Smoked and reverse seared wagyu sirloin

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Kloeshuman

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Joined
Feb 11, 2023
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Michigan
This turned out so good! Used pecan because that's all I had. Was so tender...ended up having steak and eggs
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for lunch
 

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One of my favorite meals, steak and eggs and I generally have that for breakfast. Haven't smoked a steak per se but smoked beef in general it's pretty tasty, I'll have to smoke some steaks.
 
So I used my SnS travel kettle, I set up to smoke around 225/250 with pecan wood in with the charcoal. Then when I hit about 120/125 degrees I put it directly over the coals to sear..then I pulled it and let it rest while I cooked the eggs. Then I sliced it length wise. Only used salt and pepper to cover it before it went in the smoker
 
Yeah with steak my go to is normally hanger steak then ribeye's and striploins. I normally pull my steaks for reverse sear around 110.
 
I was just below 120, I like medium rare to even leaning more rare. I was happy with it
Not judging, I like to get a good sear with high flames when I can which means I leave it on the heat longer and internal temps normally end up around the 125-130 range.

These chefs that pull out the propane gun to color sous vide beef, what the hell is that lol.
 
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Sorry, but a propane gun definitely achieves the Maillard reaction.

Professional chefs use it all the time.

About the only time I would agree with that, is for super super thin steaks that are done sous-vid. For the life of me though, I cannot see why someone would sous-vid a super thin steak? Heat water, bag, cook, remove, light up the blow torch, sear, serve. When heat grill, sear, serve is so fast.
Steaks seared on/in a pan/grill also have the advantage of the taste of the rendered fat from the pan/grill. JMHO.

Not saying a torch doesn't come in handy, there are still many uses for them.
 
The blowtorches give a better result like the one jennyema linked, but the ones where there used for creme brulee are the one's I'm specifically talking about and I see them used all the time on many sous vide sites and many cooking shows.
 
So, dragnlaw, basically you are saying that a pan is a better way to get the Maillard reaction than a torch. That is not the same thing as a propane torch doesn't create Maillard reaction.
 
If you want the taste, I truly believe so.
But... after what Pictonguy said, I will retract if they are really using a regular garage tool torch. Because, believe me, I've had one of those useless tiny torches they sell for kitchen use.
 
These chefs that pull out the propane gun to color sous vide beef, what the hell is that lol.

Oh, you mean me? I use a torch with a searsall, sometimes, or a ripping hot cast iron pan other times, to sear a sous vide steak. That's what the hell that is.

CD
 
The blowtorches give a better result like the one jennyema linked, but the ones where there used for creme brulee are the one's I'm specifically talking about and I see them used all the time on many sous vide sites and many cooking shows.

Those are usually kitchen torches which use butane, not propane. They will work on steaks, too.

CD
 
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So, dragnlaw, basically you are saying that a pan is a better way to get the Maillard reaction than a torch. That is not the same thing as a propane torch doesn't create Maillard reaction.

Like I said, I've done it both ways, as well is the charcoal chimney method and right on the Weber kettle.

CD
 
Here is a steak cooked sous vide, then seared with a torch. Notice how the pink in the medium-rare center goes all the way to the edge. No grey area. That's what a torch does well. There is definitely a Maillard reaction showing.

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CD
 
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