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Old 05-31-2017, 08:05 PM   #1
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How long or how to cook dry black beans?

I am trying to determine how to cook dry black beans. Every time that I try the end up still crunchy and inedible. I do not want to presoak them. I just want to put them on the stove and cook them for however long it takes to make them good.
If I put them in a pot on the stove how long and at what temp would I cook a cup or two them at?

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Old 05-31-2017, 08:14 PM   #2
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The answer is, they cook faster if you presoak them, drain the water, and cook them the next day. How long will it take? It always depends on how they were dried, and how long they were kept dry. You could get a precise amount of time, if you knew how they were dried and how long they were kept dry. After soaking overnight mine take 2 hours, then the shells split and the inside is soft, or it may take 4 hours, or it may take sometime inbetween. There won't be a recipe with an answer for you.

It would be common for me to boil/simmer them for 2 hours, taste them, chew them, decide to cook them longer, cook longer, taste them, chew them, cook longer. Once they are mostly soft, I will drain and cool them, then use them in my recipe.
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Old 05-31-2017, 09:23 PM   #3
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I usually do the quick soak method. I put the beans in a pot with water, bring to a boil, turn the heat off and let them soak, covered, for a few hours. Drain, rinse, add more water or broth, and slow simmer them for several hours until they're tender. I add veggies close to when the beans are getting tender, so the veggies don't turn to mush. Keep a close eye on them and add more liquid as needed, or take the lid off to evaporate some of the liquid.

When I know I'm going to cook dried beans, I start the process in the morning. Otherwise, I'll use rinsed and drained canned.
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Old 05-31-2017, 10:57 PM   #4
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If you don't want to pre soak them, use a pressure cooker. Or cook them in the oven in a covered Dutch oven.
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Old 06-01-2017, 07:43 AM   #5
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Insanity: doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.

There are tried and true reasons for presoaking, even a quick-method presoaking, that's why people have been doing it for so long. Yes, you can cook them from dry using plenty of water and lots and lots and lots of time until they soften, assuming they aren't really old, in which case they probably never will. You can also cook them in the pressure cooker from dry, but you'll have lots of blown out mushy beans more than likely
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Old 06-01-2017, 10:08 AM   #6
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I used to make a pot of black beans about once a week to take for lunches. I would soak them overnight in salted water, then drain, rinse, and refill with fresh water in the morning. I don't recall them ever taking longer than about an hour and a half to cook.

One tip. Don't cook beans in anything acidic like tomato sauces, or liquid that contains vinegar or citrus juice. They will never soften. If you're making something like chili, cook the beans first before adding any acidic ingredients.
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Old 06-01-2017, 10:21 AM   #7
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You don't have to soak them.

So You Like Flavor? Don't Soak Your Black Beans! | Serious Eats

Just cook them until they are tender. If they don't soften up, the beans are probably old and they will never cook right. Or you have really hard water.

Also, as Steve points out, don't cook them with anything acidic.

Salt is fine, though.
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Old 06-01-2017, 02:03 PM   #8
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I use the quick soak method and I put salt in that water to soften the skins. Bring to a boil and then let them soak for an hour. Then drain and rinse, cover with cold water again and into the pressure cooker for exactly 5 minutes at 15 psi. Quick cool down method (I run cold water over the top of the pressure cooker). Rinse the beans in a colander with cold running water. Perfect, every time.
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Old 06-01-2017, 02:23 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
You don't have to soak them.

So You Like Flavor? Don't Soak Your Black Beans! | Serious Eats

Just cook them until they are tender. If they don't soften up, the beans are probably old and they will never cook right. Or you have really hard water.

Also, as Steve points out, don't cook them with anything acidic.

Salt is fine, though.
I LOVE KENJI!!
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Old 06-01-2017, 03:32 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I LOVE KENJI!!

Kenji is a culinary rock star. I love him.

He has never steered me wrong. I don't soak my black beans anymore and they come out better.
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Old 06-01-2017, 05:20 PM   #11
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I have always soaked black beans, cannelli / White beans and pinto or rose colored beans and chick peas overnight in salted wáter ..

As many, same time to simmer the next day, approx. 2 hours (+ a few minutes).

Interesting to see some soak and some do not ..

Goodnight.
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Old 06-01-2017, 05:35 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Sagittarius View Post
I have always soaked black beans, cannelli / White beans and pinto or rose colored beans and chick peas overnight in salted wáter ..

As many, same time to simmer the next day, approx. 2 hours (+ a few minutes).

Interesting to see some soak and some do not ..

Goodnight.
The subject in this thread is soaking black beans. The thicker skinned beans benefit from soaking, but not thin skinned black beans. If you read the posted link you'll be convinced.
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Old 06-01-2017, 07:05 PM   #13
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I'll definitely try Kenji's method next time I cook up some black beans.
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Old 06-01-2017, 07:09 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
The subject in this thread is soaking black beans. The thicker skinned beans benefit from soaking, but not thin skinned black beans. If you read the posted link you'll be convinced.
Thanks for mentioning that part of the article. I read it but somehow missed that the first time. I do love serious eats and I don't find them overly informative, I see them like the baby bears porridge, it is 'just right' for me.
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