"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-26-2012, 09:21 AM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 863
Splashing out, virtually at least.

If you had 100 Euros extra right now, to buy cooking ingredients, what would they be?

Mel! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2012, 01:25 PM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 545
Really fancy vanilla beans or saffron but I wouldn't be stingy with it like usual. A whole large bean in my creme brule and lots of saffron in my rice!
Siegal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2012, 01:27 PM   #3
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 38,941
I would stock up on finishing salts and gourmet pepper.
__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2012, 01:36 PM   #4
Traveling Welcome Wagon
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere, US
Posts: 15,716
I don't know how much 100 Euros would buy, but I would buy as many avocados and other guacamole ingredients as I could, along with an equal amount of nacho cheese, jalapenos, and white corn tortilla chips! Since it is strictly virtual, I won't have to worry about my blood pressure and blood glucose levels! (Although I think they just both went up when I wrote the ingredients down!).
Barbara L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2012, 01:40 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 13,466
Fresh Truffles from France or Italy.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
https://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2012, 02:19 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,457
Don't think $133.00 dollars would buy an aweful lot of stuff. Maybe 1/4 of a golf ball size white truffle. Maybe a small jar of beluga caviar?
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2012, 02:59 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,456
Lobster, lots, butter and expensive cheeses.
__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2012, 03:59 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,623
A nice piece of beef!
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2012, 04:43 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 25,046
I'd go for the beluga caviar!
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 10:32 AM   #10
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 863
I think, I would go with the stocking up on vanilla and saffron too. :)

Also, I would go to the Asian store and buy some of all the spices I am missing. I generally collect them, one at a time, and have always run out of some of them.
Mel! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 10:50 AM   #11
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Both in Italy and Spain
Posts: 3,425
Jabugo air dried acorn fed ham from Jabugo, Huelva Spain and Proscuitto di Parma from Parma, Emilia Romagna, Italia ...

If there was a drop left over, I would get a bottle of red wine that I like called DOSMAUROs ( Sán Román, Zamora, Spain ) from a winery by same name.

NOTE: $1.33 USD is 1.00 Euro

Otherwise I would do this: get 2 Filet Mignon and Lobster for two ...
and 2 bottles of wine, a white and a red ... This would certainly be in price range of 133 Euros ... with change left over ...

Interesting post. Thanks, and Kind regards.
Margi.
Margi.
Margi Cintrano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 04:28 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Whiskadoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Twin Cities Mn
Posts: 4,039
The grocer's wanted $13 US yesterday for a pineapple they peeled and put in a plasic tub in long sticks. Here - we already did all the work for you, now pay us. I couldn't find a decent / ripe pina at this market, so I passed on it this time ( which is also why I was looking at the packaged ones).

I didn't blink twice when buying some fresh herbs @ $ 2.99 hot house / off season/ same price any herb. Basically worth about 25-50 cents any other time of year.

I have been lucky enough to have wonderful prime steaks several times in my life. I could make similar meals again, but never repeat Those Same Steaks, ( please read= steaks = Any perfect meal you've ever had) Nor The Occasions when they occurred.

I have never tasted caviar, so I guess this would make my list, along with a whole lobster cooked for two on the beach along the coast in Maine, with a nice wine and a bonfire after dark. Did I go over Budget?

Probably.
Whiskadoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 05:23 PM   #13
Executive Chef
 
Whiskadoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Twin Cities Mn
Posts: 4,039
"Jabugo air dried acorn fed ham from Jabugo, Huelva Spain and Proscuitto di Parma from Parma, Emilia Romagna, Italia ... "

Margi, do you know it's only within recent years we in the US have been able to import /buy these hams. The US dept of agriculure or some gov't body had a restriction on imports like these so as not to compete with local produced hams. I think these regulations have changed long enough now, that I don't remember. I have yet to see Iberian hams made from acorn fed pigs in a market though. I suspect one woujld need to place a Very Special Order and hope that no one koshed you on the head while unobtusively leaving the market with your purchase in a very plain un-marked wrapper tucked inside a generic grocery bag. LOL

Some things are costly because they are rare, and some things are costly because of the quality from their begining growth cylce. until the many months it takes for them to cure long after the ham has been made. I think Iberian hams fall within both categories.

PS. My grandfather was a Meat - packer? I think that's what they call this job. His job with a reputable company was to make smoked hams which were hoisted to the rafters of a big building that I remember as a kid, to hang for months. The Hams that is. I wasn't strung up. (Although I wasn't a model grandchild) . I think his hams tasted good. That was years ago. Now, their hams are mostly injected and are turned out to the grocer's shelf in lightning speed.

That is different kinds of ham. Hamm. I think is good in its many forms. Right up there with Bacon. Mmmm bacon. The other best part of Pigs.

PPS. How far we have come. Around. Our local city now allows Chickens to be grown in your back yard for personal use. And the City Council last year revised laws for commercial gardens. I wonder how soon we will be able to grow our own back yard pigs, beyond Pot Belly Pets.

Mmmm Pork.
Whiskadoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 06:56 PM   #14
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiskadoodle View Post
"Jabugo air dried acorn fed ham from Jabugo, Huelva Spain and Proscuitto di Parma from Parma, Emilia Romagna, Italia ... "

Margi, do you know it's only within recent years we in the US have been able to import /buy these hams. The US dept of agriculure or some gov't body had a restriction on imports like these so as not to compete with local produced hams. I think these regulations have changed long enough now, that I don't remember. I have yet to see Iberian hams made from acorn fed pigs in a market though. I suspect one woujld need to place a Very Special Order and hope that no one koshed you on the head while unobtusively leaving the market with your purchase in a very plain un-marked wrapper tucked inside a generic grocery bag. LOL

Some things are costly because they are rare, and some things are costly because of the quality from their begining growth cylce. until the many months it takes for them to cure long after the ham has been made. I think Iberian hams fall within both categories.

PS. My grandfather was a Meat - packer? I think that's what they call this job. His job with a reputable company was to make smoked hams which were hoisted to the rafters of a big building that I remember as a kid, to hang for months. The Hams that is. I wasn't strung up. (Although I wasn't a model grandchild) . I think his hams tasted good. That was years ago. Now, their hams are mostly injected and are turned out to the grocer's shelf in lightning speed.

That is different kinds of ham. Hamm. I think is good in its many forms. Right up there with Bacon. Mmmm bacon. The other best part of Pigs.

PPS. How far we have come. Around. Our local city now allows Chickens to be grown in your back yard for personal use. And the City Council last year revised laws for commercial gardens. I wonder how soon we will be able to grow our own back yard pigs, beyond Pot Belly Pets.

Mmmm Pork.
There are still restrictions on these products. The cure time is dictated by the USDA. We can't get the exact product available in the country of origin! Those folks must laugh long and heartily at the USDA, since they have been doing these products well before we were a country!
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.