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Old 03-28-2005, 11:49 AM   #1
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Post Dutch Oven Breakfast

Dutch Oven Breakfast

Ingredients:

1 package shredded hashbrowns (if using boxed, hydrate with water and drain)

Sausage (bulk, fried and crumbled) or Chopped ham or Crumbled fried bacon

One small onion chopped (or 1 tablespoon. dried onion)

One garlic clove (or garlic powder or salt)

1 8 oz package grated cheese (your favorite)

6 Eggs beaten well

Wipe dutch oven with oil. Put hashbrowns on bottom. Place meat choice on top of hashbrowns. Mix onion and garlic with eggs. Pour over hashbrown and meat mixture. Top with cheese and bake around 30 minutes.

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Old 04-23-2005, 08:26 PM   #2
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Rainee, what temp should the dutch oven be?

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Old 04-23-2005, 09:40 PM   #3
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About 350°
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Old 06-01-2006, 11:17 PM   #4
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This makes a great filling for breakfast burritos--put spoonfuls inside warmed flour tortillas, fold in the ends and roll up. Serve with salsa and you have great sausage, egg, and cheese breakfast burritos.
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Old 06-02-2006, 09:00 AM   #5
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Raine ~ Thanks for the recipe. A friend of mine calls this "Church Potatoes" because it is perfect to take to church potlucks. She says it is always a popular dish. I will definitely give it a try. And thanks to you, outdoorcook, for the suggestion to use it in burritos. Sounds great and will be perfect for Sunday brunch!!
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Old 06-02-2006, 09:29 AM   #6
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This sounds a lot like what is commonly referred to as Mountain Man Breakfast. It's a great recipe and very versatile.
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Old 06-13-2006, 09:52 AM   #7
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Fed this to family and guests last week. They loved it. Also added a couple of shots of hot sauce.
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Old 07-28-2006, 07:55 PM   #8
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Can I as as a non-American ask what you mean by a Dutch Oven for this recipe?

Do you mean the cast iron sort that you put into the ashes of a fire, or do you mean a porcelain dish that you put into an oven (a stove)? (What we in Europe call a casserole)
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Old 07-28-2006, 10:00 PM   #9
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Casserole dish unless you are camping.
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Old 07-29-2006, 12:07 AM   #10
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Dutch oven is also a style of stainless steel or aluminum cookware...
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Old 07-29-2006, 01:15 AM   #11
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Terms have gotten blurred by cookware manufactures calling different things by different names ...

A true Dutch Oven is made of cast iron, has three short legs, and a relatively flat lid with a lip around it to keep the coals from sliding off. Designed to be used on a wood fire ... usually placed directly on the coals with more coals placed on top so that it was heated from above and below ... like an oven. The term "Dutch" probably comes from the Dutch process of sand casting (how they were made), and oven from the way it was heated.

A Camp Oven is also cast iron, without legs, and a domed lid that has a bunch of little spikes on the underside of the lid ... a form of "self basting".

Cast iron pots that are coated with enamel are "French Ovens".

Pots like Sharon depicted are actually a deep casserole.

I can only assume that cookware manufacturers call pots "Dutch Ovens" (which are not) is because they have similar physical dimensions (wider than they are tall) and hoping to capture on "name recognition" from a 50's generation that grew up hearing the term used by their mothers and grandmas.
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Old 08-01-2006, 08:48 PM   #12
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I thought the three leg thing for the fire was called a Spider long ago.
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Old 08-07-2006, 03:44 AM   #13
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very nice! I am very hunger
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Old 12-26-2006, 02:46 PM   #14
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From Michael's description I realise that I have a Camp Oven which I have been calling a Dutch Oven. It was my Great Grandmothers and is more non-stick than most of my non-stick coated cookware.
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Old 12-26-2006, 04:33 PM   #15
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If your cast iron oven is legless and has a domed lid, then you are correct in referring to it as a Dutch Oven. It is the Camp Dutch Oven that has three short legs and a flanged lid.
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Old 12-26-2006, 07:35 PM   #16
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My defintion is...

If it is cast iron...has cast iron lid...and bail....It is a dutch oven!

If it has 3 legs then it is a camp oven....Really has no use in the kitchen.

If it has no legs it is a kitchen oven...Can be used in the kitchen and hung over camp fires.

Thats how I differentiate between the two....

Then there are aluminum camp ovens out there...but I am a iron man myself
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Old 12-26-2006, 10:36 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
If it has 3 legs then it is a camp oven....Really has no use in the kitchen.
I have to respectfully disagree. I've used my camp ovens in my kitchen oven a number of times. All you need to do is place it so that its legs stick through the rack. Cooks as beautifully indoors and it does outdoors.
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Old 12-27-2006, 01:51 PM   #18
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Yo Dutchess...

Yep I have used camp ovens in the kitchen also...I suppose I should have said that is not their primary purpose...That's why I have several of the flat bottom kitchen ovens as well...And I use those over camp fires as well.....
So you see we are in agreement...
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Old 01-18-2007, 03:09 PM   #19
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Ddutch ovens

Dutch oven was the term my grandmother used--pre WW11-I She also called it a "kittle." Not unique. I have her big one. It is like a very heavy, hammerd metal, with domed lid and bail. works a treat for stews, soups. Not pretty, but so often pretty is a misleading attribute.
A spider is a fry pan. I have always known them to be cast iron fry pans, but in some areas of the U.S, spider is used for all fry pans.
My cast iorn fry are totally stick free. 'Course at end of use I fill with water, boil hard for a moment or two, then rinse and wipe with paper towels. Back on the still warm burner to dry with no rust. LOve those babies! It is NOT my imagination--any potato dish is so much better in cast iron. Hash browns, fried, potato pancakes, the list goes on. Well, now I have worked myself into a potato pancake must have it mood. Oh, all the grating! As grandma said, "the little drop of knuckle blood makes it special." With blender, processer (or? er?), they do not have the best flavor. Must be that knuckle blood.
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Old 04-18-2007, 12:21 AM   #20
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I agree, I have used both the legged and legless versions in the stove and on the fire.
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