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Old 05-21-2020, 11:15 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Heat pan well. Add butter or oil or both. Drop eggs and cook until they can be flipped.
Once flipped over remove the pan from the stove an d cover with something.
The eggs will continue to cook, but much slower.
A smaller pan is also a good idea. And why 4 eggs at once? Cook one at a time and keep them warm until you learn how to cook eggs.

Also since you like your eggs cooked well you are gutting pretty much what you asked for. Well done eggs.
I also think practice and experience is required when cooking anything. You seem to be lacking in experience.
I can make over easy eggs in a stainless steel pan. My wife cannot. She must have a non-stick and even then its iffy.......
4 eggs at once due to that being the only pan I have - the other one is crap as you can see. Other pans in the house are cheap garbage covered in carbonised oil.

Due to my pan size cooking one egg at a time would damage the pan in the areas that have no food on them. Those areas would overheat.

Tell me you're joking. No fried eggs, no mater if they are well done or not should have this plasticy unchewable skin.
I regularly eat out. Nowhere have I come across eggs as they cook when I cook them.
I never eat runny yolks. I always asked for them well done.
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Old 05-21-2020, 01:41 PM   #22
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Purchase for yourself an egg poaching pan. You will never get a crispy, chewy skin. And you just cook the egg until the yolk is solid. The only way to mess it up is to boil all of the water from the pan.

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Old 05-21-2020, 02:09 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newbiecool View Post
- That is a video of McDonalds cooking ONLY eggs.
JUMP TO 0:19 and watch from there - They have some special cover with a hole in which they pour water. WTF?!

BUT you can see before they do that, they are already cooking the eggs o that surface. And obviously it's not sticking nor is it getting crispy. HOW?!

Later you will see them all use the egg making device on that special metal surface. It's not even a pan.

How is there no fat used to cook them?

1:45 is an overhead shot seconds before someone cracks eggs into the rings. There is no fat in them.

That surface cannot be non stick.
Anyone know what that surface/device is called?

I saw that same surface in a NAVY food video:
JUMP TO 1:37 into that video.

Notice he uses METAL utensils to cook with and what appears to be NO FAT. And his scrambled eggs are incredibly perfect. No browning, no crispy crap, just amazing golden scrambled eggs.
You may not see any fat, but I'm sure there is fat on those cooking surfaces.

The funny looking lid is so the eggs will cook from the top too. The water is to create the steam that cooks the tops of the eggs.
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Old 05-21-2020, 03:09 PM   #24
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Purchase and use this pan - https://www.amazon.com/Modern-Innova.../dp/B0741WD5Q6 You will get perfect eggs every time. You can also use the cooked eggs to make deviled eggs, and the egg cups to make egg bites. You can make custards and cooked puddings in them as well. Once you use this pan, you will be spoiled.

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Old 05-21-2020, 03:23 PM   #25
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Purchase and use this pan - https://www.amazon.com/Modern-Innova.../dp/B0741WD5Q6 You will get perfect eggs every time. You can also use the cooked eggs to make deviled eggs, and the egg cups to make egg bites. You can make custards and cooked puddings in them as well. Once you use this pan, you will be spoiled.

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Thanks, but I want to learn how to cook them myself so that no matter where I am I can cook them.

That looks like it would make life easier and likely would be healthy and fast vs fried eggs. I might but that, BUT I still want to learn how to cook.

Thanks
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Old 05-21-2020, 04:41 PM   #26
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after reading the warning to read things closely, I decided to stay out of this one.
but there are a couple things missed or only slightly alluded to which are important.

the first is: why are the egg whites spreading out so thin?
three things come to mind

#1 the pan is not properly preheated. egg whites, like all proteins, tend to 'shrivel up' when exposed to heat - fish curls, chicken balls up, beef shrinks....
plop a batch of eggs in a cool pan and they'll have time to spread out before they set.
#1a those videos? McD is using custom designed thermostatically controlled flattop griddles to cook the eggs. they have spend kabillions getting the design right.
#1b those videos? the water? they are steaming the top of the eggs to cook 'from the top' simultaneously.
a lid has been suggested here - but on careful reading, apparently that is outside the realm of possible.

#2 the pan is simply too big.

#3 you're in UK. are these Lion Seal eggs? if so, there's a date on the carton - which is 28 days from when the chicken laid the egg. as eggs ages, the white gets thinner/less cohesive. if you're close/at/past the 28 day mark (on careful reading I see: "I eat out mostly...") that could explain the extra thin running whites making the rubber binky chew.

if you want to try poached eggs - do you have a small bowl? crack the egg(s) into the bowl, set the bowl in simmering water, start counting. use a lid, if that is within the realm of possible. eventually you may want want to wipe the inside of the bowl with a fat - the white will "stick" to a squeaky clean bowl.

it's not difficult to fry an egg as you like them. however when every suggestion is not possible, you will have difficulty achieving your goal.
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Old 05-21-2020, 05:37 PM   #27
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Also consider eggs cook better from room temperature. When I worked at McD closing shift put out eggs for the morning shift.

Take your eggs out and let them warm up some while you get other things ready.
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Old 05-21-2020, 07:19 PM   #28
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America's Test Kitchen just uploaded this video about cooking eggs.

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Old 05-21-2020, 10:35 PM   #29
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I "heard" or read somewhere that older eggs whites are thinner and spread out more while frying.
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Old 05-22-2020, 05:43 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
after reading the warning to read things closely, I decided to stay out of this one.
but there are a couple things missed or only slightly alluded to which are important.

the first is: why are the egg whites spreading out so thin?
three things come to mind

#1 the pan is not properly preheated. egg whites, like all proteins, tend to 'shrivel up' when exposed to heat - fish curls, chicken balls up, beef shrinks....
plop a batch of eggs in a cool pan and they'll have time to spread out before they set.
#1a those videos? McD is using custom designed thermostatically controlled flattop griddles to cook the eggs. they have spend kabillions getting the design right.
#1b those videos? the water? they are steaming the top of the eggs to cook 'from the top' simultaneously.
a lid has been suggested here - but on careful reading, apparently that is outside the realm of possible.

#2 the pan is simply too big.

#3 you're in UK. are these Lion Seal eggs? if so, there's a date on the carton - which is 28 days from when the chicken laid the egg. as eggs ages, the white gets thinner/less cohesive. if you're close/at/past the 28 day mark (on careful reading I see: "I eat out mostly...") that could explain the extra thin running whites making the rubber binky chew.

if you want to try poached eggs - do you have a small bowl? crack the egg(s) into the bowl, set the bowl in simmering water, start counting. use a lid, if that is within the realm of possible. eventually you may want want to wipe the inside of the bowl with a fat - the white will "stick" to a squeaky clean bowl.

it's not difficult to fry an egg as you like them. however when every suggestion is not possible, you will have difficulty achieving your goal.
Non stick pans should not be preheated. Clearly states so in the instructions of the manual for the pan. You CAN kind of 'preheat' by adding oil. Which is what I do. There is no way to know the temperature of the oil nor do I know the ideal temperature required for the eggs for the second they hit the pan.
Get the oil to hot and when you put the eggs in the bottom will crisp and become hard plastic. Rest of the egg won't have cooked. Too cool is better but not ideal.

McDonald's do it, the navy do it, plenty of people make fried eggs at home. It's not working for me and we have to look at the many variables as to why it's not.
Variables include but I many have missed some:

- Pan
Different pans have different heating efficiency. Mine is very efficient. Heats up like a mother trucker with little heat.
Different pans have different surfaces.
How much nonstick property remains.

- Heat level

- Temperate of the pan just a second before the eggs hit the pan and during. The pan gets hotter and hotter I noticed even on the lowest heat setting. Again. I remind you. I use the large hob.

- Gas hob size

- Fat
I use Oil. Actually I got it wrong. I'm using Filippo Berio Classico olive oil that's IN date. Not Napalonia or whatever it's called.

- Duration per side of egg

- What exact eggs being used and their age

Never said a lid isn't possible. I don't have one for my pan nor is there one in either of the houses we have.
Greenpan, as far as I'm aware, don't sell the lid separately. I think one doesn't exist for this pan.
Prior to buying a lid, we must determine the cause of the issue. Or causes. No point throwing money at it hoping that'll fix it.

As stated in my previous reply, the size of the pan shouldn't matter. Navy, McDonald's use griddles with vast amounts of flat space. Yes I see McDonald's up the rings.
I've also watched many YouTube videos of people cooking fried eggs and they cook them in large pans without issue.

The eggs are locally produced by a farm. The guy who distributes them says they are better than supermarket eggs (then again he would. It's in his interest to). He sells to many local business's. Who then sell to customers. We have a shop so he supplies us with eggs.
They are labelled free range. Class A. Large.
They have a best before date. I'll include a photo on the carton, box whatever it's called.

That's true. The older the egg, the runnier it is. But I've no way of telling I think, how old the eggs are.

Didn't say I want poached. But learning a variety of techniques and therefore cooking methods is important. So I'm happy to learn.

I made them again today.
Same method.
Large hob. Lowest heat.
Olive oil.
4 eggs.
But this time I used a TON of oil. Yet where the oil didn't spread, the eggs still stuck and crisped.
Due to the non stick coating and size on pan, the oil cannot spread evenly everywhere. Instead there are little pools of oil. Some bigger than others. Most of it pools to the edges, so my eggs mostly miss the oil underneath as it doesn't exist, as it's mostly around the sides.

Still I got some crisping.

I tried flipping much earlier today too.

Also it sticks like crazy to my non stick flipper thing. It always has. So I've had to rub it hard when washing it with the green scourer which has scratched off its non stick coating.

I freaking hate cooking eggs. Just trying cook with mostly whites is just as much a nightmare. Mostly whites omelette. Try it.

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Old 05-22-2020, 07:18 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newbiecool View Post
Non stick pans should not be preheated.
That's crazy. 90% of the time any pan should be preheated.

Quote:
Clearly states so in the instructions of the manual for the pan.
Then you need a different pan.

Quote:
There is no way to know the temperature of the oil
Put empty pan on medium low heat. After a minute or so, dip a couple fingers in some water and shake them over the pan to deposit one or two small drops water into the pan. If it simply evaporates, it is not hot enough. The pan will be hot enough when the water maintains the shape of balls and dance around the pan.

At that point wipe out the water and add the oil, heat until it gets a shimmery look. Then it is time to add your eggs.
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:16 AM   #32
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How to Use and Care for Nonstick Cookware

Using your nonstick cookware in the manner that the manufacturer intended will help keep your cookware in the best condition:
  • Some manufacturers recommend rubbing a thin coating of vegetable oil over the cooking surface before using your nonstick cookware for the first time, which will condition and protect the cooking surface.
  • Do not preheat an empty pan. Nonstick cookware is usually made of aluminum, which heats faster than heavier, denser stainless steel. Add a little bit of oil to the pan first (enough to lightly coat the surface), and preheat it for a few seconds before adding the food.
  • Use oil, such as vegetable oil or grapeseed oil, rather than nonstick cooking spray. Nonstick spray contains lecithin, which will eventually make your nonstick surface gummy.
  • Use only low or medium heat on nonstick cookware. Higher heat can degrade the cooking surface and, depending on the type of nonstick coating, has the potential to release toxic vapors into the air.
  • Avoid using metal utensils on a nonstick cooking surface. Instead, use wooden spoons, nylon, plastic or silicone-coated utensils. This will prevent the surface from getting scratched or nicked.
  • Check with the manufacturer before using your cookware in the oven and observe the recommended maximum temperature. Some nonstick cookware is oven-safe, but many brands are not.
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:26 AM   #33
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Non-stick pans made with Teflon can't be heated to high temperatures. Browning meat in a Teflon pan is not a good idea. In addition, the entire cooking surface of the pan should be covered as any uncovered portions can quickly overheat and begin to give off toxic fumes. Teflon is great, and safe for cooking eggs, braising, poaching, and cooking things that contain water, such as sauces, gravies, stews, etc.

you are correct in not preheating Teflon coated pans as they can quickly rise above safe cooking temps. If you need to preheat a pan to sear something, or quickly cook, as in stir-frying, stainless steel, high carbon steel, and cast iron are the types of cookware to use.

As your eggs are getting crispy edges, you are using too high a cooking temperature. Use no higher than medium heat. Add butter before turning on the heat. When it begins to bubble, add the eggs. Cover the pan with any kind of lid that will keep in the steam. Both eggs, and butter contain water. This will turn to steam and cook the eggs from the top, as the heat from the pan will cook the eggs from the bottom. You will eliminate the crispy edges, and cook within the safe zone for Teflon coated pans.

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Old 05-22-2020, 09:35 AM   #34
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This is from an article in Good Housekeeping from November 2007:

When nonstick surfaces reach a temperature exceeding 500 F., the nonstick surface begins to break down and starts releasing chemical compounds. When the surface temperature reaches 660 F., gases are released which can cause flu like symptoms in humans. These gases can be fatal to small birds. At 680 F., toxic gases are released. . .

Look at the temperatures mentioned. Normal preheating would NEVER get your pan this hot. Any oil in the pan would start smoking and set off your smoke detectors before the pan ever got to 500ºF, let alone the high 600 degree temps needed to cause a heath issue.

Let's not overreact.
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Old 05-22-2020, 10:06 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by newbiecool View Post

McDonald's do it, the navy do it, plenty of people make fried eggs at home. It's not working for me and we have to look at the many variables as to why it's not.
Variables include but I many have missed some:
I cooked a few eggs in the Navy.

The flat top (griddle) was preheated. Different sections were heated to different temps so that we could cook different things.

Oil was always added to the flat top then moved around with the spatula. This left a thin film of oil on the entire cooking surface. But the eggs were not cooked in a pool of oil.

You should try this.

Crack your eggs into a bowl so that they are ready and inspected for bits of egg shells.

Take your pan put it on a smaller hob put it on low. Add a little oil to you pan. Use a paper towel and ensure all of your pan has a thin film of oil including the sides.

Turn the heat up just a little and tilt the pan slightly to one side.

On the low side add the eggs. This will keep them from spreading out to much. When they start to firm up you can slowly lower the pan back until its flat on the hob.

Use your spatula to make sure the eggs are not stuck to the side of the pan.

When your ready to flip gently get the spatula under the egg and flip.
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Old 05-22-2020, 01:10 PM   #36
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How to Use and Care for Nonstick Cookware

Using your nonstick cookware in the manner that the manufacturer intended will help keep your cookware in the best condition:
SNIP[/LIST]
I already know this unless you wrote this for the other person that told me I need to get a new pan. Looks like there are even less knowledgeable people on here then myself 'giving advice'.

I have done a lot of research into cookware recently. From what I read, some people are choosing not to use any non stick due to the chemicals it contains; no matter that in 2013 PFOA was banned. Apparently companies are using other chemicals that are just as toxic.
These people are saying to buy only stainless steel and learn how to use these pans correctly.
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Old 05-22-2020, 01:14 PM   #37
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That's crazy. 90% of the time any pan should be preheated.
No. Only if it's NOT non stick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottinPollock View Post
Then you need a different pan.
Again. No. I don't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottinPollock View Post
Put empty pan on medium low heat. After a minute or so, dip a couple fingers in some water and shake them over the pan to deposit one or two small drops water into the pan. If it simply evaporates, it is not hot enough. The pan will be hot enough when the water maintains the shape of balls and dance around the pan.

At that point wipe out the water and add the oil, heat until it gets a shimmery look. Then it is time to add your eggs.
This only applies to STAINLESS STEEL PANS.
I know of this method used to tell when a pan is the right temp.
HOWEVER once again, there is no way to regulate the temp of the pan DURING cooking. NO ONE has ANY idea as to the temp of the pan while cooking.

Please read what I wrote. In my case my pan gets hotter and hotter despite being on the lowest heat setting.
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Old 05-22-2020, 01:18 PM   #38
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Non-stick pans made with Teflon can't be heated to high temperatures. Browning meat in a Teflon pan is not a good idea. In addition, the entire cooking surface of the pan should be covered as any uncovered portions can quickly overheat and begin to give off toxic fumes. Teflon is great, and safe for cooking eggs, braising, poaching, and cooking things that contain water, such as sauces, gravies, stews, etc.

you are correct in not preheating Teflon coated pans as they can quickly rise above safe cooking temps. If you need to preheat a pan to sear something, or quickly cook, as in stir-frying, stainless steel, high carbon steel, and cast iron are the types of cookware to use.

As your eggs are getting crispy edges, you are using too high a cooking temperature. Use no higher than medium heat. Add butter before turning on the heat. When it begins to bubble, add the eggs. Cover the pan with any kind of lid that will keep in the steam. Both eggs, and butter contain water. This will turn to steam and cook the eggs from the top, as the heat from the pan will cook the eggs from the bottom. You will eliminate the crispy edges, and cook within the safe zone for Teflon coated pans.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North.
You clearly didn't read my post. I stated many times in a few of my posts that I am using THE LOWEST POSSIBLE HEAT SETTING albeit with the largest burner as that is the burner that matches my pan size.

Why are you talking about Teflon coatings? I use a GREENPAN. Look that manufacturer up and go to their site. They do NOT use teflon.

As for the steaming method..... that would result in steamed eggs. Which might be ok. I am want to learn as many methods as possible to cook eggs. I am starting with frying.
Whether the eggs steam or not depends on whether you fully cover the pan or not. Partially covered won't fully steam cook them but may still generate enough steam to cook the tops.

I wrote about why I don't want to use butter. BUT I will use butter tomorrow to see if that makes any difference. Cooking method will remain the same.

Appreciate all constructive replies.

Thanks
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Old 05-22-2020, 02:07 PM   #39
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Some non-stick pans can be heated empty. This is from the use and care instructions for my Scanpan non-stick frying pan. I have highlighted a couple of points in blue.

Quote:
Never use aerosol sprays or cooking sprays:

The propellants in these type of nonstick products can impair the nonstick properties of our pans if not properly cleaned after every use – we recommend using your favorite oil, butter or fat for taste as you don't need to use any anything in our nonstick pans if you don't want to.

For best cooking results:

We recommend heating your pan for 60-90 seconds on medium heat to get the perfect cooking temperature (you'll save energy, too!) at which time your pan will be ready to sear, brown and deglaze!
If you use our pans on a higher heat, we recommend using a high-heat flash point oil such as grape seed, avocado, rice or vegetable oils for optimum cooking performance.
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Old 05-22-2020, 02:13 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by newbiecool View Post
the other person that told me I need to get a new pan. Looks like there are even less knowledgeable people on here then myself 'giving advice'.
Wow! this from someone who seemingly can't fry a few eggs. I have numerous non-stick pans I use for eggs and omelettes, and not one of them has care and use instructions that say I can't preheat the pan (they only mention low to medium heat, keeping things to under 350°F, and plastic or wood utensils).

Quote:
This only applies to STAINLESS STEEL PANS.
I know of this method used to tell when a pan is the right temp.
HOWEVER once again, there is no way to regulate the temp of the pan DURING cooking. NO ONE has ANY idea as to the temp of the pan while cooking.
Nonsense. I use an IR thermometer to bring the pan to about 300°F. Since I am assuming you have no such device, I provided the water test, which is the same in any pan (not just stainless steel).

Once you add butter (my preferred with eggs) or oil, the pan temperature will come down, and come down again when you add the eggs. If you don't have a pan that can be heated to 300°F, you don't have a pan worthy of cooking in... PERIOD!

Don't bother replying to this for my benefit, because I will not see it as you are now on my ignore list.
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