"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Sauces, Marinades, Rubs
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-16-2018, 01:20 PM   #21
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: New Hampshire Seacoast
Posts: 2,510
Quote:
Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
I was just sharing some insight on how a lot of traditional Italian cooking evolved into Italian-American cooking. Many of the changes came from early Italian immigrants who found themselves in a country where they found it necessary to adapt their cooking to what was available (and cheap) here.
I recently picked up "Tasting Italy", the new book from National Geographic and America's Test Kitchen. Haven't read it yet, but thumbed through it. They point out that southern Italy has always been the poorest part of Italy, leading to more emigration than the north, so most Americans think of southern recipes when they think of Italian food.

If you are interested in reading about how Americans have modified some other countries cuisines, I would suggest reading "Ten Restaurants That Changed America" by Paul Freedman. It's an entertaining read, and will give you some insight into food history in the US. I'm pretty sure that's where I read where Texans turned wienerschnitzel into chicken fried steak!
tenspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2018, 02:23 PM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,368
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
I recently picked up "Tasting Italy", the new book from National Geographic and America's Test Kitchen. Haven't read it yet, but thumbed through it. They point out that southern Italy has always been the poorest part of Italy, leading to more emigration than the north, so most Americans think of southern recipes when they think of Italian food.

If you are interested in reading about how Americans have modified some other countries cuisines, I would suggest reading "Ten Restaurants That Changed America" by Paul Freedman. It's an entertaining read, and will give you some insight into food history in the US. I'm pretty sure that's where I read where Texans turned wienerschnitzel into chicken fried steak!
Yes, and interestingly, most German immigrants came from southern Germany - Bavaria. We've hosted three German exchange students - one from Berlin, one from Hamburg in the north and one from a city in the former East Germany. None of them had ever had German potato salad as we know it - because it was a Bavarian dish.

When I visited Austin, Texas, I learned that in the 1830s, a particular German acquired a large land grant and wrote to Germans back home telling them about the land available to purchase with low taxes. Of course, this appealed to people who at the time were mostly peasants working for the nobility. Later, some German nobles tried to establish a sort of mini-colony in the Texas colony and brought over thousands more peasants. That didn't last long, though.

I love food history. I'll look for that book - thanks for the recommendation.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2018, 03:44 PM   #23
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: New Hampshire Seacoast
Posts: 2,510
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I love food history. I'll look for that book - thanks for the recommendation.
You would probably enjoy "Why We Eat What We Eat" by Raymond Sokolov. I read it about 20 years ago, and should probably read it again (I still have it). You can pick up a used copy on Amazon for $6.
tenspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2018, 03:54 PM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,368
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
You would probably enjoy "Why We Eat What We Eat" by Raymond Sokolov. I read it about 20 years ago, and should probably read it again (I still have it). You can pick up a used copy on Amazon for $6.
Thanks ☺
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2018, 07:35 PM   #25
Master Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 5,661
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Yes, and interestingly, most German immigrants came from southern Germany - Bavaria. We've hosted three German exchange students - one from Berlin, one from Hamburg in the north and one from a city in the former East Germany. None of them had ever had German potato salad as we know it - because it was a Bavarian dish.

When I visited Austin, Texas, I learned that in the 1830s, a particular German acquired a large land grant and wrote to Germans back home telling them about the land available to purchase with low taxes. Of course, this appealed to people who at the time were mostly peasants working for the nobility. Later, some German nobles tried to establish a sort of mini-colony in the Texas colony and brought over thousands more peasants. That didn't last long, though.

I love food history. I'll look for that book - thanks for the recommendation.
Yes, Central Texas/Hill Country is VERY German. It was German Immigrants who also created Texas BBQ -- which is beef centric, because that was the most available meat.

As for Italian immigrants, my family came from the industrial North, near Torino.

CD
__________________
“People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” Winnie-the-Pooh
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
stew

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.