Sweet potato fries

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Sir_Loin_of_Beef

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Exactly.
French TOAST is not done in a toaster - but people still call it toast.

People give the same name to a recipe even if it is done in some other way. They want people to know that the end result will be basically the same as the title.
Toasting is a method of cooking, not a function of an appliance.

The end result is NOT basically the same as the title, just like a mock apple pie made with Ritz crackers is NOT an apple pie.
 

Sir_Loin_of_Beef

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Yes, that is the one I use, because it matches my frothing pitcher.

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It is also 1 quart larger than the one you are considering and I believe a lighter weight steel, but yes, anything is better than an old tomato can.
 

taxlady

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I'd end up taking the jar out of fridge, pouring in my hot grease, and wondering why taxlady's didn't break like mine did.

Maybe because she let it cool down slightly before pouring it into the jar? ;)

I usually take the jar out of the fridge before I start frying the bacon. I may or may not let the bacon fat cool a bit, but I make sure to pour it into the middle, so the jar is a bit protected by the previous bacon fat. I tend to pour it slowly, so the cold fat already in the jar starts melting and mixing with the hot fat and cooling it off. But, I find that canning jars don't usually break from a bit of thermal shock. Also, I don't always keep the bacon fat in the fridge. :ohmy:
 

GotGarlic

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I usually take the jar out of the fridge before I start frying the bacon. I may or may not let the bacon fat cool a bit, but I make sure to pour it into the middle, so the jar is a bit protected by the previous bacon fat. I tend to pour it slowly, so the cold fat already in the jar starts melting and mixing with the hot fat and cooling it off. But, I find that canning jars don't usually break from a bit of thermal shock. Also, I don't always keep the bacon fat in the fridge. :ohmy:
Yes, I pour it into the center, too. I used to have a metal can with a strainer, similar to the one SLoB has, but I don't have it anymore and I don't know what happened to it. I used to keep that on the counter like my mom did [emoji16]
 

Bitser

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Ksm, I once met (on-line) a person who also lived on a boat. She had several pressure cookers that she swore she could not get along without.

Did some cruising from New Zealand and some from Canada. The value of a pressure cooker is a) that it saves fuel; b) that less water boils off so you don't get as much condensation in the cabin; and c) the reduced cook time means that if you're cooking while minding the helm or trimming, you can check the cooker at regular intervals and attend to your tasks.

I've also done logistics for high-altitude expeditions and always get several pressure cookers for the base camp. Rice, beans, and other dry staples don't get done at high altitudes, owing to a lower boiling point.
 

dragnlaw

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Canning jar, kept in fridge. Just pour in the hot fat. There is usually a hole in the middle of the fat where I've dug out some fat to use. If not then "maybe" I'll grab a spoon or something to put in - but only if I really think there is enough to cause termal shock.
 

Roll_Bones

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I said "...on a rack.." The bacon never touches the rendered fat. After the bacon is cooked, I remove it and the rack and pour the rendered fat into my bacon squeezin's container so I can eventually FRY stuff in it.

51ZBIlHwj9L._AC_UL480_FMwebp_QL65_.jpg
Do you refrigerate the fat? I do, but have seen others leave it out of the fridge.
I try to save all bacon fat but hate the tiny particles that make it through my fine strainer. Its still nice, but would prefer an almost pure white result after chilling. I am considering using a coffee filter. It (fat) would need to be quite hot to make it through the filter.
I know when I make my chili oil I sometimes allow it to drain overnight. Its very slow.

If you know how to use a deep fryer properly, you don't get greasy food.
Totally agree. I fry a lot. Deep fry. My food comes out crispy and does not retain much oil. The proper temperature and a cooling/draining rack is my method.
I don't use the stove anymore. I have two Fry Daddy's so one is always available.
I also do not refrigerate the left over oil. I leave it in the fryer and reuse until it gets to nasty to use anymore.
My MIL used to put the fryer with plastic lid directly into her fridge. Of course after it was cool.

Thanks, mate. Having no desire for a electrified bucket of rancid oil taking up counter space, I don't need to learn how to use a deep fryer properly.
Check?
You know I have been meaning to ask about this rancid thing. I keep cooking oils in colored wine bottles on my prep counter. The main containers reside in my cabinet.
I reuse deep frying oil. (soybean) I have yet to find any rancid oil and I am no spring chicken. Or maybe I have and did not know?
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Cooking oils will go rancid over time, when exposed to oxygen. It takes a bit of time tough. This is why food grade mineral oil is used for lubricating moving parts on slicers, coating carbon steel blades, and seasoning/protecting wooden cutting boards.

That being said, if cooking oil is frequently used until it is no longer viable for frying, it generally won't have time to go rancid. If you'd ever tasted, or smelled rancid oil, you'd know it. I remember as a child occasionally finding a rancid peanut every now and again (peanut oil) and the flavor was truly disgusting, and very strong. It takes a lot of rinsing to get that flavor out of your mouth.

And Bitzer, Though I have been impressed with your posts, and ingenuity as a member of the DC community, your posts on this subject seem almost condescending. Deep frying, pan frying, or even poaching in oil are all valid cooking methods used by people all over the world. I believe it would be difficult, for instance, to make tempura shrimp without frying in oil. I'm thinking any battered dish, be it chicken, fish, or even a Monte Cristo sandwich would not be possible without frying. And what about fried ice cream?

It's true that none of the foods just mentioned are essential, however, they do make life a little richer. So if you don't like frying, then that's your choice, and I'll be the first to support that decision. Just allow others to fry if they wish to, without commenting negatively on the subject.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 
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Bitser

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Woods Landing, Wyoming
I enjoy deep-fried food in restaurants, where the fryer is in daily use. But in a home kitchen (ours) it would get heated up maybe once each week. So for me, it would be a waste of counter space, etc. That's why I look for alternative methods to have potatoes, shrimp, etc. that are similarly crisp outside and tender inside.

I think air fryers work on the same principle as the roasting I do in the toaster oven, with the same result.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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I enjoy deep-fried food in restaurants, where the fryer is in daily use. But in a home kitchen (ours) it would get heated up maybe once each week. So for me, it would be a waste of counter space, etc. That's why I look for alternative methods to have potatoes, shrimp, etc. that are similarly crisp outside and tender inside.

I think air fryers work on the same principle as the roasting I do in the toaster oven, with the same result.

I understand your point completely. i do fry t home, but use a large ceramic ditch oven, or my wok, and a splatter shield. The used il is spilled onto newsprint under the cooking grate of my Webber, s it burns long enough to really get a load of charcoal going, and saves me from having to dispose of the cooking oil. I also dry-fry in heavy cat iron, again with the splatter shield. I prefer grilling over charcoal, however, my Webber is in Mi, and I'm in MT.

I hope you didn't take offence at my previous post. Even innocent thoughts, with no malicious intend, can be misread in the written word, as you can't here voice tones, see facial expressions, or any of the cues that help us communicate with each other. When I was at sea, I'd write a letter to my wife. It took 6 weeks for mail to get from the ship to her, and the same the other way. One of us would misread something, and it could fester until I got into port and could make a phone call to clear things up.

It's true that the pen can be mightier than the sword. To many relationships, be they with friends, or loved ones, have been ruined due to a misunderstanding of written correspondence. And yep, I just earned my DC name yet again.:LOL:

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 
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