"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Beef, Pork, Lamb & Venison > Pork
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-13-2020, 02:30 PM   #21
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 23,499
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytrim View Post
........you could cut it up into roasts and chops.... use a bread knife , or a Hack - Saw
That reminds me of some interesting cuts of venison I once saw. A friend had been given some venison by a hunter acquaintance. The pieces were all cubes, ~ 8"x8". The hunter had cut up the meat, with a chain saw, while the entire deer was frozen.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2020, 08:51 AM   #22
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,364
Quote:
Originally Posted by luckytrim View Post
........you could cut it up into roasts and chops.... use a bread knife , or a Hack - Saw
In Navy boot camp, in the butcher shop, we used a band saw to cut frozen meat. About ten years back, I was visiting my sister and her husband in Ohio. At my request, he purchased a pork tenderloin with the ribs still attached. We used a saws-all to remove the chine bones, which were then saved for soup. The rib bones were then frenched and a crown roast was cooked by me.

Using that hack saw, as long as it has been made clean and sterile is a real option. Simply clean all parts thoroughly, put on a new blade, and bake in a 200 degree oven for thirty minutes. Make sure all the parts are metal.

If you are going to use a lnife, partially freeze the meat, and slice as you wish.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2020, 01:44 PM   #23
Senior Cook
 
RCJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Huntington
Posts: 206
I own and use a Food Saver vacuum sealing appliance to seal meat in plastic with. Then I freeze it. It doesn't freezer burn so fast that way.



Occasionally some friends of mine and I buy large pork loin's at Sams Club and break them down, and then use the vacuum sealer to package them. We label & date them before they go into the freezer.

If you don't know how to break down a large pork loin, watch this video.

Cutting a Pork Loin with Dr Bar B Que




Youtube Vaccum seal your plastic bags with a soda straw




Viola......Po'boy's/girl's vacuum sealer. The $100+ bucks for that electric vacuum sealer could buy a lot of pork loin and other stuff
RCJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2020, 01:47 PM   #24
Senior Cook
 
RCJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Huntington
Posts: 206
Error
RCJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2020, 01:53 PM   #25
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,316
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCJoe View Post
If you don't know how to break down a large pork loin, watch this video.

Cutting a Pork Loin with Dr Bar B Que
Good video. And if you want to make your own sausage, bag and freeze the scraps of fat and save them to add to the pork shoulder.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2020, 02:10 PM   #26
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 23,499
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Good video. And if you want to make your own sausage, bag and freeze the scraps of fat and save them to add to the pork shoulder.
Ditto

And I often use some of the loin for sausage, with fat recouped from elsewhere on the
loin. DH really doesn't like to see much fat on his meat, so I get a whole lot more fat scraps than in the video, when I break down an entire or large chunk of pork loin.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2020, 02:18 PM   #27
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,383
There are blades available for cutting meat and bone with a Sawzall.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2020, 05:59 PM   #28
Senior Cook
 
RCJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Huntington
Posts: 206
Blades for a Sawzall to cut bone in meat. Gotta check this out. Thanks !

So there are, $16 at Amazon

RCJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2020, 06:54 PM   #29
Senior Cook
 
RCJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Huntington
Posts: 206
Yes GG when it's sausage making time I keep all of my fresh scraps of fat.
(and there are different grades of fat too)

ind

My 5 lb stuffer. I have a bulk meat mixer, grinder, and smoker.
I like to make Brat's, Knocks, and Mets as well as breakfast links.

Here are some Brats just stuffed.



The plastic lid is from a sterilite shallow plastic clothes container that fits
in the fridge just right. The lid is a nice catch surface for the sausage as it leaves the stuffer. Then the row of sausage can be spun into a string of links where they will cool in the plastic box with lid secured tight. From there to the smoker the next day and then the vacuum sealer and on to the freezer.

At the time of year I'm doing this I'm usually getting out the 10 gallon stone crock to start making sauerkraut.

It is also time to make mincemeat to have for the pies during the holidays. (the heavy dense fat from the kidney area works best in that product)
RCJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2020, 01:06 PM   #30
Honey Badger
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2,604
Wow you guys are just awesome with all of your helpful advice.
I had no idea that a simple question is now 2 pages in. Thank you Hot Shots.
This is the reason why I always ask here. People always get honest helpful advice.
Here I was wondering why my son had bought those particular saw blades
To me it was clutter in the drawer. Duh on me he works at a Mom&Pop butcher shop. So I'm all set to cut it up and use the flavor seal bags to keep the ice crystals out. He said that he could take what I make and seal them professionally at work.


I've got the monster defrosting now in the fridge.
Knowing that my husband has limited space in his freezer a lot of what I'll be preparing for him will stay here with me. I have 2 in the garage and one in the kitchen. If he wants anything in particular, I'm just a phone call away.
Here's a few ideas that I've found that would be easy for him to do on his own. If he gets stuck (Memory, finding words has been hard for him)
We can Face time. I'll walk him through it.

Here we go...Ready?

https://simplygloria.com/bacon-wrapp...ed-pork-chops/
https://www.italianbellavita.com/201...in-roast-from/


Munky.
__________________
If your with me that's great. If not. Get out of my way.
Chef Munky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2020, 01:56 PM   #31
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,316
When I want to make something super simple, I will often make pan-fried pork chops seasoned with some type of Penzeys seasoning blend. Baked potato from the microwave, salad from a bag or sautéed green beans and dinner is served
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2020, 02:55 PM   #32
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 3,849
Sounds good GG! Simple, tasty, quick and ... served!

Munky, truth to tell? I think both those recipes are a little advanced if someone has limited abilities.
But that first one sounds delish! Bacon-wrapped chops.
Now that is something you could do with well chilled chops and send over to him. He can pop those in the oven that day or the next - no big deal. Rice/potatoes, salad or simple green beans with butter as a side.

The second one, I think she is using a Loin Roast NOT a Tenderloin Roast. Looks like a loin in the picture and she mentions fat side up, so not a tenderloin. A lot of people mix up and mistake the two but if you are doing a blog... you really should know better.

That being said, it sounds scrumptious! Something I'm willing to try!
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2020, 04:11 PM   #33
Senior Cook
 
RCJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Huntington
Posts: 206
Time was when grocery store meat departments had charts showing the cuts of meat and what part of the animal they originated from. And meat dept personnel could advise you on the best procedures to follow when cooking it.

But as I've been given to understand the tender loin comes from under the back bone and the loin from above. I may stand corrected in this however.




Some of the old butchers I've spoken with claim that various pieces of meat have been renamed to where the shoppers would be confused and pay a higher price for it. But today much of the meat arrives prepackaged and workers in the big box stores meat departments aren't butcher or even knowledgeable.
RCJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2020, 07:01 AM   #34
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,383
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCJoe View Post
Yes GG when it's sausage making time I keep all of my fresh scraps of fat.
(and there are different grades of fat too)

ind

My 5 lb stuffer. I have a bulk meat mixer, grinder, and smoker.
I like to make Brat's, Knocks, and Mets as well as breakfast links.

Here are some Brats just stuffed.



The plastic lid is from a sterilite shallow plastic clothes container that fits
in the fridge just right. The lid is a nice catch surface for the sausage as it leaves the stuffer. Then the row of sausage can be spun into a string of links where they will cool in the plastic box with lid secured tight. From there to the smoker the next day and then the vacuum sealer and on to the freezer.

At the time of year I'm doing this I'm usually getting out the 10 gallon stone crock to start making sauerkraut.

It is also time to make mincemeat to have for the pies during the holidays. (the heavy dense fat from the kidney area works best in that product)
Part of a 30# batch of andouille just off the smoker. After it cools, it gets separated into meal portion sizes and vacuum sealed. We have the same stuffer as well as an LEM grinder. Been doing homemade sausages for years, starting out with a KA grinding and stuffing attachment. We now buy beef and pork in bulk to grind, instead of paying the grocery prices for prepackaged.

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2020, 09:36 AM   #35
Senior Cook
 
RCJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Huntington
Posts: 206
That's some fine looking doui there Craig. What type of smoker are you using ?
(I build and modify my equipment)

I'm glad you mention LEM's equipment too. That ol'trusty Kitchener of mine
has given good service but I always worry about the nylon gears and the thickness of the sausage I'm stuffing into the casing. The LEM's have metal gears which although adding to the cost does provide an extra measure of reassurance. I don't have a spare set of plastic gears and when I'm stuffing sausage I'd sure hate to break a gear in the middle of a batch. (and I don't have a back up yet)

My bulk mixer can mix a little over 15 lbs of meat & seasonings to prep for the
stuffer. I used to use the KitchenAid Pro with the dough hook but I got a deal on the bulk mixer.

I have several slaughter houses out in the country I can go to to get free ranged at reasonable prices. But to get chicken I go to individuals with small hobby farm operations
where I can pick out my own birds.
RCJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2020, 11:08 AM   #36
Executive Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,408
How old is your KA? Ours is between 25-30 years, don't remember exactly when we got it, and it has all metal gears save 1 sacrificial gear. Unfortunately, we know that for a fact because I stripped it when I tried to make too much pizza dough and Craig had to take it apart and replace.

I will say though, the LEM grinder is much, much faster and easier to use than the KA.
medtran49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2020, 05:32 AM   #37
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,383
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCJoe View Post
That's some fine looking doui there Craig. What type of smoker are you using ?
(I build and modify my equipment)

I'm glad you mention LEM's equipment too. That ol'trusty Kitchener of mine
has given good service but I always worry about the nylon gears and the thickness of the sausage I'm stuffing into the casing. The LEM's have metal gears which although adding to the cost does provide an extra measure of reassurance. I don't have a spare set of plastic gears and when I'm stuffing sausage I'd sure hate to break a gear in the middle of a batch. (and I don't have a back up yet)

My bulk mixer can mix a little over 15 lbs of meat & seasonings to prep for the
stuffer. I used to use the KitchenAid Pro with the dough hook but I got a deal on the bulk mixer.

I have several slaughter houses out in the country I can go to to get free ranged at reasonable prices. But to get chicken I go to individuals with small hobby farm operations
where I can pick out my own birds.
When I have enough to smoke in my Horizon offset, I'll use that. The andouille and tasso were done in it using pecan. My main go to is a large BGE.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2020, 09:35 AM   #38
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,364
If you have a roast still available from your huge piece of meat, here's a suggestion that made a great meal for me and my family. I took the roast, and made a half inch cut downward, parallel with the meat grain. I then cut sideways to form a half inch thick slab of flat pork, with the fat cap on the outside. I spread the meat with a spiced apple/onion mixture, though it would have been great with a cornbread, oe bread stuffing mix as well. Then jelly-roll it all up and tie with butcher's twine. Place fat side up on a rack, over a parchment lined roasting pan. Roast at 370' F. until a meat thermometer reads 150' in the middle. Base as you desire with your own favorite sauce or mop. Serve with gravy, sweet & sour sauce, or fruit based sauce, depending on the filling. Season the outside with S&P before roasting.

Just another idea for your pork, rouladen, yum.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2020, 03:39 PM   #39
Senior Cook
 
RCJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Huntington
Posts: 206
@ Craig, The Egg is about the only cooking grill I haven't had a shot at using yet. I understand they work quite well.

A friend of mine purchased a couple of large flower pots (like for a tree on a patio) and inverted one over the other. His effort to make an "elcheap-o egg". He found a stand for the bottom pot that kept it about 6 inches above the ground and put a pie pan under that. On the inverted pot he drilled some holes thru it's base and used the lid of a coffee can with holes drilled thru it to match those of he made in the pot. Thus he had a damper he could regulate with. He got a grill somewhere that fit into the bottom pot and started experimenting. That was what he called his "Po'Boy's Egg". I think it was about 20 inches wide in the middle. Said he didn't run much of a fire in it did a respectable job. The pots weren't the thin red clay types but rather a thicker clay I believe he said came from Mexico.

For some of us half the fun of cooking is building the equipment.
RCJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
pork, recipe

Boneless PorkLoin Monster? I have a whole 9Lb 4oz frozen whole Pork Loin. It was supposed to be cut up into roasts and chops, that didn't happen:ermm: Does anyone know what I can do with this log? I need to empty out that freezer. 9lbs is a bit much for me. Thank you. Munky. 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.