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Old 01-11-2004, 11:00 PM   #1
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ISO Scandinavian recipes

does anyone have any swedish/norwegian recipes they would like to share? nothing too exotic i.e. reindeer--yikes!! just some simple staple recipes. thanks!

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Old 01-12-2004, 07:40 AM   #2
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2dogsmom;
How about lutefisk (sp?)?
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Old 01-12-2004, 03:24 PM   #3
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bubbagourmet--
gross! and yes that is the correct spelling by the way.
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Old 01-13-2004, 07:07 AM   #4
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LOL I know...if you took a good piece of fish...dipped it into industrial chemical waste and let it sit in the NC summer sun for about 4 hours...it would still taste better than lutefisk. How can ANYONE eat that stuff?
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Old 01-13-2004, 07:24 AM   #5
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lol!
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Old 01-13-2004, 08:30 AM   #6
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what exactly is lutefisk?
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Old 01-13-2004, 11:45 AM   #7
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cod soaked in lye. yes--lye. sounds delicious, right?
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Old 01-14-2004, 06:49 AM   #8
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And in addition to the wonderful (gulp) flavor that the lye imparts to the fish, leave us not forget that aroma! Sorta puts one in mind of a pirates locker room on a hot August day! And that texture!
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Old 01-14-2004, 09:43 AM   #9
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so, bubbagourmet i take it you have tried this delicacy?
boy, they sure eat some crazy things over there. my father, who is half norwegian, used to eat these tiny, gross looking fish packed in oil that came in a tin (not sardines, but similar) but first he would chase my sister and i around the house with them and we would scream and scream. he got an absolute kick out of that!
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Old 01-15-2004, 06:34 AM   #10
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2dogsmom;
I long ago made it a personal philosophy to try anything. This has led to some phenomenal food discoveries...but also to some really nasty stuff. Believe it or not, lutefisk isn't the worst stuff out there!
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Old 09-19-2005, 10:12 PM   #11
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I have bought my herrings to make the great salad we used to make. I haven't found the cookbook yet though so can't even remember what is in it except that we liked it. Herrings seem available everywhere so are a good thing to menu plan with here. We have trouble with availability sometimes.

Any other herring salads?
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Old 09-20-2005, 08:42 AM   #12
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peel and slice thinly a cucumber, lightly salt it, and let it sit for awhile, drain liquid and pat dry. add sour cream, black pepper and dill (fresh or dried) to taste, mix gently. A favorite taste of Sweden on dark bread with smoked fish or salted meat. (find some canned herring or salted dried ham for example)

very simple ... and so Scandahoovian
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Old 09-20-2005, 08:44 AM   #13
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don't rag on lye processed foods or you can give up pretzels, corn flakes, hominy, grits, and half a dozen other common food items of the grains and cerial category. And I'm sure there are lots more.
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Old 10-10-2005, 08:29 AM   #14
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I love to watch Rick Steves a World traveler on PBS. He was in one of the Scandinavian countries. His guide or hostess took him to a sidewalk stand where they were dressing raw fish, small, about four to six inches long. People were devouring them raw, with great relish. They simply tipped back their heads and swallowed them whole, as we Americans did during the goldfish era. I can't remember what they were, but UGH. I didn't do goldfish either.

I visualize all those little parasites in the raw fish and it is a big turn-off. Same with sashimi. I like the veggie ones tho.
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Old 03-25-2008, 02:26 PM   #15
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Krubb Kaker (don't know if I have the spelling right) was one of my favorites, growing up. It is a sort of meat and potato dumpling. Peel and grate potatoes using the jagged side of the grater that turns things to mush (and takes the tops of your knuckles off - ouch!). By the time you are done grating several potatoes, the juice will have turned a brownish color. That's okay, don't drain it off. Add enough flour to make a dough that you can handle without it being too sticky. Squeeze off small balls of dough, flatten, and wrap around a piece of meat - we used to use a half of a breakfast-style pork link sausage (this works well if the sausage is still a bit frozen, too) - and seal it shut. Put dumplings in a big pot of water and boil a few minutes until done. If you have extra sausage, just throw them in the pot, as well. When sausage is cooked through, the dumplings are done. Scoop them out of the water with a slotted spoon and serve with butter and cream. Slice dumpling open, put a dab of butter inside and pour cream over. Delicious!

I also have a delicious Swedish pancake recipe and what about the traditional smorjabord?
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Old 03-25-2008, 05:55 PM   #16
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Norwegian Salmon Soup - a chowder to us.
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Posted By David Cottrell
Norwegian Salmon Soup - a chowder to us.

Most Excellent Norwegian Salmon Soup (Laksesuppe)

Recipe is from a first generation Norwegian-American, found at the International Festival in Columbus, Ohio, November 3 & 4, 2007. I had a cup both...

Here is one I posted - really good but all the more sophisticated cooks may find it old hat - I don't know. Made it for family, loved it so it's probably time to make it again.
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Old 03-25-2008, 07:32 PM   #17
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links:

Here are some links (if I can make this work)

New Scandinavian Cooking - Claus's Recipes

Sons of Norway - Norwegian Culture - Recipe Box
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Old 03-26-2008, 05:06 AM   #18
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I have a rally fab gravalax recipe in my homepage. I lived in Norway for 7 years and this was a recipe from a chef in Stavanger. Hope this helps! Fioan
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Old 03-26-2008, 07:22 AM   #19
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I was trying to remember foods from my childhood. I well remember lutefisk. I abhorred it. One thing I enjoyed was osta kaka a Swedish dessert. The kind we ate was sort of a custard/cheesecake. Sometimes it's topped with lignonberries.

I can't recommend a recipe. I've never made it. I just googled "osta kaka" and got a couple of hits. Hope this helps.
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Old 03-26-2008, 07:42 AM   #20
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Would Roll Mops be one?
I dont have a receipe. Maybe Google can find one.

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