What is your opinion on beating eggs?

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When beatings eggs do you want them completely blended?

  • Yes, no white blotches please

    Votes: 13 59.1%
  • No, I like my blotches

    Votes: 1 4.5%
  • Who cares, either way is good with me

    Votes: 8 36.4%

  • Total voters
    22

1006gm

Assistant Cook
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
20
Location
New Jersey
What are your thoughs on beating eggs, for lets say an omelet? We have a small hobby farm. We grow lots of organic vegetables and have a small flock of chickens so our family eats many eggs and egg dishes. Part of my family wants the eggs to be completely mixed/emulsified (no white blotches) in their omelets. It doesn't phase me either way. Is there actually a difference? What is your preference? Please help settle this family debate. We are curious to know how you like your eggs blended? Please fill out the poll. It is fun for us to see the response!!!
 

PrincessFiona60

Ogress Supreme
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For omelets, I like them well beaten with no white showing. For scrambled eggs, just beaten a little.
 

Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
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Sep 1, 2004
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Massachusetts
I like mine well mixed. On the other hand, a traditional omelet calls for eggs to be lightly beaten.

As with breaking pasta, do what you want it's nothing more than a matter of personal preference.

You could tell your family if they don't like how you do it, they can do it themselves.
 

GLC

Head Chef
Joined
Oct 27, 2011
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Near Austin, Texas
I want to beat some air into the eggs for a fluffier omelet, bur not so much as for a frittata. For scrambled, I want the natural variations that come from not beating, just for a more interesting dish.

Also, since an omelet isn't properly in the pan for more than 30 seconds, I think it's appropriate to beat them into something that will all be done at the same time.

But thorough beating for omelets is just the standard. Since omelets are made one at a time, it's easy enough to please everyone.
 

PrincessFiona60

Ogress Supreme
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I beat the eggs long enough to get mix in the white and it runs off the whisk, fully liquid. Then I let it sit for 20 minutes to come to room temp. If I want a fluffy omelet, I use without letting it rest.

I use the same technique for french toast.
 

CharlieD

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 17, 2004
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USA,Minnesota
Not only do I like eggs bitten completely, if it was up to me I would not use white at all, I like yolk better. Also I like to bring the eggs to room temperature before cracking them open, or even warmer, run them under hot/warm water, then they beat and mix better and omelet comes out much fluffier.
 

PattY1

Washing Up
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Jul 12, 2008
Messages
2,325
I ordered scrambled eggs at a locally own restaurant once and the eggs were cracked on the grill whole, left to set partly then scrambled. YUCK!!!! That experience made sense of the remark I heard once by a elderly lady. She said "he beat up the eggs in a bowl first like they do in fancy restaurants". I grew up eating eggs that were thoroughly beaten before cooking. Any other way is totally unappetizing to me.
 

Kayelle

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south central coast/California
When my sons were still at home they used to break the eggs in the hot pan and mix them up just because they were too lazy to put them in a bowl and beat them properly.
Then they would squeeze catchup all over that yellow and white mess and call it good. :ohmy::sick:

I'm glad they have wives who have to deal with them now. :LOL:
 
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gadzooks

Sous Chef
Joined
Dec 10, 2007
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895
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SoCal
I use a whisk and a whisking bowl. Beat them until they're pretty well mixed, still a little "spotty.". The bowl I had was an old Norpro with a completely round bottom and a flared rim for a handle. When I found a set of three similar Cuisinart ss bowls with the flared rim handle, I gave away the old Norpro. The Cuis's have a small flat bottom that I don't quite like as much. I wonder if I can get the old bowl back...but when I do shelter breakfast, the eggs get scrambled in a 2 qt. ss water pitcher with an immersion blender. Every second seems to count. 2 dozen plain scrambled and a dozen more scrambled with chorizo. The stick is a 200 watt Braun and does three dozen eggs in about ten seconds.
 

taxlady

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near Montreal, Quebec
When I make scrambled eggs, I break the eggs into the pan, add milk & butter and then stir like crazy.

If I'm making what my mother called a "French omelette", I beat the eggs with a fork, but not so much that it's completely liquid. If I'm making something fluffier or breading something, I beat the eggs with a whisk until there is no stringiness left.
 

Barbara L

Traveling Welcome Wagon
Joined
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Somewhere, US
I like mine mixed in pretty well. I don't mind if it is a little spotty, but I don't want any glaringly big white lumps. :cool:
 

CWS4322

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Jan 2, 2011
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Rural Ottawa, Ontario
For French omelettes, I beat in a bowl with a fork to which I've added 1/2 egg shell of milk or cream for each egg. For scrambled, I melt the butter in a CI, break the eggs directly into the pan, and stir with a fork as the eggs cook. I don't add liquid to my scrambled eggs any more. Welcome to DC, I too have a small flock of hens (16) and an organic garden. Love those fresh eggs! How many hens and what kind are yours (mine are Rhode Island Reds (11), Plymouth Rocks (3), and Buff Orpingtons (2)...thinking of adding a couple of Polish hens, but haven't found those yet).
 

1006gm

Assistant Cook
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
20
Location
New Jersey
Thanks for your response. I have 18 hens now. Mix of Buffs, Morans, and Americanas. The Buff's are so friendly that my children walk around with them in their arms and if you kneel down they will try to get on your lap. We got those for the assortment of colors of the eggs. Dark brown, pinkish, blue/green tints. They are beautiful and delicious! I had Polish hens many years ago and loved them!!!! They are friendly and I love their looks! We have a local Agway (store) that sells chicks but you can try murray mcmurray hatchery. They have a wide variety plus the website is fun to look at. Lots of good pics of chicks, poultry and exotic fowl.
 

Sir_Loin_of_Beef

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Sandy Eggo
I ordered scrambled eggs at a locally own restaurant once and the eggs were cracked on the grill whole, left to set partly then scrambled. YUCK!!!! That experience made sense of the remark I heard once by a elderly lady. She said "he beat up the eggs in a bowl first like they do in fancy restaurants". I grew up eating eggs that were thoroughly beaten before cooking. Any other way is totally unappetizing to me.

Spare the rod and spoil the omelette!

That's how we did it in the Army. KP personnel would crack two eggs to a bowl and line the bowls up all the way to Tennessee if necessary (I was at Fort Knox, KY), then as you came down the chow line you were asked, "up or scrambled?" Thebowl of eggs were then dumped onto the griddle, and if you wanted them scrambled, the cook would mix them up with a spatula as they cooked. I do them the same way at home, only in my Calphalon non-stick Everyday pan rather than on a griddle.
 
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buckytom

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Joined
Aug 19, 2004
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My mountain
ok, i've got a weird one.

when my boy was about 5 years old, he wanted to invent his own recipe. since i was making him eggs, i let him decide how to make them.

he cracks 2 eggs, seperating the whites and yolks into 2 bowls. the yolks are just broken and mixed a little while the whites are whisked briskly, adding freshly cracked black pepper to the whites as they become a little fluffy.
the whites and yolks are sort of foldedded together and it is all oured in a hot buttered pan to cook. as soon as it mostly sets, it's flipped to finish the top side for just a few seconds.

the result is a strangely good, spotty white and yellow egg, somewhat between fried and scrambled.

he calls them his spotted eggs. :chef:
 

Steve Kroll

Wine Guy
Joined
Mar 29, 2011
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Twin Cities, Minnesota
When I make scrambled eggs, I break the eggs into the pan, add milk & butter and then stir like crazy.

If I'm making what my mother called a "French omelette", I beat the eggs with a fork, but not so much that it's completely liquid. If I'm making something fluffier or breading something, I beat the eggs with a whisk until there is no stringiness left.
This is more or less what I do.

In short, I'm not really that worried about yolks and whites being completely integrated, unless a recipe specifically calls for that.
 

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