Chocolate Souffles with White Chocolate Rum Sauce

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mish

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This recipe is from one of my favorites, Cooking Light. While I haven't tried it yet, it looked so irresistable, I wanted to share it with the great bakers here (waving at PA :-])

Butter-flavored cooking spray
2 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 cups skim milk
3/4 cup sugar
2/3 cup Dutch process or unsweetened cocoa
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 ounce semisweet chocolate
3 large egg yolks
6 large egg whites
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/3 cup sugar
1 (3-ounce) bar premium white chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoons skim milk
1 tablespoon white rum

Preheat oven to 400º.

Coat 8 (6-ounce) ramekins with cooking spray; sprinkle with 2 tablespoons sugar. Place on a baking sheet; set aside.

Combine 1 1/2 cups milk, 3/4 cup sugar, cocoa, flour, and salt in a large saucepan; cook 5 minutes over medium-high heat, stirring constantly with a whisk until mixture thickens and comes to a boil. Cook an additional 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; add semisweet chocolate, stirring until melted.

Gradually add chocolate mixture to egg yolks, stirring well. Return mixture to pan. Cook 2 minutes over medium heat, stirring constantly. Spoon mixture into a large bowl; cool to room temperature, stirring occasionally.

Beat egg whites and cream of tartar at high speed of a mixer until foamy. Add 1/3 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, beating until stiff peaks form. Gently fold one-fourth of egg white mixture into chocolate mixture; gently fold in remaining egg white mixture. Spoon batter evenly into prepared ramekins. Bake soufflés at 400º for 20 minutes or until puffy and set.

Combine white chocolate and 2 tablespoons milk in a small saucepan; cook over low heat until chocolate melts. Remove from heat; stir in rum. Cut into each soufflé with a spoon; pour 1 tablespoon sauce over each soufflé. Serve immediately.
 

PA Baker

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Oh, wow! Thanks again Mish!:) I get Cooking Light but somehow missed or don't remember this one. It's being copied and pasted immediately and made soon!
 

mish

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You're very welcome, PA. This recipe goes back to approx. 1997. Let me know how you like it. Thinking it would look lovely surrounded by strawberries. I'm not quite the baker, but it does look pretty simple. I'ved never worked with cream of tartar before, but cooking is fun when I have the time to experiment.
 

PA Baker

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Cream of tartar is easy to work with. Here it's just used to help the egg whites form peaks.


I've only gotten Cooking Light for the last couple of years which explains why I hadn't seen these. I have so many recipes clipped and saved from the last two years I can't imagine how many I'd have piled up if I had 8 years worth!:LOL:
 

mish

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PA Baker said:
Cream of tartar is easy to work with. Here it's just used to help the egg whites form peaks.


I've only gotten Cooking Light for the last couple of years which explains why I hadn't seen these. I have so many recipes clipped and saved from the last two years I can't imagine how many I'd have piled up if I had 8 years worth!:LOL:

Thank you again PA. Have seen cream of tartar in hundreds of recipes as a thickening agent (even slow cooker recipes). I'll have to look around the market & see if it's in the spice section? (duh) - or post a question. I have a soft spot in my cooking heart when it comes to souffles -- such a delicate labor of love. So many recipes...so little time to cook. I'm going thru/loading all my disks/cooking programs that date back awhile. I will try to post the very bestest of the best. If I made every recipe I've ever saved, I'd be immortal.

Oh, &, raspberries would be another favorite accompanyment (sp?).
 

Alix

Everymom
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Dear God, thank you for putting such smart and wonderful people on this site...thank you also for the amazing recipes these people post!

Mish, once again...copying...pasting! I am actually drooling! Oh, and I vote raspberries too!
 

Raine

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NC
Cooking Light, one of our favorites. I have every issue of CL.
 

PA Baker

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Here's a little explanation of cream of tartar that I found:

CREAM OF TARTAR

Tartaric acid is a brownish-red acid powder (potassium bitartrate) that is precipitated onto the walls of casks used to age wine. When refined into a white acid powder, ‘cream of tartar’, it is used in baking.

Cream of tartar is an acid powder. Combined with baking SODA it makes baking POWDER.

Cream of tartar is also used to give a creamier texture to sugary things like candy and frosting and to stabilize and increase the volume of beaten egg whites.

Cream of tartar can be used to clean brass and copper cookware.
 

mish

Washing Up
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Oct 4, 2004
Messages
4,355
Alix said:
Dear God, thank you for putting such smart and wonderful people on this site...thank you also for the amazing recipes these people post!

Mish, once again...copying...pasting! I am actually drooling! Oh, and I vote raspberries too!

Thank U Alix!!! What would I do without my oreo stash while reading thru these great recipes. lol

Rainee, wanted to mention, read thru lots n lots of your posts...fan here. Remember the days when cooking light had the recipe makeovers? Particularly if you had a favorite restaurant recipe...they'd convert it. Back then the craze was low fat (which I'm sorta still into) rather than the carb thing.
 

Raine

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Yep, remember that. CL is what got me started growing herbs.
 

mish

Washing Up
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Oct 4, 2004
Messages
4,355
PA Baker said:
Here's a little explanation of cream of tartar that I found:

CREAM OF TARTAR

Tartaric acid is a brownish-red acid powder (potassium bitartrate) that is precipitated onto the walls of casks used to age wine. When refined into a white acid powder, ‘cream of tartar’, it is used in baking.

Cream of tartar is an acid powder. Combined with baking SODA it makes baking POWDER.

Cream of tartar is also used to give a creamier texture to sugary things like candy and frosting and to stabilize and increase the volume of beaten egg whites.

Cream of tartar can be used to clean brass and copper cookware.

Thanks PA. Guess I'll have to poke around the market & figure out what aisle it's in. (Probably not in the toothpaste aisle - tartar control - lol - groannnnn). Hate to sound dumb, but thought maybe it might be? in the spice dept. Reminds me also of a question about saffron...since it's so expensive, wonder do the markets keep it locked up in the manger's office? But, that's a whole different question/forum. Cooking always keeps my brain thinking & my lips smakin.
 

PA Baker

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Messages
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Location
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Cream of tartar is right in with rest of the spices.

I think you probably would have to go to a specialty market to buy saffron. I've never seen it in the standard, large supermarkets around me. I'm sure Penzeys Spices has it too.
 

Alix

Everymom
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Messages
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Location
Edmonton, Alberta
Boo to the tartar control mish! You are looking for a little teeny box about 3 inches tall and 1 1/2 inches wide. White and blue striped if I am not mistaken. Look near the baking powder and stuff. Good luck!
 
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