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Bitser 11-01-2021 06:01 PM

A friend invited me to his home pueblo (Jemez) for the harvest fiesta. For a few days prior to the event, we were kept busy breaking up wood (juniper, mostly) for the clay ovens (estufas) which is done not with an ax but with a sledge. Ka-Boom!

We also helped butcher young goats, the meat of choice for the incendiary red chile served to visitors. No tomatoes. The red is all chile.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-CkVhO5b-p...00/imgres.jpeg

Chief Longwind Of The North 11-01-2021 07:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bitser (Post 1666219)
A friend invited me to his home pueblo (Jemez) for the harvest fiesta. For a few days prior to the event, we were kept busy breaking up wood (juniper, mostly) for the clay ovens (estufas) which is done not with an ax but with a sledge. Ka-Boom!

We also helped butcher young goats, the meat of choice for the incendiary red chile served to visitors. No tomatoes. The red is all chile.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-CkVhO5b-p...00/imgres.jpeg

Yeh, I'm very familiar with incendiary chili. I've had many the brave/foolhardy say that I can't make chili too hot for them. All but one person has been wrong:lol:. the thing is, it's wicked hot, but still has great flavor depth. It's the balance of flavors, meats, veggies, peppers, and a secret ingredient or two. It's way too hot for anyone in my household but me. If you like a scorching hot bowl of reed, I know how to make it. It's where dragons come to get their fire.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North.

GinnyPNW 11-01-2021 08:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North (Post 1666229)
Yeh, I'm very familiar with incendiary chili. I've had many the brave/foolhardy say that I can't make chili too hot for them. All but one person has been wrong:lol:. the thing is, it's wicked hot, but still has great flavor depth. It's the balance of flavors, meats, veggies, peppers, and a secret ingredient or two. It's way too hot for anyone in my household but me. If you like a scorching hot bowl of reed, I know how to make it. It's where dragons come to get their fire.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North.

Whenever we have friends with children to a meal, at home or at a campout, I like to offer the kids a teeny, tiny taste of items at the "buffet." A chance for them to see if they might like that on their plate, rather than have them shy away from something unfamiliar for fear they will be "required" to clean their plate with items they would rather not eat.

Chief, I think I would need that teeny, tiny taste at your house! Pretty, please? :wink:

karadekoolaid 11-01-2021 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bitser (Post 1666219)
A friend invited me to his home pueblo (Jemez) for the harvest fiesta. For a few days prior to the event, we were kept busy breaking up wood (juniper, mostly) for the clay ovens (estufas) which is done not with an ax but with a sledge. Ka-Boom!
We also helped butcher young goats, the meat of choice for the incendiary red chile served to visitors. No tomatoes. The red is all chile.

Bring it on. I bet those dishes of chile were spectacular.

Chief Longwind Of The North 11-01-2021 08:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GinnyPNW (Post 1666233)
Whenever we have friends with children to a meal, at home or at a campout, I like to offer the kids a teeny, tiny taste of items at the "buffet." A chance for them to see if they might like that on their plate, rather than have them shy away from something unfamiliar for fear they will be "required" to clean their plate with items they would rather not eat.

Chief, I think I would need that teeny, tiny taste at your house! Pretty, please? :wink:

You want the recipe? If it's too hot. make a big batch of mild chili, and mix the two. Portion out and freeze. This was always the spiciest chili in the hot category in any chili cookoff I participated in.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

GinnyPNW 11-01-2021 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North (Post 1666238)
You want the recipe? If it's too hot. make a big batch of mild chili, and mix the two. Portion out and freeze. This was always the spiciest chili in the hot category in any chili cookoff I participated in.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

I'm afraid I'm past the super hot...I just want the teeny, tiny taste, please!

Bitser 11-02-2021 12:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by karadekoolaid (Post 1666237)
Bring it on. I bet those dishes of chile were spectacular.

They were really good: chile, oven bread, sliced cheese, and home-canned peaches. But I wasn't accustomed to the heat, and kept hiking to the local store for cartons of milk and Rolaids.

It took a while to adjust, but now I can enjoy really hot dishes. My wife doesn't share that taste (alas!) She likes Texas-style chili, with BEANS!

Chief Longwind Of The North 11-02-2021 08:30 PM

Super hot chili (Raging Bull) toned down (Frisky Calf):

Frisky Calf Hot Chili

This chili is toned down for regular mortals, who love a bit of heat, but not too much. It has a deep, rich chili flavor, with lots of meat, beans, and just the right amount of veggies to make a rich, thick, stick to your ribs chili.

• 19 oz ca n diced tomatoes
• 15 oz. dark red Kidney Beans
• 15 oz. Pinto, red, or black Beans
• 2 stalks Celery, sliced
• 1.5 lb. Coarse ground beef (ask butcher for coarse grind 80/20 ground sirloin, or round)
• 1 ea. dried Tabasco Peppers, Jalapeno Peppers
• 1/4 tsp. Cayenne Pepper
• 3 Ancho peppers, minced (hint: place Masa Harina, cumin, coriander, and ancho into your food processor, or blender to make you own chili powder to add wonderful depth of flavor)
• 1 red sweet pepper, seeded and chopped
• 1 large onion, roughly chopped
• 1/2 tsp. ground Coriander
• 1 tbs. ground Cumin
• 2 tbs. chili Powder
• 2 tbs. freshly-chopped Cilantro
• 1 dash Ghost Pepper powder
• 1 squares unsweetened Baker's Chocolate
• 2 tbs. Masa Harina
• 2 tbs. cooling oil

Mesquite flavor Liquid Smoke to taste, or better yet, grill the ground beef over smoky hardwood, with the lid down, before breaking up for the chili.

Brown The ground beef and set aside. In a large Dutch oven, add cooking oi;. Heat over medium-high until it begins to shimmer. Add the onion, peppers, and herbs, and spices. Stir for thee minutes. Add the ground beef. Continue cooking until the beef is browned. Keep the fat in the pan as many of the flavors are fat soluble. Add the remaining ingredients and stir to mix evenly. Reduce heat to medium, and cover. Simmer for 30 minutes. Remove lid, stir, and reduce to desired thickness. If possible, make this the day before, as it’s even better after refrigerating overnight.

My mother’s chili was almost a soup. We crumbled saltine crackers into our bowls sometimes, depending on the mood of the person.
I loved it that way, and still do. However, I also love the thick, hearty version. This chili will work for both.


Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

Bitser 11-02-2021 09:50 PM

Beans in chile?

Madrecita de Dios!

Are you from Texas?

Chief Longwind Of The North 11-02-2021 11:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bitser (Post 1666326)
Beans in chile?

Madrecita de Dios!

Are you from Texas?

Though I enjoy Texas Red, I'm a Yooper, and in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, no chili is made without beans, and thick chunks of ground beef, lots of broken up (quartered) tomato, and rough chopped onion.. We also don't care for Cincinnati sweet chili. Beans add flavor, and a richness to our chili. up in the U.P., those beans help provide the energy boost to warm you to you toes after a day playing, or working in the average teen to zero temps. Let me tell you, after shoveling the driveway by hand for an hour and a half, walking into the house with ice frozen to your beard and moustache, that chili saves your life:ohmy:. If you haven't tried chili with beans, make some, just to know what it's like.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

dragnlaw 11-03-2021 06:20 AM

When I first saw a recipe of chili 'without' beans I wondered why they called it chili? Where I grew up (Ontario & Minnesota) Chili was mainly with Red Kidney Beans, ground beef, onion, celery, sweet green peppers and tomatoes.
I sometimes now add White Beans for colour variation.

Still make it like that.
IMHO chunks of meat and no beans makes it a stew! :rolleyes:

Just Cooking 11-03-2021 06:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dragnlaw (Post 1666340)
When I first saw a recipe of chili 'without' beans I wondered why they called it chili? Where I grew up (Ontario & Minnesota) Chili was mainly with Red Kidney Beans, ground beef, onion, celery, sweet green peppers and tomatoes.
I sometimes now add White Beans for colour variation.

Still make it like that.
IMHO chunks of meat and no beans makes it a stew! :rolleyes:

Love it!!! :lol:

Ross

karadekoolaid 11-03-2021 07:37 AM

Im on the Beans team here. No chile con carne is complete without it:lol::lol:

Andy M. 11-03-2021 09:46 AM

I find it hard to believe that frugal southwestern folk didn't try to stretch chili with the addition of beans.

msmofet 11-03-2021 10:42 AM

Chili with beans here.

Lamb chili?

GinnyPNW 11-03-2021 10:50 AM

I'm more of the chili WITH beans...unless we're talking Chili Colorado. That said, 9 times out of 10, when I'm making beef burritos, I start with a layer of "refried" beans, then the chili, then the shredded cheddar....it is soooooooo good! Okay, now I need to go to the butcher shop today.

bethzaring 11-03-2021 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 1666362)
I find it hard to believe that frugal southwestern folk didn't try to stretch chili with the addition of beans.

I'm married to a native New Mexican Hispanic and beans are always served as a side dish, never mixed in with red. Red is only red chile and ground meat.

Andy M. 11-03-2021 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bethzaring (Post 1666368)
I'm married to a native New Mexican Hispanic and beans are always served as a side dish, never mixed in with red. Red is only red chile and ground meat.

I understand, but can you see how that might have evolved from beans on the side to beans mixed in?

I'm not claiming mixed in beans are authentic, just that it's not the crime of the century.

karadekoolaid 11-03-2021 12:51 PM

In my opinion, Chile con carne is one of those dishes that just happened. There was no original recipe, nothing written down; it was a dish that was prepared with what was available.
Id imagine the beef was definitely there at the start, and since chiles and beans are indigenous to Mexico and the SW, they were there too.
Did they use lamb? Probably not, even though the Spanish brought pork , beef and lamb. Northern Mexican cuisine uses lots of beef - barbacoa and birria, for example.
When it comes to the crunch, you make your Chile con Carne however you want! As for Cinci Chile - I tried it last time I was there. It will be the last time.:rofl::rofl:

GinnyPNW 11-03-2021 01:06 PM

I'm with you Karadekoolaid: When it comes to the crunch, you make your Chile con Carne however you want!

The best part of DIY is doing it the way that suits you!


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