Seeking Recommendations on Wood Fired Pizza Oven

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pedevowi

Assistant Cook
Joined
Nov 29, 2022
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United States
Hello all.

I'm embarking on a culinary adventure and contemplating the purchase of a wood-fired pizza oven for my backyard. The variety in the market is overwhelming, so I'm turning to this community for some seasoned advice! If you've had experience with wood-fired pizza ovens, I'd love to hear your recommendations.

Considerations like ease of use, temperature control, build quality, and, of course, authentic wood-fired flavor are all crucial factors. Are there specific brands or models that have stood out in terms of performance and durability?

Additionally, I'm curious about the maintenance aspect. How easy are these ovens to clean and maintain?

Budget is also a consideration, so if you've found a hidden gem that offers great value for money, please do share.

Your insights will not only aid my decision-making process but could also benefit others in the community who are on a similar quest for the perfect wood-fired pizza experience.
 
in my youth (long story . . . ) I got smitten by wood fired baking ovens.
fast forward decades . . . as I also entertained my own wood fired jewel in the backyard . . . I did some volunteer work with local "fair" organizations that raised money by selling 'brick oven baked' breads.

obviously size dependent, but it took 48 hours to (SLOWLY) get the wood fired oven up to temp to bake bread - pizza would not be happily baked at those temps . . .

and after it was up to temp & "stable" - someone had to be there every four hours +/- to tend and feed it more wood.

the bottom line is: a wood fired baking oven is very romantic, and very impractical unless you are in the business of a constant bake cycle.
for a pizza "now and then" - totally unworkable....
 
in my youth (long story . . . ) I got smitten by wood fired baking ovens.
fast forward decades . . . as I also entertained my own wood fired jewel in the backyard . . . I did some volunteer work with local "fair" organizations that raised money by selling 'brick oven baked' breads.

obviously size dependent, but it took 48 hours to (SLOWLY) get the wood fired oven up to temp to bake bread - pizza would not be happily baked at those temps . . .

and after it was up to temp & "stable" - someone had to be there every four hours +/- to tend and feed it more wood.

the bottom line is: a wood fired baking oven is very romantic, and very impractical unless you are in the business of a constant bake cycle.
for a pizza "now and then" - totally unworkable....

We have a wood - fired oven outside in our yard,but I haven't used it since I lost my husband suddenly three years ago, I'm no good at all, haven't got the patience. He used to make delicious pizzas in there . The real, original Napolitan pizza is baked in a wood-fired oven. The taste is really different, nothing compares to it.
 
I have a commercial BBQ that pumps out 80,000 BTU and I heat a stone and it takes about 3 minutes to cook with great results. My kitchen oven at the highest temp 500, takes about 12 minutes, that works for me.
 
I agree with @dcSaute
I looked at building one and then decided that I wouldn't be able to eat all that I would make in the oven (I dislike waste, even heat)
Start with pizza, follow with bread, casseroles etc and finish with drying herbs.

If your goal is a good pizza, maybe check out the Ooni range.
I got one of the earlier ones and they do work a dream. 10-15 min ore-heat, 1.5-2.0 minutes for a pizza.

If you like the romance of the wood fired stove, then go for it.
Perhaps have a look at pizzamaking.org. They should have plenty info there
 
I would start with some sort of campfire Dutch oven pizza, rolls, bread recipes before making a major investment in an actual wood fired oven.
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We have a member, @roadfix, who built a brick oven in his backyard. He seems to be happy to use it for a variety of things, but not so much for pizza. I found an old post of his where he says it usually isn't worth the amount of hardwood required to bake a pizza for three minutes.
 
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