Found an outstanding way to cook ham!

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Katie H

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Don't know where I found this but probably somewhere on the 'net. Cooked a bone-in ham a few days ago and it was amazing.

I put the ham into a large paper bag and tucked the bag securely around the ham, then placed it onto a baking rack in a roasting pan.

Set the oven to 325F degrees and baked the ham for 18 minutes per pound. It was a 7-pound ham, and when it was done, it was juicy and could darned near be cut by a spoon.

Gonna do this again!!
 
I remember that from way back - so far back, that it was my Aunt, or someone else that did it at family outings. I was young, and wasn't really looking at cooking things, at those outings - just getting into trouble somewhere! But it was delicious - the ham is what I always liked the most!
 
When I was growing up we used brown paper bags for a variety of things in the kitchen.

I’m not sure it was a good idea then and I would be even more concerned today.

I wonder if similar results could be obtained by wrapping the ham in parchment paper. 🤔

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I have seen it done with a fresh ham. I have zero issue with grocery store paper bags. I use them for draining fried foods to save on paper towels.
Trouble is, they are not as absorbent as they were in the past. Must be coated to strengthen them?
I crumble them up and that seems to improve their absorption.
 
Was it a “fresh” ham (more of a bone-in pork roast) or a bone-in smoked ham?
 
I think I head somewhere that butcher paper would work. Probably a lot cheaper than parchment.

CD
 
I totally get why you enjoyed making this recipe. The ham on the bone cooking method you described sounds pretty straightforward, so I'll definitely give it a try.
 
Same principle as those big plastic bags they used to sell for cooking turkeys years ago.

My family still uses those bags. However, I now pull that stupid plastic red thing out of the bird, and use a real probe thermometer.

The bag itself is not a bad thing., if you use it right.

CD
 
My hams always turn out dry, so I definitely need to try something else. I also heard cooking a whole, bone-in ham in the crockpot works as well, and produces a nice juicy ham, since the crock holds in all that moisture. That's how I was planning to cook my next one, but the paper bag idea is intriguing.
 
My hams always turn out dry, so I definitely need to try something else. I also heard cooking a whole, bone-in ham in the crockpot works as well, and produces a nice juicy ham, since the crock holds in all that moisture. That's how I was planning to cook my next one, but the paper bag idea is intriguing.
Most hams you buy are precooked. All you need to do is warm them. Cooking a ham for any longer just dries it out. Even a crockpot dries it out. Just because you see a lot of liquid in the bottom of the pot, doesn't mean the meat is moist - its just wet - and that's a huge difference. Just warm your ham gently and forget about all the other hogwash.
 
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