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Old 04-27-2006, 12:29 PM   #71
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This recipe was created in collaboration with the experts on this forum. It is the best chili I have ever made.

Citizen Bob's Chili
----------------
2 lb beef-pork mix (2:1)
2 medium onions diced
6 cloves garlic
6 T. Citizen Bob's Chili Powder (see below)
1/2 lg. can crushed tomatoes
1/2 lg. can diced tomatoes
1 qt. beef broth
1 square unsweetened chocolate
1 T. kosher salt

This makes about 6 qts. so you will need a large crock pot. Cook on high for 4 hours after it gets hot (usually 2 more hours) or cook for 6-8 hours on low (after it gets hot). I like to cook on high for at least 2 hours (after it gets hot) and then on low for 4 more hours, or when it tastes done. Don't dry it out too much - you want it to be slightly watery like a thick soup.

Mix 4 lb ground chuck with 2 lb ground pork shoulder (available freshly ground at a Chinese market) and make up into 2 lb bags for the freezer. Brown meat then add onions and cook until onions are translucent. Do not overcook onions or they will turn into mush in the crock pot.

You can use a mix of crushed and diced tomatoes or use only crushed in double amount. I use canned tomatoes from Sam's Club because they are very cheap (large can, 102 wt. oz, $2.18).

I also put 7 oz. of angel hair (half a package) in to make Chili Mac. I grew up in the Midwest where that was the tradition. I used to put beans in chili, but no more because it changes the taste too much. Texas Red is chili without beans.

Citizen Bob's Chili Powder
------------------------
2 T. cascabel powder
4 T. ancho powder
2 t. chipotle powder
2 T. cumin powder
1 T. garlic powder
1 T. Mexican oregano

Roast 3 of each chile to get the volumes indicated above. Preheat oven to 300°F. Remove stems and seeds from all the chiles. Cut each chile in half with scissors and flatten the pieces. Put the chiles in a single layer on a baking sheet and roast for about 10 minutes until they crack like potato chips. Toast the cumin seeds for 5 minutes in a 300F oven. Grind chiles and cumin seeds separately in a coffee mill, then blend according to the recipe above.
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Old 04-27-2006, 12:30 PM   #72
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Great job Bob!!!
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Old 04-27-2006, 12:58 PM   #73
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I am really glad it came out well. Looks like you got the seasoning just right for your taste!
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Old 04-27-2006, 04:51 PM   #74
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great thread, everyone. Perfect example of how fine and useful this site is.
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Old 04-27-2006, 07:50 PM   #75
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Great1 Glad it turned out the way you like it! And now - just to give you a little more food for thought - here's a chili recipe based on ingredients in a traditional mole, that won a prize in a NYC chili contest!

First,

RED CHILE PUREE
3oz.mixed dried chiles (I use ancho, guajillo, and pasilla)
1 cup orange juice
1 bottle dark beer
1T pumpkin seeds
1tsp. cumin seeds
1T sliced almonds
tsp. Chinese 5spice powder
pinch allspice
pinch cinnamon
1T Sherry vinegar
3 cloves garlic minced
1 shallot minced
salt and pepper to taste

Steep chiles in orange juice and beer til softened, about 20 minutes. Toast seeds and spices til aromatic. Blend chiles in batches with other ingredients; you may need to add water in order for it to liquify. Taste for salt; BE CAREFUL; THIS STUFF IS EXTREMELY TOXIC! Makes about a quart; can be frozen in small batches.

Use for base for Buffalo chili, or other chilis, or enchilada sauce.

Then..........................to make the chili,

BUFFALO CHILI
2lbs. cubed Buffalo or beef
1pt. Red Chili puree*
1 large white onion
4 cloves garlic minced
1cup canned whole tomatoes
2tsp. dry oregano
1tsp. rosemary
1tsp. tarragon
cup espresso
1T creamy peanut butter
1T cocoa powder
1 corn tortilla
salt and pepper to taste

Place cubed meat in red chili puree and marinate overnight. Saute onions and garlic until soft. Remove meat from marinade, add to pan and saute til browned. Add remainder of puree to pan; crush tomatoes by hand directly into pan. Add herbs. Bring to a simmer, cover and place in a 325 oven; stir every hour to prevent browning on bottom of pan. Remove from oven in approximately 2 hours, or when meat is very tender. Put chili back on stove, add peanut butter, cocoa powder, espresso and stir gently. Tear tortilla into small pieces and add to chili stirring gently; the tortilla will dissolve and thicken the chili. Season w/salt and pepper.


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Old 04-27-2006, 10:34 PM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmalady
Great1 Glad it turned out the way you like it! And now - just to give you a little more food for thought - here's a chili recipe based on ingredients in a traditional mole, that won a prize in a NYC chili contest!
Wow - that is some recipe. It must take all day to make it.

Quote:
3oz.mixed dried chiles (I use ancho, guajillo, and pasilla)

I assume that is 3 weight ounces (wt. oz.) But what proportion are the 3 chiles?

I used the following:

-----------------Weight Volume
3 cascabel chiles - 9.0 g. - 2 T.
3 ancho chiles -- 21.6 g. - 4 T.
3 chipotle chiles - 4.0 g. - 2 t.
---------Total - 34.6 g. - 6 2/3 T.

which is a bit over 1 wt. oz. (Weights and Volumes are after roasting).

I chose 3 typical chiles of each variety. I added 4 T. of additional spices for a grand total of 10 2/3 T. Then I used 6 T. of that powder in the chili, which works out to about 2 chiles each. The heat is moderate - it's definitely there but not overpowering - like about 1/2 t. of cayene.

Quote:
1 corn tortilla
Tear tortilla into small pieces and add to chili stirring gently; the tortilla will dissolve and thicken the chili.

I will have to remember this so I can thicken my chili just a bit. I don't like to boil away the liquid too much or it tastes too strong.
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Old 04-28-2006, 05:37 AM   #77
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I'm afraid I don't get nearly that compulsive about how much of each chile - but it probably worked out to be 2/3 ancho, and 1/3 a mix of the others. Note that the chiles aren't dried and ground up, but steeped whole and then made into the puree in that state.

If you make up the puree in advance, the actual chili itself isn't difficult to put together.
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Old 04-28-2006, 07:36 AM   #78
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Quote:
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I'm afraid I don't get nearly that compulsive about how much of each chile
I am a physicist by profession (retired) so I naturally take measurements, especially when I am working up a new recipe. Part of the fun of a new recipe is in the quantification of the ingredients. It gives me a baseline from which to work.

Also, it is easier to communicate with others when the quantities are specified. For example, one person on this forum recommended I cut back from 1 T. of chipotle to 1 t., which turned out to be very helpful in terms of the heat. If I had used the original 1 T. the result would have been far too hot for my tastes.

My wife likes to eyeball recipes sometimes and the result is wide variation in taste from batch to batch. I always measure recipes, even those I have been using for years, so if I decide to vary the recipe I will know how to duplicate it.

As Pythagoras said, "Everything is numbers."
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Old 04-28-2006, 07:52 AM   #79
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Bob I can completely understand why you measure everything and you are right that it helps when passing recipes to others. It can be hard to share a recipe when the amounts are just guessed at.

That being said, measuring in cooking and measuring in the lab are two totally different animals. The reason I say this is simple. Lets take the 1 T of chipotle to 1 t of chipotle example. The next time you make this recipe the chpotles you get could very well have a different amount of heat than your last batch. While this time 1 T would have been too hot, next time might be a different story.

It is often said that cooking is an art while baking is a science.

I am not saying your way is wrong. Far from it. I think you have found what works and is enjoyable for you and that is what cooking is all about. Way to go!
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Old 04-28-2006, 09:19 AM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Bob I can completely understand why you measure everything and you are right that it helps when passing recipes to others. It can be hard to share a recipe when the amounts are just guessed at.

That being said, measuring in cooking and measuring in the lab are two totally different animals. The reason I say this is simple. Lets take the 1 T of chipotle to 1 t of chipotle example. The next time you make this recipe the chpotles you get could very well have a different amount of heat than your last batch. While this time 1 T would have been too hot, next time might be a different story.

It is often said that cooking is an art while baking is a science.

I am not saying your way is wrong. Far from it. I think you have found what works and is enjoyable for you and that is what cooking is all about. Way to go!
This is one of those existential questions: "To measure or not to measure". While I am prone to measure, I certainly am not obsessed with doing it all the time. Many times I will season to taste to make up for variations in products.

However, there is a good case to be made for cooks who have a written recipe to refer to in case they have forgotten something. This is especially true of recipes that are sensitive to slight variations in ingredients.

We have collected over two reams of paper which contain recipes we like - that's 1,000 recipes. There is no way I can possibly keep track of all those recipes by memory alone. So I have no choice but to quantify the ingredients for future reference.
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