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Old 04-25-2006, 12:25 PM   #51
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The chocolate will be in the baking section. It is labled as unsweetened chocolate or bakers chocolate. It has a very bitter taste if you eat it on it's own. It comes in a bar that is segmented into squares. I would start with one square, but would use as much as two depending on how much chili I was making.
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Old 04-25-2006, 12:43 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citizen Bob
Is this what you mean:

1 T. cascabel powder
1 T. ancho powder
1 T. chipotle powder
1 T. cumin powder
1 t. garlic powder
1 t. Mexican oregano

No onion powder, no paprika, no other ingredients..
Yes. But what i might suggest is that you reduce the chipotle to 1t to start. Mix all together and then taste and see what you think. Each of the ingredients has a very distinct taste -- let your own palate be the guide. If 1t of chipotle doesn't make the mixture hot/smokey enough, add more. Likewise with the other ingredients. If it isn't hot enough, add some cayenne or basic red pepper flakes.

If you like the taste of paprika, by all means use that too. Onion powder is ok, too, depending on how much fresh onion you are using. It's all about what you like. If you were asking about tarragon in your chili, I might try to talk you out of it, but paprika is fine.

You can always add more, but can't take away except by adding more of everything, so start with small amounts when you experiment.

If you like making your own spice mixes, i recommend buying your ingredients from penzey's or the Spice House or other places with impeccably fresh spices. Big difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Citizen Bob
If this is what you meant, how much of that powder mix do I use with 2 lb of meat?
Lordy, I may not be the right one to ask because I would use a lot of it. Again, this is all to taste. Start small (maybe 3-4T for 2 lbs of meat) and add in as needed to your taste. I usually use at least 3T of chili powder for every lb of meat. But that's me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Citizen Bob
Please specify the exact product and the exact amount so I can buy it at the grocery. My wife usually shops for sweets so I am not familiar with the products.
Like GB said, unsweetened baking chocolate. It comes in a box (8 oz, I think). Once again, start small by melting in maybe 1/2 of one of the blocks (would that be one ounce? I can't remember how many blocks come in a box). Then taste and see what you think. I have also used unsweetened cocoa powder.

When experimenting with a recipe, it's always best to add flavor in smaller, managebale amounts, then TASTE, then correct seasoning.
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Old 04-25-2006, 12:59 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
reduce the chipotle to 1t to start, use unsweetened baking chocolate.
OK, based on all your comments here's the recipe I will try tomorrow.

Basic Chili
---------
2 lb beef-pork mix (2:1)
2 medium onions diced
6 cloves garlic
4-6 T. chili powder
1 qt. crushed tomatoes
1 qt. diced tomatoes
1 qt. beef broth
1 square unsweetened chocolate
1 T. salt

Chili Powder
-----------
1 T. cascabel powder
1 T. ancho powder
1 t. chipotle powder
1 t. garlic powder
1 T. cumin powder
1 t. Mexican oregano
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Old 04-25-2006, 01:08 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
If you like making your own spice mixes, i recommend buying your ingredients from penzey's or the Spice House or other places with impeccably fresh spices.
Living in Houston means I can get all the fresh spices and ingredients I want in large quantity at a very cheap price. I am using fresh dried bulk chile peppers sold at local grocery stores by the box load. The cumin seeds come from an Indian restaurant supplier and are as fresh as anyone can get them. The Mexican oregano is made up by a large Mexican food supplier supplier in San Antonio. Everything I use is first quality.

Quote:
Big difference.
Indeed!

I could no more use pre-packaged chili powder than I could open a can of Wolf's <barf>
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Old 04-25-2006, 01:56 PM   #55
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Looks good to start!

Make sure you taste the chili powder so that it has the right balance -- add more chipotle, cumin, for example, if you think it needs it.

Taste the chili often as it cooks and the flavors bloom. I usually add more chili powder (or more cumin/garlic, etc by themselves) as it cooks to get it to the depth of flavor that I like. Also, it may need more salt, but add that later in the process, as needed.

The squares of chocolate should be scored so that they break in half. You might add 1/2 and then taste as it cooks -- if you like, then add the other half. It does not make your chili taste like a hershey bar, but gives it an earthiness like mole sauce.

You might want to drain the tomatoes unless you like a lot of liquid. You might also consider a mix of beer and beef broth. I like the way beer tastes in chili, but it's all up to you.
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Old 04-25-2006, 02:21 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
You might want to drain the tomatoes unless you like a lot of liquid.
I am using Sam's Club bulk tomato products which are not filled with water. In fact I have to add water in the form of beef broth to thin the mixture.

Quote:
You might also consider a mix of beer and beef broth. I like the way beer tastes in chili, but it's all up to you.
I have the beef broth in the recipe. As far as beer is concerned the only way I like it is out of a stein from my draft beer system.
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Old 04-26-2006, 11:23 AM   #57
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Based on discussions so far, the recipe is:

1 T. cascabel powder
1 T. ancho powder
1 t. chipotle powder
1 T. cumin powder
1 t. garlic powder
1 t. Mexican oregano

Now it's time for final adjustments to be made.

The Food TV recipe is below. I measured the weights and volumes after roasting and grinding.

3 cascabel - 9.0 gr - 2 T.
3 ancho - 21.6 gr - 4 T.
3 chipotle - 4.0 gr - 2 t.

In an attempt to compromise between the two recipes, I came up with this

1 T. cascabel powder
2 T. ancho powder
1 t. chipotle powder
1 T. cumin powder
1 t. garlic powder
1 t. Mexican oregano

The only difference is double the ancho, which I do not believe will hurt the overall flavor and may actually enhance it.
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Old 04-26-2006, 11:28 AM   #58
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Since most commercial chili powders usually use only ancho, it will likely have a familiar taste. But the fun in this is adjusting it to your own taste!
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Old 04-26-2006, 11:44 AM   #59
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I think chile/chili 'recipes' go down the same path as 'spaghetti sauce'. They're regional, depending on the chile amd other ingredients grown in the area, and whose grandmother is doing the cooking, lol! That's why you see so many variations in the types of chiles and spices in different recipes.

I would highly recommend you get some books by both Rick Bayless and Zarela Martinez, for a great education on chiles, chilis, moles, and other sauces.
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Old 04-26-2006, 11:49 AM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
I would highly recommend you get some books by both Rick Bayless and Zarela Martinez, for a great education on chiles, chilis, moles, and other sauces.

Or Diana Kennedy!
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