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Old 01-13-2021, 06:12 AM   #21
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When I was a lot younger, for lunch (just about every day) I would go to a local take out Chinese place that had a clear view of the kitchen area. I would order a stir fry and noodle dish alternating days fo about 1 year. This is when I was starting to get really into cooking, so I paid very close attention to what they were doing in the back. One thing I noticed with the veggies were that they were free blanching them prior to stir frying. They had a huge wok with either water or broth ( not sure), but they would put the veggies for the dish in a mesh like strainer, dip them into the liquid food a brief amount of time, then they had a way of hanging/ positioning the blanched veggies over the wok so the veggies would strain, and the liquid would drip back into the wok. As the veggies were draining, they would use a second wok to quickly stir fry the aromatic veggies ( ginger, onion, garlic). They would then toss the blanched veggies in the last second for a few flips in the wok with the other ingredients, add a few different liquid sauces ( soy sauce, oyster sauce .....), probably a few sprinkles of MSG and then a thickening agent ( starch mixed with liquid) to finish things up. If the whole thing took longer than 5 - 10 minutes, thats a lot. Being a take out place, everything was already prepared and ready to go prior to cooking. They had 2 different sized bowls ( one for a small order the other for a large , depending on what the order was. They would go down the line of pre cut veggies, and fill up the bowls. The sized bowls also corresponded to the size of the white take out boxes so they were assured too fill them up ( but not over fill). They had it down to a science.

The pre blanching gives the other veggies a head start, this way they spend less time in the wok. Pre blanching is quick, not something where you want the veggies to get mushy or soggy. As far as the onions, garlic and ginger go, they are quick too. Burnt garlic will ruin a dish, and most Chinese dishes with onions that I have, the onions have minimal to no color and still have some consistency ( a slight crunch) but missing the intense raw onion flavor. ( there are exceptions in certain dishes where the onions are cooked with a little more color).
With green onions/ scallions, many times the harder white part are cooked in he beginning, where as the green part are tossed in at the end, as they are very tender and cook extremely quick , and also give a little bit More of that raw onion flavor, in a toned down kinda way.
Also, its almost impossible to get the same heat at home than those rocket engine woks they have at the restaurant. And I think it is that which is letting me get close to, but not exactly like it is in the restaurant . Just cant generate enough heat to allow me to stir fry like he pros.
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Old 01-13-2021, 06:55 AM   #22
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Excellent post, Larry.

Ross
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Old 01-13-2021, 07:59 AM   #23
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excellent post, larry.

Ross

ditto!!
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Old 01-13-2021, 12:34 PM   #24
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"Also, its almost impossible to get the same heat at home than those rocket engine woks they have at the restaurant. And I think it is that which is letting me get close to, but not exactly like it is in the restaurant . Just cant generate enough heat to allow me to stir fry like he pros."

Kenji López-Alt has a cooking show on YouTube and has been testing outdoor gas-powered wok burners. Thought you might like to watch this video.
https://youtu.be/cpoSvprBJpE
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Old 01-13-2021, 12:53 PM   #25
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I think I got it now!

One mistake that I did:
I poured the wine while the oil was extremely hot and almost blow the house!

I wanted the wine to vaporize before I add the veggies.

Why I used wine? I live in the countryside and It's difficult to find soya sauce.

Though my mother told me Wine only goes with meat, but I didn't listen.

This is how I did it:
1) I cooked the eggs in a similar way you make scrambled eggs.
2) I preheated the oil, then poured the wine (let it vaporize), and then when the pan became extremely hot again, I added all the veggies, lift it in the air (away from the heating source), and started stirring.
3) I added the rice, put the pan in the heat again, did a little bit of stirring, and served with the eggs on top.

Ingredients:
3 eggs.
Boiled rice.
1 Carrot, peeled.
1/2 dry onion.
1/2 Green pepper.
salt.
black pepper powder.
red pepper powder.
1 tablespoon wine.
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Old 01-13-2021, 03:18 PM   #26
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Can you get Worcestershire sauce or Maggi Sauce? Those would be better substitutes for soy sauce than wine. I wouldn't use wine to try to substitute for soy sauce. I would rather skip it.
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Old 01-13-2021, 03:31 PM   #27
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Can you get Worcestershire sauce or Maggi Sauce? Those would be better substitutes for soy sauce than wine. I wouldn't use wine to try to substitute for soy sauce. I would rather skip it.
I don't even know what they are or if I can find them at Greece. I can buy balsamic vinegar though.
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Old 01-13-2021, 04:06 PM   #28
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I don't even know what they are or if I can find them at Greece. I can buy balsamic vinegar though.
It's difficult to make a specific cuisine when you can't get the ingredients that create the flavors that are essential to it.
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Old 01-13-2021, 05:54 PM   #29
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To sub for soy sauce, use a small amount of poison (fish sauce) sauce, or a little anchovy paste. You could also use dried shrimp, dried, powdered mushrooms, nori (dried seaweed leaves), or tamari. All work it into the food, then taste it. Add more if required.of these have a flavor called umami, which is similar to, and enhances the flavor of other foods. All of these are used as seasoning, so you add a little, Certain proteins, such as livers, heart, and pork products such as bacon. porchetta, chorizo, braunshweiger, and crispy-fried chicken skins will also add flavor and depth to a stir fry. Just be sure tp mince them before adding to the dish, as they are used as seasonings.

Another flavor-bomb for stir fries is sugar snap peas, or snow peas. Jerusalem artichoke (sunchokes) are great as well. I love water chestnuts, and bamboo shoots in my stir-fry dishes.If you can find them, toasted sesame oil, hoisin sauce and plumb sauce are great in stir fries.

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Old 01-13-2021, 10:30 PM   #30
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I don't even know what they are or if I can find them at Greece. I can buy balsamic vinegar though.
Maybe your mother or your chef friend would know where to get them. Is there a health food store? If there is, they probably carry tamari, a type of Japanese soy sauce.
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