour ( Maitaki, Shitaki, Oyster ( variety of colors)
Mushroom grow tent ( White mushrooms at various stages of growth)
Mushroom foods ( Mushroom Mac n Cheese, portobello fries, breaded shrooms..
Mushroom knick knacks
Mushroom apparel
Fresh shrooms for sale ( variety)
Typical food trucks and vendors ( stretched for about 1/2 mile of vendors

Had a great time, glad I finally got the chance to go

( Ill post pics a little later, gotta go to the market)

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Old 09-08-2014, 06:03 AM   #2
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Portobello Fries sound really interesting. Did they hand out recipe cards?
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Old 09-08-2014, 07:05 AM   #3
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Most were local restaurants dishing out their stuff, so no recipe cards. There were some vendors who were selling mushroom products that had recipe cards , but not for the portobello fries.
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Old 09-08-2014, 07:09 AM   #4
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here are some pics

Mushroom mac and cheese
yellow, pink and gray oysters
Shitaki
Maitaki
Growth tent
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Old 09-08-2014, 08:39 AM   #5
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There is sure to be a recipe somewhere on the internet. Will have to do a search.
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Old 09-08-2014, 08:46 AM   #6
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Basically deep fried breaded strips of Portobello mushrooms. The breading they used definitely had Thyme/ Sage ( probably other spices too, just hard to identify as they blended well together). There was a little bit of heat, but not too much. Also appeared to be Panko Bread Crumbs due to the look, texture and crunch factor. They served them with a side of a Mayo dipping sauce. Im not a mayo fan, so I just ate them plain. They were delightful
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Old 09-08-2014, 09:28 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
Basically deep fried breaded strips of Portobello mushrooms. The breading they used definitely had Thyme/ Sage ( probably other spices too, just hard to identify as they blended well together). There was a little bit of heat, but not too much. Also appeared to be Panko Bread Crumbs due to the look, texture and crunch factor. They served them with a side of a Mayo dipping sauce. Im not a mayo fan, so I just ate them plain. They were delightful
I did a search. Every recipe I looked at were just as you stated. So Portobello will go on my grocery list. I really should buy some Panko bread crumbs. I keep putting them on my list and never buy them. There was a restaurant in Tacoma that made stuffed mushrooms. I loved them. So I know I am going to have to try these.
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Old 09-08-2014, 09:51 AM   #8
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Good luck, If whatever recipe you use is a hit, send it this way I bought panko breadcrumbs awhile back, used them once and the results were great. But since I rarely use them, I always forget that I have them until its too late.
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Old 09-08-2014, 09:56 AM   #9
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Good luck, If whatever recipe you use is a hit, send it this way I bought panko breadcrumbs awhile back, used them once and the results were great. But since I rarely use them, I always forget that I have them until its too late.
Will do. And I will have to write it down as I am making them. This will not be a wing it recipe since it will be a first time making them.
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Old 09-08-2014, 09:58 AM   #10
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Looks like an interesting take, Larry.
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Old 09-08-2014, 10:21 AM   #11
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It was great. I always love doing farm, factory tours. I get a kick out of seeing how things are made, grown, assembled .... For years I've been wanting to tour a mushroom farm, just never got around to it. Im glad I finally did. I've grown mushrooms at home ( in those home mushroom log / box kits). Ive also made a mushroom log, after purchasing Spawn plugs and placing them in an oak log, which was relatively successful.
Seeing this first hand and being able to speak to the farmers and ask questions was a great experience.

I was hoping to go to the Hudson Valley Garlic Festival in a few weeks up in Saugerties NY, but looks like Ill be busy that weekend. Guess there is always next year.
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Old 09-08-2014, 10:28 AM   #12
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It was great. I always love doing farm, factory tours. I get a kick out of seeing how things are made, grown, assembled .... For years I've been wanting to tour a mushroom farm, just never got around to it. Im glad I finally did. I've grown mushrooms at home ( in those home mushroom log / box kits). Ive also made a mushroom log, after purchasing Spawn plugs and placing them in an oak log, which was relatively successful.
Seeing this first hand and being able to speak to the farmers and ask questions was a great experience.

I was hoping to go to the Hudson Valley Garlic Festival in a few weeks up in Saugerties NY, but looks like Ill be busy that weekend. Guess there is always next year.
I think every city kid need to visit a farm or two to learn where their food comes from. Fortunately, I think my generation learned early in life.
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Old 09-08-2014, 11:51 AM   #13
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I agree. When my kids were younger, we would take them to the local farm extension which had weekly farm activities for them. Anything from hands on milking a cow, to extracting honey from a hive and tractor rides through the farm. We also go to the local farms to pick fresh fruit , berries, pumpkins... right off the trees ( vines, bushes). And of course, we have our garden, so the kids not only know a wide variety of produce, but they also know where everything comes from and the hard work that goes with it. Just the other day, I was speaking with a coworker. He is in his 30's, a professional, and when I was telling him how I should have planted a second crop of peas instead of cucumbers in my garden, he looked at me with a blank face and said " what are peas? " I laughed , but then he told me he was serious, he wasn't sure what a pea was. My laugh turned to a look of concern and disbelief. I had to google peas and show the pics to him. When he saw it, he finally knew what I was talking about.
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Old 09-08-2014, 11:07 PM   #14
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It was great. I always love doing farm, factory tours. I get a kick out of seeing how things are made, grown, assembled ....
Not mushrooms Larry, but if you have never been to the Martin Guitar factory in Nazareth PA, GO! Very interesting. I was there over 40 years ago when a friend and I went camping on Cape Cod. He had two Martins that needed adjustments. When we dropped them off, we were taken on an informal tour. Zoom ahead decades later, and Himself and I toured their updated facility in 2012. In spite of a considerable amount of automation, much of one of their guitars is still hand-made. And still beautiful. The sample guitars you can try in their "studio" are fun if you play. That day I bought my only Martin guitar...it's a Christmas ornament for the tree!
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Old 09-09-2014, 02:04 AM   #15
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aww,, c'mon larry. a "professional" didn't know what peas were?

gimme one of them mushrooms.
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Old 09-09-2014, 05:42 AM   #16
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Not mushrooms Larry, but if you have never been to the Martin Guitar factory in Nazareth PA, GO! Very interesting. I was there over 40 years ago when a friend and I went camping on Cape Cod. He had two Martins that needed adjustments. When we dropped them off, we were taken on an informal tour. Zoom ahead decades later, and Himself and I toured their updated facility in 2012. In spite of a considerable amount of automation, much of one of their guitars is still hand-made. And still beautiful. The sample guitars you can try in their "studio" are fun if you play. That day I bought my only Martin guitar...it's a Christmas ornament for the tree!
Touring a guitar factory is right up my alley. I've been embarrassing myself on guitar for years. Thanks for the tip. If I would have known this last week, could have added it to my road trip

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aww,, c'mon larry. a "professional" didn't know what peas were?

gimme one of them mushrooms.
Sadly yes. I was thinking maybe he had a few ' mushrooms' not to know what a pea was. or possibly that I had eaten a few and was hallucinating the whole conversation. Then again, this is coming from a guy who thought the USA had 52 states ( 50 + Hawaii and Alaska). Took my then 10 year old daughter to convince him he was wrong.
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Old 09-09-2014, 06:58 AM   #17
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aww,, c'mon larry. a "professional" didn't know what peas were?

gimme one of them mushrooms.
bt, I know a lot of folks who fail to understand whey folks have gardens. After all that is why they have supermarkets. And some of them think it is a waste of good time. The time you spend in your garden, could be better spent in a barroom. These are folks I don't socialize with very often.
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