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Old 12-24-2005, 03:46 PM   #1
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Need help with giblet gravy

I think that this has been talked about, but, I can't find it.
DH is frying his turkey, therefore, no drippings.
How am I going to make my giblet gravy? Can the giblet be cooked a way to produce some kind of drippings?
We usually use the drippings and a little chicken broth instead of milk as I do in white or sausage gravy. I'm going the whole nine yards, except for dessert I forgot that part DH be sending me to the store later

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Old 12-24-2005, 04:45 PM   #2
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You could saute the giblets first to get some pan drippings I think. Should get you a bit of fond that way. I usually get extra giblets because we love gravy around here. Or you could buy an extra wing and saute that.

Hope this helps. Good luck!
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Old 12-24-2005, 04:54 PM   #3
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Thanks for your help!!
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Old 12-24-2005, 05:32 PM   #4
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we did this last year...and boiled the giblets in water (seasoned) for about 40 mins...then sauted in butter for about 15 mins.

good luck!! deep fried turkey is awesome!!!
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Old 12-24-2005, 05:41 PM   #5
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What would it taste like if I just boil the giblets in a little water and used the water as broth for the gravy? Would that be enough to season the gravy if I use just a little peanut oil for the base?
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Old 12-24-2005, 06:49 PM   #6
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you can send me some turkey to taste test for you! numm........
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Old 12-24-2005, 07:08 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bugs
you can send me some turkey to taste test for you! numm........
It's on the way Bugs!! Merry Christmas!
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Old 12-25-2005, 12:20 AM   #8
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If I had been on sooner, I would have suggested simmering the neck and giblets in chicken broth with onion, celery, parsley, etc. to get something to make gravy with.
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Old 12-25-2005, 12:36 AM   #9
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Old 12-25-2005, 01:34 AM   #10
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Sorry it is so late but just saw your post.

We will buy extra giblets, a wing, a couple of chicken legs, some fowl of some kind, and either saute or roast with some carrot, onion, and celery and make a quick stock. Then add a roux and you have some gravy.

You can always cheat, we do, and saute up any turkey or chicken bits you have, not the liver, add chicken storck, strain, boil it down a bit and add a roux.

Have a turkey frier but have never used it.

Right now it is too cold here and we have a standing rib roast ready to go.

But one of these days, when I screw up my courage, I will try it.

Enjoy.
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Old 12-25-2005, 08:47 AM   #11
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Thanks everyone!! I really appreciate it!!
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Old 12-25-2005, 10:03 AM   #12
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If you need more gravy than what you have drippings for, you can always add a bit of cream of chicken soup to get the amount you need. Some people use that as the base of their gravy and add to it.
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Old 12-25-2005, 10:06 AM   #13
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Thanks licia, good idea!!
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Old 12-26-2005, 12:59 PM   #14
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I make gravy every year with the giblets and neck. My wife likes her turkey gravy thickened with cornstarch, while my oldest sister insists that flour is the better thinkener. So I use the pan drippings to make the flour-thickened gravy, and the turkey broth to make the cornstarched-thickened gravy.

To make a foolproof, well flavored broth, just heat a three-quart suacepan with 2 tbs. sunflower oil. Add the neck and giblets. Lightly brown. add 1/2 onion (sliced), 1 stalk of celery, sliced, and a quart of water to the pan. Bring to a boil. Turn down the heat, cover, and simmer for about 45 minutes to leach as much flavor from the neck and giblets as possible. Strain the broth through a fine wire mesh strainer and set the neck and giblets aside to cool. Return the broth to the stove and boil until the liquid is reduced by half. While it's boiling, finely chop the giblets and peel the meat from the neck. Add to the broth.

Finally, season with salt and pepper, a little at a time, and maybe some granulated garlic, again, a little at a time, until it tastes right to you. Thicken with a roux, or with a cornstarch slurry as you prefer.

This is not as time consuming as you would think, as you do other things while the broth is cooking. And It makes a truly deliscious turkey gravy. It has even move flavor than the brown-bits from the pan, and is way less greasy.

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Old 12-26-2005, 03:31 PM   #15
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Thanks Goodweed, I have copied and saved all of the suggestions here for future help.
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