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Old 03-15-2008, 04:10 PM   #1
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Question ISO Prime Rib/Standing Rib Roast ideas

OK, so I'm feeling ambitious this Easter. I need to cook for only 10 adults and about 5ish kids. This is for Wifey's side of the family. Traditionally my side would roast or grill a leg of lamb but her side isn't really into lamb. We ALWAYS have ham at nearly every family get together. Personally, I've cooked my last ham for a very long time I love ham but I'm just tired of cooking it all the bloody time!

Anyway, even though the meal will be at mt BIL's house I'm still charged with cooking the main dish. I'll also be holding a small and very informal cooking class for the ladies in the family that aren't as ambitious as I am in the kitchen. I haven't cooked very many Prime Rib roasts. Maybe 2 or 3. It's just too expensive to cook for more than 4 but impossible to get a perfect medium rare with a roast small enough for 2. Now I have 10 people and I'm gonna splurge!

So there are many different ways to cook a rib roast. I've always wanted to try a salt dome but I don't know if you can obtain a good crust / sear with a salt dome. I thought about a rotisserie buy BIL doesn't have one. BIL said to pre-cut and grill & serve Cowboy steaks but I'm not liking that idea. The flavor just isn't the same as an in-tact rib roast.

So... For all who'se reading... Give me your best ideas... Please!!! I know I'm gonna have to take out a second mortgage to pay for choice roasts. My primary objectives are taste (of course) and presentation. I kinda thought about plating two ginormous piles of salt and offering a mallet to a few diners. Tell them to crack the salt open and see what's inside. Too messy??? Too ambitious??? Not smart at all??? Mallets + beer & wine = a trip to the hospital for stitches and a concussion??? Let me have it. The good; the bad; and the fantastic!!!!

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Old 03-15-2008, 04:38 PM   #2
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having cooked a couple .. personally for the money i will
take a beef tenderloin over prime rib ..
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Old 03-15-2008, 04:56 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by love2"Q" View Post
having cooked a couple .. personally for the money i will
take a beef tenderloin over prime rib ..
Truthfully, for my own taste, I have never had a tenderloin taste as good as a bone-in prime rib. That's not to say it can't be done. I just haven't ever had one.
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Old 03-15-2008, 05:42 PM   #4
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We love prime rib..we do it very simply,rub with evoo, then salt and pepper..roast to desired doneness..There is nothing so good as a prime rib you don't need a lot of fussing with it..If you wish it to be fancy, add some nice sauteed mushrooms and a good horseradish sauce and au jus..the meat should stand on it's own..

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Old 03-15-2008, 06:56 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kadesma View Post
We love prime rib..we do it very simply,rub with evoo, then salt and pepper..roast to desired doneness..There is nothing so good as a prime rib you don't need a lot of fussing with it..If you wish it to be fancy, add some nice sauteed mushrooms and a good horseradish sauce and au jus..the meat should stand on it's own..

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Exactly....Buy the best piece of meat you can....And don't mess it up!!!
A 325*F oven seems to work best for me.....
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Old 03-15-2008, 07:11 PM   #6
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Yea, time & temp are always a struggle for me the first few attempts. Also, since I'll be using my BIL's oven the temp will be different I'm sure. Plus, he's using propane from a tank outside and I'm on CNG from the city.

I've had some people tell me to put a good salt rub on the roast the day before to draw out some water then pat it dry with paper towel & re-season to recipe. Any thoughts on that??
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Old 03-15-2008, 07:12 PM   #7
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Also, bone-in or bone out?? I think I'd prefer bone-in and present it at the table whole then cut out individual rib prime.
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Old 03-15-2008, 07:21 PM   #8
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Home Chef, you can read here as to what I do for standing rib roast.

This is really a very simple recipe. You can skip the dry aging and it will still produce a wonderful rib roast.
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Old 03-15-2008, 08:38 PM   #9
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Foolproof Roast Every Time

Standing Rib Roast

1 Ea Standing Rib Roast
TT Salt and Black Pepper
1/4 C Flour


Preheat the oven to 500º F.

Just before putting the roast into the oven, rub it with salt, pepper, and flour.

The timing of the cooking is based upon the number of ribs and the degree of doneness you want. Multiply the number of ribs by 12 minutes for rare, 13 minutes for medium rare, and 14 for medium. For example, if you have a 4 rib roast and want it to be medium rare, you would calculate 4x13=52 minutes.

Place the roast into the 500º F oven and cook it for the prescribed time.


DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR ONCE YOU PUT IN THE ROAST.

After the calculated cooking time, shut off the oven and don't open the OVEN door.

Leave the roast in the oven for at least and hour and a half (and up to three hours. There will be no change in the degree of doneness).
Do not open the oven door during this time.

After the 90-180 minutes, remove the roast and cover it with foil and let it rest for 30 minutes before carving.
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Old 03-15-2008, 08:42 PM   #10
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I don't think you need to season a good rib roast with anything but S&P. Don't mess with it too much. 1/2 hour per pound at 325 or 350 will get you a perfect medium rare. On a very large roast you also have the advantage of pleasing everyone because it will be done well or medium well on the outside and fairly rare on the inside. Get bone in. Theres a carnivore in every crowd that likes to gnaw on the bones.
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Old 03-15-2008, 10:12 PM   #11
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Get your roast with the bone, have your butcher cut around it and tie it, that way all you do is cut the string when your meat is done...No muss no fuss and those who enjoy a good bone have it.

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Old 03-15-2008, 10:26 PM   #12
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I have cooked thousands of prime ribs and I all ways just salt and pepper, 350*F oven
and check with a instant read thermometer after about 3 hours it should be at 130*F which is medium rare let rest for 30 minutes before you cut. , A full seven bone roast should give you approx 12-14 large cuts of prime beef. If?? you are skilled carver keep it on the bone and give some of your guests a bone to knaw on. Horse radish sauce
equal portions of mayo sour cream and a touch of salt and fresh horse radish to taste

good luck
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Old 03-15-2008, 11:44 PM   #13
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I agree with using the meat thermometer idea. Guestimate on the low side at 12 minutes per pound, bone in. Roast at 450 to 500' F. Or better yet, use an electronic thermometer that activates an alarm when the desired temp is reached. Shoot for 130' internal temp. Turn off the oven and remove the roast. Let sit for 15 mintues before carving.

Seasonings should be nothing more than salt & optionally, pepper. Always cook rare. If the guests want thier meat a little more done, keep a pan of au-jus simmering in a chafing dish and dip the meat into it. This will cook it a bit more for those that want it that way, right at the table. Then, everyone gets what they want.

Serve with crusty bread and butter. Whole wheat has enough flavor to stand up to the fib, and is great for dipping in the juice. Sauces should include plain horseradish, horseradish mixed with mayo, A1, and Worcestershire. Great sides are simple and flavorful as well, a juicy cole slaw, some corn pudding, or rice pilaf with mushrooms, or baked potatoes with side fixin's. I personally prefer sweet potatoes to regular spuds, but that's just me. If you're going to have a salad, make it a simple salad made of green leaf, or red leaf lettuce, and a good oil & vinager, or raspberry vinagerette.

Beverage, your choice. For me, make it milk, ice cold and whole. The flavor of milk compliments good beef perfectly. The two bring out each other's flavors.

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Old 03-27-2008, 04:30 PM   #14
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OK, so I ordered the rib roast (20lbs @ $9.95/lb) I really can't afford to screw this cut of meat up. I think I have my technique down. I'm going to rotisserie it whole and season it with plenty of salt & pepper. I thought about slitting it in several spots to insert whole cloves of garlic but I'm still not sure about that. I'll let the roast come to room temp before placing it on the grill. I'll grill it to 130 - 135 then tent & rest for 20 - 30 minutes before carving.

1. Do you think I shoul dwrap the roast with bacon to help keep the fat in?

2. What do I do about Au-jus? I planned on installing a drip tray under the roast to catch all the juice & drippings. Is Au-jus really just a thickened / reduced beef juice or is there an actual recipe for it?

Here's what the menu will look like. The *'s are the dishes I will be cooking...

Prime Rib*
Rustic mashed potatoes*
Gravy or Au-jus*
Fresh baked white bread*
Green Bean Casserole a'la Home Chef*
Broccoli / Cauliflower Casserole
Corn
Probably one more veggie. Not sure what it is yet.

Dessert
Home made Key Lime Pie a'la Home Chef*
French Silk Pie from Baker's Square (Flame suit on)
Home Chef's HomeStyle Mocha's cookies*


How does it sound so far?

I also thought about making some Tres Leche cake. Too much??
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Old 03-27-2008, 04:57 PM   #15
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Au Jus is simply the meat drippings with a little salt and pepper thrown in for flavor. It has a wonderfully meaty flavor and is usually used at the table to further cook individual slices, or to dip crusty bread in, or to spoon over a French-Dip sandwich.

There is no need to use either lardoons, or wrap the meat in bacon. Standing rib has a natural fat cap that keeps things moist and flavorfull. Just don't overcook your meat, or over-season it. Let the natural beef flavor be the star of the show. That's what standing rib is all about.

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Old 03-27-2008, 05:08 PM   #16
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Thanks again G-Dub I didn't think I would need to wrap in bacon but I figured I'd ask first. My family REALLY likes garlic. After more reading on different sites I think I've decided to do a rub of salt, pepper, olive oil, and smashed garlic. Turn that all into a paste & rub generously but not overwhelmingly. I totally agree that the meat should actually taste like meat.

Someone on another forum sufggested to use the fat drippings of Yorkshire Pudding but I don't think I will have enough time for that as well. I have enough to cook as it is LOL.
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Old 03-27-2008, 07:26 PM   #17
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Yep agree, I would leave off the bardon bacon.

Just an idea, cut the taters into 3/4 inch chunks or so, and roast them about the meat - will save a step and they always taste great.

As an alternative to the bread you could do Yorkshire pudding, a lovely, and traditional accompaniment to standing rib roasts.

It is incredibly simple, you only need oven time and that can become a problem.

Personally would lose one of the casseroles (am not a fan of cauliflower so guess which one I would chose).

As the idea you take the roast out of the oven, put in the Yorkshire pudding (if you have never had it is is great).

One casserole you can nuke. And all the rest can be done on the stovetop.

The desserts are yours.

Sure it is going to be a great feast.
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Old 03-28-2008, 05:45 PM   #18
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Pics of the roast!!!

OK, here's the pics of the butchered rib roast. It's 17 pounds of glorious tasty beef! The butcher removed the chine bone and tied it up for me. All I have to do is skewer it, massage it with seasoning, and cook it.

On edit... I can't figure out how to post pics yet. Hopefully I will figure it out quick!
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Old 03-28-2008, 06:51 PM   #19
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I think I've figured out how to post the pics. Here's a few samples.

Click image for larger version

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Click image for larger version

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I have it wrapped in a towel right now to draw out a little moisture. Unless someone tells me otherwise I'll change the towel tomorrow and again on Sunday morning.
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Old 03-31-2008, 08:50 AM   #20
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I did a roast that size for Christmas. I believe it was a 8 rib roast.

I let the meat sit out on the counter for about an hour before roasting it. I made a mixture of olive oil, fresh rosemary, fresh thyme, salt, pepper and garlic. Mix well to make a paste and rub well over the meat. You really want to overseason the meat because the seasoning will only be on the edges and not the flat surface so more is better.

Place on a rack ove rough chopped carrot, celery red onion, whole smashed garlic, beef stock and red wine.

Baste every 20-30 minutes. 10 minutes before it's done, remove the foil cover. Let stand for 15-20 minutes, then carve. I was able to get 14-15 steaks from mine alternating w/bone and without. Strain the liquid in the roasting pan for your jus.
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