After you have applied a dry rub to your meat and before you cook it

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Sorry, I should have clarified. The meat has had the dry rub on it for a few hours so now it has soaked up all the flavor.

I kind of think if I cook the whole thing with the rub on, it might get burned but not sure.
 
Sorry, I should have clarified. The meat has had the dry rub on it for a few hours so now it has soaked up all the flavor.

I kind of think if I cook the whole thing with the rub on, it might get burned but not sure.

Still no! A rub will put a "bark" on barbecued meat. That is not burning. That is the Maillard reaction at work.

How are you planing to cook the meat? If you are going to cook it low and slow, you need that rub to creat a nice crust on the meat. If you are going to cook it over high heat, you shouldn't have used a rub -- just a light seasoning.

As I type this post, I have the beef plate rib shown below cooking on my smoker. It has a simple Texas rub of coarse ground salt and black pepper, applied generously. It has been cooking for six hours at 250F. I took this picture a couple of minutes ago. It still has about an hour to go.

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CD
 
Hi CD:

I am just gonna cook it on stove-top, in a skillet. I also don't want to cook it for hours. Just long enough so that it's cooked and ready to be eaten.
 
Hi CD:

I am just gonna cook it on stove-top, in a skillet. I also don't want to cook it for hours. Just long enough so that it's cooked and ready to be eaten.

How much "rub" did you use? If it is heavily coated, just brush the excess off. Don't wash it. In the future, if you are going to pan fry meats, just do a light seasoning of the meat. What is generally considered a "rub" is a pretty heavy layer of seasoning.

If you take your hands, or a few paper towels, and brush off most to the rub, you will be fine. If you wash it off, your meat will get wet, and won't brown in a skillet. You need to always make sure your meat is dry before you put it in the skillet, or the water will prevent the meat from browning.

CD
 
How much "rub" did you use? If it is heavily coated, just brush the excess off. Don't wash it. In the future, if you are going to pan fry meats, just do a light seasoning of the meat. What is generally considered a "rub" is a pretty heavy layer of seasoning.

If you take your hands, or a few paper towels, and brush off most to the rub, you will be fine. If you wash it off, your meat will get wet, and won't brown in a skillet. You need to always make sure your meat is dry before you put it in the skillet, or the water will prevent the meat from browning.

CD
But, the water won't prevent the meat from greying.
 
If you are cooking the meat in an open pan - of course the water will eventually evaporate and the meat will eventually brown. But in the meantime the meat will, in all likelihood, be way overcooked!
 
Wan, I also did not know that a "dry rub" usually meant a heavy crust of seasonings left on for a long cooking method.
Although I did know that the above is done - it did not prevent me from also thinking that it could be rubbed into a piece of meat destined for a stove top or grill style of cooking, just not quite as thick.
Perhaps in the latter case it is referred to simply as "seasoning" - that you may or may not want to rub or massage into your meat.
 
If the rub or seasoning mixture has sugar in it, then it will probably burn if the meat is something you want a sear on it, like a steak for example, but no, I never remove the seasoning before cooking whether I want a sear or not. You can of course, that's up to you.
 
Wan, I also did not know that a "dry rub" usually meant a heavy crust of seasonings left on for a long cooking method.
Although I did know that the above is done - it did not prevent me from also thinking that it could be rubbed into a piece of meat destined for a stove top or grill style of cooking, just not quite as thick.
Perhaps in the latter case it is referred to simply as "seasoning" - that you may or may not want to rub or massage into your meat.

There's the rub (pardon the Shakespeare pun), a rub can be light or heavy, but often it is pretty heavy, and will burn in a skillet. I don't know how heavy Wan coated the meat, but anything more than a light "seasoning" would not be a good idea for pan frying. But, it would still be better to brush the excess off, than to wash it all off.

CD
 
Personally, if its a nice piece of meat I just use lots of salt and some pepper. No rub.

Central Texas BBQ uses what is nicknamed "Dalmatian Rub," which is just salt and pepper. The CT-BBQ purists will also never use BBQ sauce.

I completely agree with you, good meat doesn't need a heavy, six ingredient rub.

CD
 
i just did a rub now! letting it marinate overnight in the fridge, then into the oven it goes for low and slow cooking. i don't turn my oven on often whe it's this hot but tomorrow is supposed to be cooler.
 
Central Texas BBQ uses what is nicknamed "Dalmatian Rub," which is just salt and pepper. The CT-BBQ purists will also never use BBQ sauce.

I completely agree with you, good meat doesn't need a heavy, six ingredient rub.

CD
Good to know. I will also never use BBQ sauce - on anything what-so-ever!
 

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