Canning potatoes

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blissful

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We ran into a problem with some potatoes, 3 10lb bags seemed wet on the bottom. These were bought and they were very large russets.

To save what we could, decided to can them. Ended up with 7 qts and 7 pints and a quart of cooked potatoes. I think we lost about 6 lbs of potatoes.

It wasn't hard once we figured out how to use the apple peeler/slicer/corer, remove the slicer/corer part, and used them to peel the potatoes. I cut them in 1 inch cubes. Put them in water right away.

Put two kettles of water on the stove, one for blanching and one for boiling water to add to the potatoes.

Cook the potatoes more than a blanch really, 2-10 minutes, I cooked them about 3 minutes at boiling. Fill the jars. Add clean boiling water to 1 inch headspace.

Pressure can for 35 and 40 minutes for pints and qts. I was really pleased because I'd heard russets being so starchy make the water in the jars a milky white, but it stayed clear! And they all sealed (tattlers and metal lids). The pure white potatoes raw turned to a light golden color after canning.

It was our first time with potatoes. I've never bothered canning them before but now I'm glad we did!
 

larry_stewart

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Glad it worked out and you were able to salvage them. I may have tto look into pressure canning in the future. We have so many potatoes, but not the proper place to really store them, so we lose a lot over time. We make fries, pierogi and a few other things that are freezable , but we still have an over abundance of them. Part of the problem is I still grow enough for 4 people, and we're only 2 at home now, so I should probably cut back a bit.
 

blissful

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That's great bliss, glad you were able to rescue some. Do you have any idea how they got wet on the bottom?
Since these potatoes were THIS year's potatoes, they just came out of the field overly moist, which started creating condensation in the bags. Then that sets off rotting, or the beginning stages of rotting in the bottom of the bag. A few potatoes got soft and that will spread if left to sit.

These happened to be huge potatoes, about the size of 3 regular potatoes, which had to be cut down so it would fit in the peeler into half or thirds.

I think the problem was just the field conditions when harvested. We did find one potato with a hollow in the middle--from growing so fast, lots of water.
It's always a good idea to keep an eye on your potatoes and keep them in cool conditions if possible.

Larry, if you do decide to get a pressure canner, get a used one. 2 years ago, pressure canners were all bought out, people thought they'd garden and can....but many didn't, so there are lots of them available second hand now because they realized they had no time for them.
 

larry_stewart

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Larry, if you do decide to get a pressure canner, get a used one. 2 years ago, pressure canners were all bought out, people thought they'd garden and can....but many didn't, so there are lots of them available second hand now because they realized they had no time for them.
Ill definitely keep that in mind. I took such a leap this year in preserving and canning, I'm considering taking it to the next level. I still dont trust my self %100 but I get such a kick out of seeing how much I can store from the garden for use throughout the winter, until the garden kicks in again next season.
 

taxlady

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Ill definitely keep that in mind. I took such a leap this year in preserving and canning, I'm considering taking it to the next level. I still dont trust my self %100 but I get such a kick out of seeing how much I can store from the garden for use throughout the winter, until the garden kicks in again next season.
If you don't quite trust yourself with the pressure canning, start out by pressure canning some stuff that you have previously water bath canned. You know that will work, 'cause it doesn't really need the pressure. Then you can get a feel for the pressure canning and have more confidence the next time. That's pretty much what I did.
 

cookiecrafter

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Larry, if you do decide to get a pressure canner, get a used one. 2 years ago, pressure canners were all bought out, people thought they'd garden and can....but many didn't, so there are lots of them available second hand now because they realized they had no time for them.
How would I go about finding people want to part with them?
 

blissful

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The last time I wanted jars and a canner (for a niece) I asked on nextdoor.com and facebook. I listed what I would pay per jar/size and the canner (it was a waterbath), for $10. For a pressure canner it would depend on what kind-all american are more expensive, and other types you can price online. So then go to market place on facebook, look on craigslist, search on nextdoor.com, there are many for sale. Garage sales are an idea. Check the price new, then look at the price it is listed for used, make sure it is a canner and not a cooker (and a lot of people selling them don't know the difference). https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/chicago/pressure-canners/
 

blissful

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This one for instance is listed as a cooker, but it is a canner. This is the type of model I have.
 

taxlady

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This one for instance is listed as a cooker, but it is a canner. This is the type of model I have.
Well, that one has a label that says cooker/canner. I had a Presto pressure cooker that worked fine as a pressure cooker. I don't remember if it had a label calling it both.
 

blissful

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A canner will be at the smallest 21 qt size, this fits 7 qt jars. (unless you use an electric new fangled one, those only fit 4 jars)
 

cookiecrafter

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The last time I wanted jars and a canner (for a niece) I asked on nextdoor.com and facebook. I listed what I would pay per jar/size and the canner (it was a waterbath), for $10. For a pressure canner it would depend on what kind-all american are more expensive, and other types you can price online. So then go to market place on facebook, look on craigslist, search on nextdoor.com, there are many for sale. Garage sales are an idea. Check the price new, then look at the price it is listed for used, make sure it is a canner and not a cooker (and a lot of people selling them don't know the difference). https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/chicago/dnd foopressure-canners/
Thanks for the info. A friend knocked on my door early. He had a brand new canner, cases of jars & lids, and food. He gave me the cookbook to read while he unpacked his load. He peeled, chopped, cooked and filled the jars with all sorts of things. Then gave it all the canner finally. Like you said people buy and simply don't get around to using it.
 

larry_stewart

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Got my pressure canner yesterday ( went with a Presto). HAs long as I have the time, I'll be canning potatoes this weekend. I'm hoping its a success, causeIt will sold the problem of trying to eat up all our potatoes before the sprout or rot each year. This has been an exceptional potato year. If it works out Ill be doing string beans next year too, as we always have way more than we need. I'll also look into pressure canning other things too. I'm actually excited about this.
 

blissful

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Congrats @larry_stewart ! That's great.
I noticed in the FB canning group, some of the people canned chunks of potatoes in an herb broth. I haven't tried that yet. I've only canned potatoes in water. I can't wait to hear how it goes for you.
 

larry_stewart

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Congrats @larry_stewart ! That's great.
I noticed in the FB canning group, some of the people canned chunks of potatoes in an herb broth. I haven't tried that yet. I've only canned potatoes in water. I can't wait to hear how it goes for you.
Im taking baby steps. Knowing me, I'll spend the rest of tonight reading, rereading the instructions. Watching a few videos.... Just doing basic potatoes for now. But I cant wait to expand into other things. As you know, the water bath method is limiting. This opens up many new opportunities to can. Ill probably experiment during the winter, so I'm ready to go once the garden kicks in again.
 

larry_stewart

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Messages
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We ran into a problem with some potatoes, 3 10lb bags seemed wet on the bottom. These were bought and they were very large russets.

To save what we could, decided to can them. Ended up with 7 qts and 7 pints and a quart of cooked potatoes. I think we lost about 6 lbs of potatoes.

It wasn't hard once we figured out how to use the apple peeler/slicer/corer, remove the slicer/corer part, and used them to peel the potatoes. I cut them in 1 inch cubes. Put them in water right away.

Put two kettles of water on the stove, one for blanching and one for boiling water to add to the potatoes.

Cook the potatoes more than a blanch really, 2-10 minutes, I cooked them about 3 minutes at boiling. Fill the jars. Add clean boiling water to 1 inch headspace.

Pressure can for 35 and 40 minutes for pints and qts. I was really pleased because I'd heard russets being so starchy make the water in the jars a milky white, but it stayed clear! And they all sealed (tattlers and metal lids). The pure white potatoes raw turned to a light golden color after canning.

It was our first time with potatoes. I've never bothered canning them before but now I'm glad we did!
Did you add anything to the water other than the potatoes ? Ive seen salt ( which they said is just for taste), and I also read ascorbic acid to prevent discoloring ? Did you try any other types of potatoes other than Russet? Did you out the potatoes directly into boiling water tto ' blanch' or did you put them, get them up too a boil, and then time the 3 minutes ? Sorry for all the Q's, I just like hearing from someone I know and trust, who did it ( In addition to reading the manuals and approved sites).
 

blissful

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Mar 25, 2008
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Right, salt is just for taste.
I haven't tried ascorbic acid.
I just tried russets, because that is what I needed to can. Other types can 'better' because there is less starch in the water, and because they are more waxy.
I kept the just peeled potatoes in the sink full of water while heating the kettles of water on the stove. Then when the water was boiling I put in the potatoes. Then wait until it boils and then only 3 minutes of boiling. Then put in the jars and fill with clean boiling water.
 

larry_stewart

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Dec 25, 2006
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Right, salt is just for taste.
I haven't tried ascorbic acid.
I just tried russets, because that is what I needed to can. Other types can 'better' because there is less starch in the water, and because they are more waxy.
I kept the just peeled potatoes in the sink full of water while heating the kettles of water on the stove. Then when the water was boiling I put in the potatoes. Then wait until it boils and then only 3 minutes of boiling. Then put in the jars and fill with clean boiling water.
Great. Looks like today is the day Im diving in (or possibly tomorrow). Ill let you know how it turns out.
 

blissful

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5,048
I don't know yet. I haven't opened any.
@bethzaring might be able to give more information...
If I blanch/boil longer, how is the texture?
If I can russets compared to waxy potatoes, how is the texture?
What we use the potatoes for, which dishes?
 
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