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Old 03-21-2014, 12:24 PM   #1
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Concierge (or boutique) medical practice

Does anyone go to one of these? And, if so, do you like it (or dislike it)?

They're becoming more available but still not replacing the Primary Care physician.

Concierge medicine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-21-2014, 12:40 PM   #2
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I think this should be in Off Topic discussions. It's not General Cooking Information > Health, Nutrition and Special Diets.
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Old 03-21-2014, 01:37 PM   #3
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I think this should be in Off Topic discussions. It's not General Cooking Information > Health, Nutrition and Special Diets.
O.K. I don't care either way. If you report it to the moderators perhaps they can move it.
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Old 03-21-2014, 04:31 PM   #4
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When I lived in Denmark, the government run health care had two tiers, similar to the hybrid "concierge medicine". My mum paid a premium. She had the same doctor as me. If I wanted to go to his walk in clinic, it was a few hours in the morning and usually a long wait. She could call for an appointment in the afternoon. She also got a semi-private room at the hospital. Both tiers had the same doctors and services. One was just a bit nicer.
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Old 04-03-2014, 09:22 AM   #5
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Evidently there a small upward surge in 'blue collar concierge' medical practices.

Physicians Abandon Insurance for 'Blue Collar' Concierge Model - US News
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Old 04-03-2014, 12:39 PM   #6
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Evidently there a small upward surge in 'blue collar concierge' medical practices.

Physicians Abandon Insurance for 'Blue Collar' Concierge Model - US News
Interesting article. Now we just need the insurance companies to come up with a plan that allows you to be reimbursed for the monthly fees of being signed up with a concierge medical practice. And, instead of paying the doctors, reimburse the patient who sends in a receipt.
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Old 04-03-2014, 12:49 PM   #7
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Interesting article. Now we just need the insurance companies to come up with a plan that allows you to be reimbursed for the monthly fees of being signed up with a concierge medical practice. And, instead of paying the doctors, reimburse the patient who sends in a receipt.
Yeah, right.
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Old 04-03-2014, 01:49 PM   #8
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Yeah, right.
Okay, I live in Canada and I'm covered by Quebec health insurance (RAMQ). But, I have medical insurance through Stirling's job. When Stirling needed a CTscan or MRI (I don't remember which) our doctor said she would give him a referral and he could make an appointment with a clinic that would charge RAMQ and probably have to wait six months to get the appointment or he could go to a private clinic near us and get an appointment right away and pay for the scan. Our insurance reimbursed the whole amount at the private clinic. But, the clinic didn't have to do any insurance paper work. I just sent a scan of the receipt to the insurance company.
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Old 04-03-2014, 02:54 PM   #9
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I don't know what we are talking about here, but US medical care/insurance needs a complete overhaul. Which we were promised, but got worse than what we used to have. I try not to go to doctor now. Because I have 2500 deductible now and that is a lot of money.
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Old 04-03-2014, 03:14 PM   #10
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I don't know what we are talking about here, but US medical care/insurance needs a complete overhaul. Which we were promised, but got worse than what we used to have. I try not to go to doctor now. Because I have 2500 deductible now and that is a lot of money.
I don't know what we are talking about here,

I'm not really sure either but I'll assume that TL is right.

Insurances are so different (talking about the U.S.). Using Blue Cross as an example two people who have BC may have completely different plans which changes how much co-pay they are liable for.

I have Blue Cross but because of the plan I have NO co-pay.

My meds (and some that I had to use were maybe $1000 for 30 days) I only pay one dollar for them. A four day stay in the ICU cost me zip! (There are no typo in this paragraph) But I happen to have a really great ins. plan (for retirees) and that's not the norm.

The next person may have a humungus co-pay for services and meds.

As long as there are lobbyists for insurance companies I fear that the US system is going to keep it's status quo for quite a while. But when I read of what people who have NHS (not just here ) report I'm not sure which is better. There are pros and cons enough for both sides.

I think your idea, CharlieD, about trying not to go to a doctor is a great idea. Let's hope you can fulfill that for the rest of your life.
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Old 04-03-2014, 08:11 PM   #11
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I don't think not going to doctor is a good idea. But I simply cannot afford it. I too have no copay with BC, but I only have 70% of visits covered. Same with hospitals etc. And that is after I spent $2500.

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Old 04-10-2014, 05:28 AM   #12
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. Both tiers had the same doctors and services. One was just a bit nicer.
I hope I've misunderstood this. Do you mean that the same doctors and nurses treated people on the higher tier more courteously/gave better medical care because the patient paid more?
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Old 04-10-2014, 05:50 AM   #13
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I don't think not going to doctor is a good idea. But I simply cannot afford it. I too have no copay with BC, but I only have 70% of visits covered. Same with hospitals etc. And that is after I spent $2500.

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Our National Health Service may not be perfect but at least we don't die in childbirth or of cancer solely because we couldn't afford medical care.

We pay National Insurance contributions through payroll and this covers medical treatment, Job Seekers Allowance (an unemployment benefit), sickness benefit and state pension contributions and child allowance.


You pay National Insurance if you’re:
  • 16 or over
  • an employee earning above £153 a week
  • self employed and making a profit over £5,885 a year (unless you get an exception)
The exact amount you pay depends on:
  • how much you earn
  • whether you’re employed or self-employed
If you are on unemployment benefit, unable to work through long term illness or disablement, at home raising children, retired or a full-time student you get credits so you don't miss out

Most people apart from children under 16 or retired people pay for prescriptions but not the full price of the medicine - IIRC it's about £7 per item whether it's a 100 x aspirin tablets or the most expensive prescription-only drug on the list.
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Old 04-10-2014, 06:01 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Our National Health Service may not be perfect but at least we don't die in childbirth or of cancer because we couldn't afford medical care.

We pay National Insurance contributions through payroll and this covers medical treatment, Job Seekers Allowance (an unemployment benefit), sickness benefit and state pension contributions and child allowance.


You pay National Insurance if youíre:
  • 16 or over
  • an employee earning above £153 a week
  • self employed and making a profit over £5,885 a year (unless you get an exception)
The exact amount you pay depends on:
  • how much you earn
  • whether youíre employed or self-employed
If you are on unemployment benefit, unable to work through long term illness or disablement, at home raising children, retired or a full-time student you get credits so you don't miss out

Most people apart from children under 16 or retired people pay for prescriptions but not the full price of the medicine - IIRC it's about £7 per item whether it's a 100 x aspirin tablets or the most expensive prescription-only drug on the list.
You can if you wish and can afford it, "go private" in which case you pick up the bill yourself. There are health insurance companies which make lots of money out of this but apart from getting a nicer room or to jump the queue in a non-life threatening issue there isn't much point although when I started with a hearing problem my employers paid for some diagnostic work because there was a lengthy NHS waiting time and the hearing problem was interfering with my work.
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Old 04-10-2014, 11:11 PM   #15
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I hope I've misunderstood this. Do you mean that the same doctors and nurses treated people on the higher tier more courteously/gave better medical care because the patient paid more?
No, that's not what I meant. I mean that they get a better hospital room. If you are on the lower tier and need to see the doctor immediately, they have a few hours at some point during the day. You just show up and wait your turn. It can be a long wait. If you are on the higher tier, you call and make an appointment, often for the same day.
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