Garden 2024

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You're right but I was more concerned about the 200 yr old house itself. Plan was to tear it down and rebuild, but he promised to keep and incorporate the logs somehow on pain of my haunting him, LOL.
Then they changed their minds and were just going to renovate, then plans changed again as the parents had to move in - so down it came to become a multi-generational home. But told by the neighbours he did keep the logs somehow. Have been invited to come see it anytime. I'm sure it's lovely and maybe I should, to get closure. Crazy how we get attached to inanimate objects.
I hope they didn’t just tear the house down. A house that old is full of materials that can be reused. People will pay dearly for old doors and hardware.

CD
 
I'm pretty sure they did, although I had done lots of renovations - the logs, floors (some more than 8" wide), stair case, were pretty much all originals. I redid the front door - big project in that it was redone in various ways several times. In the end I sent it out to be finished. Was glad I did because the price included rehanging which turned out to be tricky. I took it down and delivered to them, but they returned and rehung it. It was gorgeous and well worth the price.
 
My cherries haven't done well this year, due to the rain, but one of my fruit trees (nespolo) that never ever produces, is actually full of fruits (nespole) this year, although not in very good condition.

Google translator says they're called "loquats" in English, I had never seen these fruits before until I came to live in Italy, they're very popular in our areas.These fruits ripen in Spring, usually May.
 

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Our garden is scant atm. 3 months till spring so I dont know what will be going on in the garden. Our 2 story house is going on the market we're downsizing . I think the wife is taking " stuff " with us like raspberry canes.
We will see.

Russ
 
We put in 12 of our odd tomato plants today, a white tomato, amazon chocolate tomato, and the amish paste tomato. I put in 70 okra seeds, our first year growing these, I'm scared. I put in parsley and kale. Then we had a storm w/rain, then it cleared, then another storm! Tomorrow we'll have sunshine.
 
Okra is my last to go in the garden . Started the seeds in cells a few weeks back indoors. Cells now outside hardening. Likely will go into the ground this weekend. Sweet potatoes were available about 2 weeks earlier than previous years. With the warmer weather projected, I got them in the groundless week. First signs of scapes on the garlic.
 
I planted out 10 lettuce plug plants today. By tomorrow, who knows how many will survive after the slugs discover them! (Also have a jalepeno and a mini cucumber just gone out - both look pretty poorly.)

Meanwhile, my 6 strawberry plants are still alive but not looking great. One has a single flower. The rest, nothing at all.

I don't think I will be dining on home-grown produce this year! (Haven't got my tomato plants yet - I usually get a summer's worth of tomatoes so there is still hope there.) Gotta say though, the rain has been excessive this year and the summer is not looking promising.
 
@KatyCooks we received 3 inches of rain, yesterday!

We finished planting the peppers today, lots of 'em. And beets, and purple mustard, and swiss chard. I might have planted more too but I'm dizzy now and sweat is running in my eyes...who knows what I put in? Maybe chicken seed and I'll be growing chickens. ;)
 
@KatyCooks we received 3 inches of rain, yesterday!

We finished planting the peppers today, lots of 'em. And beets, and purple mustard, and swiss chard. I might have planted more too but I'm dizzy now and sweat is running in my eyes...who knows what I put in? Maybe chicken seed and I'll be growing chickens. ;)
3 inches of rain? :eek: I hope your new chicken seed chickens can swim!! :)
 
I was totally surprised by the 3 inches of rain.....so I checked the flood stage of the fox river, and it is only at 4 feet, and flood stages are at 6 and 8, so, we're fine. The water didn't even collect in the gullies around properties. The ground is wet though.
We planted yesterday but today starting at 10 am, RAIN. So the rain keeps coming. Tomorrow will be sunny, and more planting.
Ducks, geese, chickens...feel free to stop in.
 
The rain really did a number on the garlic that looked so promising. I ended up pulling all up as they were not reviving. Now I have a passel of marble-sized garlic. Do I put it somewhere until fall and try to replant it for next spring?

The rain killed all but three of my onion sets. 😭

I also planted 10 okra this past week.
 
The rain really did a number on the garlic that looked so promising. I ended up pulling all up as they were not reviving. Now I have a passel of marble-sized garlic. Do I put it somewhere until fall and try to replant it for next spring?

The rain killed all but three of my onion sets. 😭

I also planted 10 okra this past week.
That stinks! I hate When Im looking so forward to successful crops then Mother Nature pulls it out from under your feet. It's so discouraging. It does make us appreciate all the farmers who deal with this for a living. Not sure if those garlic will produce anything substantial .

I got my Okra in yesterday. I usually don't get them in for another week, but they were getting big in the cells and drying out too easily, so I figured they'd have a better chance in the ground, and the projected weather for the next week appears like it will cooperate. I had to rip up my lettuce to do so. They lettuce was starting to flop over a bit and getting very buggy ( and were where I wanted my Okra to go). Now that the veggies are in, Im focusing on flowers and landscape ( everyone is coming over my house for fathers day, so I have a few weeks to get things looking good.

Broccoli and cauliflower about side of a quarter. Managing to keep cabbage moths and aphids off. Looks like my cukes and squash passed the cut worm stage and are staring to take off.
 
That stinks! I hate When Im looking so forward to successful crops then Mother Nature pulls it out from under your feet. It's so discouraging. It does make us appreciate all the farmers who deal with this for a living. Not sure if those garlic will produce anything substantial .

I got my Okra in yesterday. I usually don't get them in for another week, but they were getting big in the cells and drying out too easily, so I figured they'd have a better chance in the ground, and the projected weather for the next week appears like it will cooperate. I had to rip up my lettuce to do so. They lettuce was starting to flop over a bit and getting very buggy ( and were where I wanted my Okra to go). Now that the veggies are in, Im focusing on flowers and landscape ( everyone is coming over my house for fathers day, so I have a few weeks to get things looking good.

Broccoli and cauliflower about side of a quarter. Managing to keep cabbage moths and aphids off. Looks like my cukes and squash passed the cut worm stage and are staring to take off.

What do you do with your okra? I always use it in my Cajun gumbo, and I love fried okra -- chicken fried steak, mashed potatoes and fried okra is one of my favorite meals.

But that's it. Otherwise, I don't like okra.

CD
 
What do you do with your okra? I always use it in my Cajun gumbo, and I love fried okra -- chicken fried steak, mashed potatoes and fried okra is one of my favorite meals.

But that's it. Otherwise, I don't like okra.

CD
My wife loves eating It raw.
As far as cooking goes, I have a vegetable soup that I make that I through a handful of cut up okra in. I'll occasionally make a ' gumbo' like dish. I've tried several Indian fried okra dishes, which weren't bad, but weren't good enough to make again ( Ive had similar dishes at Indian restaurants that I felt the same about, so it wasn't that I screwed the dish up). Other than that, that's about it. It freezes well, so Ill usually cut them up and freeze them for future use during the year.
 
Both the flower gardens we put we used American Meadows flower mix, 15 kinds or so, half annual and half perennial. They turned out great last year. Today we went through both of them, took out any dandelions and thistles that took root, roughed up soil where things hadn't sprouted, spread more seeds, annual and perennial. It took us less than 2 hours. It started raining again.
 
I love okra. Fried, in soups/stews/gumbo, in Mediterranean dishes with tomatoes or potatoes or both, pasta sauces, etc. I don't like it raw. It has to be void of of sliminess.

Blissful, dandelion heads are yummy battered and fried!
 
I love okra. Fried, in soups/stews/gumbo, in Mediterranean dishes with tomatoes or potatoes or both, pasta sauces, etc. I don't like it raw. It has to be void of of sliminess.

Blissful, dandelion heads are yummy battered and fried!
The okra is our adventure this year....we didn't start plants, just the seeds and they might be in a little late for a big harvest. We might get some though. We've never had to fit them into our meals, here, 'up north'.

Oh the dandelions were past flowering, I thought about keeping leaves but we had to hurry so I didn't.

We had a spell of no rain, so we planted the last of the east garden with fennel starts (wintersowing) and summer savory. Then zucchini, both yellow and green. Then kale and parsley, some red/purple mustard, long island squash and gray hopi squash. I think that is it. We put in more summer savory next to the deck with a few starts (winter sowing) of sage (I need sage!) Summer savory stands in for thyme if I'm out, but my creeping thyme (two year plants, nice) IS edible and it has a good scent and flavor, so I'll have piles of it to dry this summer.
 
Tarragon (have I mentioned this before?) left a huge plant back at the farm. Had to cut it back 2 sometimes 3 times a year - it just went wild. Then I could not get any here! 3 summer in a row - no nursery had any. Then this year, everybody had them - after I special ordered and paid for them - at a more expensive price... grrr. Well bought two more, figured out of the four I might get one to overwinter and go crazy. I love tarragon, don't use a lot but it is sooooooooooo good. (btw- tarragon means 'little dragon' :whistling

Sage - yep, that one too. Had a beautiful plant that kept coming back year after year. I gave many a torn up roots to friends. Another favourite. Didn't bring any with me and although there are plenty in the nurseries - none seem to survive the winter here. It is also MILDER here than at the farm. Go figure - and up here both these herbs are considered annuals.
 
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