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Old 09-01-2006, 02:05 PM   #1
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Sushi Roll Maker?

Has anyone ever used a sushi roll maker? i want to make very basic rolls only...with sushi rice, king crab meat, yellowtail, spicy tuna, cream cheese, jalapeno
(not all in the same roll of course
do i need a good rice maker to make awesome japanese sticky rice? is that the rice they use in rolls?




I know i can use google but i want opinions from my mates on here.



Pics and detailed critiques and comments would be awesome!

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Old 09-01-2006, 02:38 PM   #2
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You need a saucepan to make the rice. Then you add vinegar and sugar to it.

You need a bamboo mat to make the rolls.

Total equipment investment, less than $20.

Fresh sushi, priceless.
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Old 09-01-2006, 02:41 PM   #3
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Mylegsbig, you can just use plain old rice, add some vinegar and sugar to it and you will have acceptable sushi rice.

Bamboo mats are called sudare if I am not mistaken and are cheap and are very very helpful. Trying to roll that danged nori without one is virtually impossible.

And I want to ask...why not all in the same roll? Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.
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Old 09-01-2006, 05:16 PM   #4
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short grain rice right? i take it you all will give me step by step instructions when i get it? where can i get the best nori?
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Old 09-01-2006, 06:08 PM   #5
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Yep short grain rice. I find nori at my local upscale supermarket, but if you have access to an Asian market then that would be your best bet.
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Old 09-01-2006, 09:27 PM   #6
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I've heard the blacker the nori, the better.

Also, when you make sushi rice, mix the sugar and vinegar with some salt. Makes all the difference.

MLB, after you place the nori on the rolling mat, place your row of rice 1/4 inch away from the nori edge. Add your ingredients while respecting this 1/4 inch clearance. This way, when you roll on the first turn, the clearance will help seal the fillings while you tighten that first turn on itself.

In some restaurants, I see their rolling mats are lined with cling wrap. I think this is a great idea to prevent rice sticking to the mat.
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Old 09-02-2006, 07:21 AM   #7
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I always use japanese rice, it usually says 'sushi' rice right on the bag. You do not need a rice maker. When you take the rice out of the pot, put it into a bowl and start paddling rice vinegar into it until it's cool enough to handle.

All you need (and some don't even really need it, depends on dexterity and experience) is a bamboo mat, made specifically for sushi rolling. Place the nori on the mat (I also put a piece of plastic wrap down), the the rice, which you press on, filling in all the gaps, then your fillings, about an inch from the edge closest to you. Then, begin rolling, tightly. Use the plastic wrap to secure it and chill for a while. Chilling makes it just a bit easire to slice.

I was at a food show recently. One of the vendors had nori in a rainbow of colours and flavours. You really couldn't even call it nori because it wasn't seaweed...but made of rice, actually. Paper thin sheets of flavoured rice. The presentation possible is amazing.
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Old 09-02-2006, 08:45 AM   #8
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just a quick question if nobody minds, this nori I have the sheets are quite thick like multi-layers of thin, and it`s also Very dry.
do you need to soak this before using it?
at the moment all I do with mine is cut it up into thin strips with scisors and add it to the appropriate soups.
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Old 09-02-2006, 10:43 AM   #9
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No you don't need to soak it. Yes it should be very dry. It will roll well if you use the sudare mat and it will absorb just enough moisture from the rice to become pliable. Also as Vera has mentioned you should chill a bit to make slicing easier.
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Old 09-03-2006, 07:34 AM   #10
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I use Cal-Rose rice. It is what just about everyone ate in Hawaii when I lived there. My nori came out a little tough, so I went to the only local sushi bar and watched, and they toast it for a little bit in a little toaster oven. We did it with neighbors, and each of us had our bamboo mats and plastic wrap, and as they day wore on, we got better at getting the rolls tight enough. Hint: If you don't live where you can get really good fresh fish, and your friends are likely to say, "RAW FISH, GROSS", sushi doesn't mean raw fish. Make a lot of california rolls, cucumber rolls, shrimp rolls, etc. Get people used to the idea. The sushi party was a huge success. Maybe it was all the saki and plum wine ...
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Old 09-03-2006, 10:57 AM   #11
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true, IIRC, the Raw fish dish is called Sashimi.
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Old 09-03-2006, 06:41 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YT2095
true, IIRC, the Raw fish dish is called Sashimi.
Whilst I don't prepare Sushi, my buddy does - he always soaks the nori a little while before using it.
You should use Sushi rice - no other, or you won't get the stickiness you need.
Sushi making is an art. If you watch a REAL Sushi chef doing his stuff, instead of a Franchise Kiddy, you'll see the difference. It's awesome. It's art. It's a whole culture you're putting in your mouth!

As for the raw fish (sashimi) - I eat very, very little fish. Almost none. But Sashimi Tuna I love - it is simply Ambrosia; food for the gods. They only use the very essence of the heart of the tuna loin, for example - simply melt-in-the-mouth stuff.
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Old 09-03-2006, 08:50 PM   #13
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I've never soaked the nori and never seen a recipe that called for it. You do have to roast the nori. It changes color to almost black when roasted. However, you can easily find pre-roasted nori.
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Old 09-04-2006, 12:18 AM   #14
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I LOVE sashimi, and when living in Hawaii (off & on for ten years) ate more raw seafood than you can imagine. I grew up eating raw beef on a regular basis, so when I was introduced to ahi sashimi, I was enthralled. It was a very short trip to other kinds of raw seafood. But I now live in the Midwest, and feel that I need to be more careful. So when I make sushi here, it is mostly cooked, and I rarely eat sashimi. I miss it!
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Old 09-04-2006, 01:09 AM   #15
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raw fish?

seaweed?

savages...

j/k

i've seen some sushi chefs quickly soak nori, but maybe because it was extremely dry, or old (eek!).


one trick to learn is one hand wet, one hand dry.
the wet hand forms the rice (wet so it doesn't stick to your fingers), the dry hand handles the fish and wasabi.
when making rolls, use the dry hand to hold the nori on the edge, the wet hand to press down the rice.

also, wet your knife before slicing so the nori doesn't tear and the rice won't stick to the blade and fall out.

almost all sushi places i've been to use the plastic wrap on the mat, as chopstix had mentioned.
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Old 09-04-2006, 07:16 AM   #16
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Good on you for making your own Sushi..its easy and cheap not to mention rewarding.!

Please make sure you use proper Sushi seasoning/vinegar not just any old vinegar about the house..
If I am making Sushi to be served at a party, I always include the pink ginger in the rolls, not left for the clients to pick up and add. Also, I mix wasabi with soy so that no one has to worry about spreading wasabi then dipping in soy. A real hassle if you have a drink in the other hand!!
Keep a little sticky rice back to anchor your little soy sauce bowls too. No one notices but it sure saves a soy sauce mess on carpet if platters tillt.

As you are rolling sushi, stop 1/2 way and really SQUEEZE the roll along its width thru' the bamboo mat to compress the filling. You will see Japanese Sushi Masters bang the ends of the rolls very firmly before taking out of mat. I would too if I could find a mat EXACTLY the same size as the nori sheet!!!
I live in hope.
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Old 09-04-2006, 08:47 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynan
If I am making Sushi to be served at a party, I always include the pink ginger in the rolls, not left for the clients to pick up and add.
For your next party you might want to leave some ginger out. The ginger traditionally is not meant to be eaten with the sushi. It is meant as a palate cleanser between different types of sushi. I was once told by a sushi chef that he knew who the Americans were without looking at their faces by who put ginger on their sushi. He also said something similar about wasabi in soy, but I won't go there. The bottom line though is that (as far as I am concerned) there is no right or wrong way. Whatever works for you is the correct way to do it.
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Old 09-04-2006, 09:11 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
For your next party you might want to leave some ginger out. The ginger traditionally is not meant to be eaten with the sushi. It is meant as a palate cleanser between different types of sushi. I was once told by a sushi chef that he knew who the Americans were without looking at their faces by who put ginger on their sushi. He also said something similar about wasabi in soy, but I won't go there. The bottom line though is that (as far as I am concerned) there is no right or wrong way. Whatever works for you is the correct way to do it.
I am such an american
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Old 09-04-2006, 09:12 AM   #19
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And there is nothing wrong with that (although others can argue that point lol)
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Old 09-04-2006, 12:36 PM   #20
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We love sushi and sashimi - we got so into it that we've been buying molds and stuff for some of the fancier shapes. I've got enough mats and dishes (half of which are now in storage) for 12 people to have a wonderful sushi party.

The last one we had beef sashimi - absolutely fantastic. I think next week we're going to go get the goodies for sushi - we'll take the ferry over to SF and get the tuna and goodies. We're also getting a jar each of wasabi and ginger caviar for garnish. Our local Safeway now has a fresh sushi bar!!! We grabbed some Saturday - it was darn good. Of course Japanese mayo and lots of wasabi were pretty good too. I think I could eat myself sillywith Sushi.
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