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Old 01-14-2013, 02:43 PM   #1
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What to do about a wobbly skillet?

I have this old Wagner skillet which I love for the size. It a 12" skillet. The problem is the bottom is not flat. This didn't really make a difference when I had my other stove but now that I have a glass top stove it may have to be relegated to a camping only skillet. Can anything be done?

Here is a pic. Hopefully you can see the gap.

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Old 01-14-2013, 03:21 PM   #2
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If that is CI, you probably aren't supposed to use it on a glass top. Our instuctions for our glass top said CI was a no, no.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:35 PM   #3
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I would save it for outdoor cooking only.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:42 PM   #4
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As far as I have read the reasoning behind this is that the manufacturer doesn't want you calling them up complaining that you scratched or broke your range so they simply tell you not to use it. Honestly this was a hand me down range and so much better than the ugly burners we had and super easy to keep clean. I would prefer gas but since that isn't in the cards right now I am stuck with electric. I don't slide my cast iron around nor do I plan on dropping it but I figure I could do the same damage with my stainless steel. I clean the range (where the rings are) with BKF and so far so good. The rest of my CI is flat on the bottom and even my æbleskiver pans do fine which surprised me.
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Old 01-14-2013, 03:49 PM   #5
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I would save it for outdoor cooking only.
I am thinking that may be the answer. Too bad too. Such a nice pan.
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:43 PM   #6
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Do you know a blacksmith?

Of course, you can buy a brand new 12-inch cast iron skillet for about 30 bucks American, so it would probably not be cost effective to get it flattened.
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:50 PM   #7
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If that is CI, you probably aren't supposed to use it on a glass top. Our instuctions for our glass top said CI was a no, no.

Vita's right. Its perfectly fine to use it on a glass top stove.

The manufacturer tells you that because they dont want to pay out during the warranty period if you scratch or break the top.

Performance wise there are no issues.

Vita, I dont know that there is any way to fix that once it's warped.
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Old 01-14-2013, 04:56 PM   #8
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Do you know a blacksmith?

Of course, you can buy a brand new 12-inch cast iron skillet for about 30 bucks American, so it would probably not be cost effective to get it flattened.
Yeah I won't be buying new when it comes to CI. I prefer the smooth finish of the old pans. I will probably just hold out hope of finding another one at a thrift store or garage sale. eBay works but they are expensive there.
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Old 01-14-2013, 05:09 PM   #9
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Honestly this was a hand me down range and so much better than the ugly burners we had and super easy to keep clean. I would prefer gas but since that isn't in the cards right now I am stuck with electric.
I have a glass cooktop stove myself. Most of my life I've owned and used gas stoves, but I happened to win this one in a contest at work. I was skeptical at first, but it really does a nice job and, like you say, it's easy to keep clean. Plus the oven has a convection feature that I like quite a bit.

So.... if I had my druthers, I would prefer gas, but I have no complaints at all about the glass cooktop. I'm actually surprised that I like it as much as I do.
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Old 01-14-2013, 05:20 PM   #10
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Yeah I won't be buying new when it comes to CI. I prefer the smooth finish of the old pans...

I've heard this comment countless times.

I'm here to say that while the smoother finish of the older pans may please you more than the slightly less smooth finish of a new Lodge, it makes no difference in the non-stick properties. I have a contemporary Lodge 12" skillet and I can fry eggs and and slide them into a dish no problem.

So it may be prettier but not necessarily better.
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Old 01-14-2013, 05:22 PM   #11
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I like my glasstop and its ease of cleaning, and have no problems using CI on it either. Sorry about the warped pan.
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Old 01-14-2013, 05:23 PM   #12
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Vita's right. Its perfectly fine to use it on a glass top stove.

The manufacturer tells you that because they dont want to pay out during the warranty period if you scratch or break the top.

Performance wise there are no issues.

Vita, I dont know that there is any way to fix that once it's warped.
Ha! I bought a unit with a bridge burner just so I could use the lodge griddle. After reading the instructions, I decided against using it. Guess my next batch of Pfannekuchen will be done on the griddle! However, I will continue my "blackening" process outside!
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Old 01-14-2013, 05:34 PM   #13
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A little off topic, but I have Griswold, Wagner, and Lodge Cast Iron, and another brand that is new, that I can't remember right now. The Lodge and the other new brand were both fairly grainy to begin with, but as I've used them, they've smoothed out for the seasoning oil that accumulates between the grains, and are now as smooth and stick-free as my Wagner and Griswold. The advantage of using them is that they cast with move metal, giving them more thermal mass. This is beneficial when pan frying something like a steak, or pan frying chicken in oil. The temperature is more stable once the pan is hot. The thinner Griswold is better for frying eggs, and making roux, and such things. The main problem I have with the Griswold and Wagner pans is that they are hottest where the flame touches the metal, enough so as to make me have to move things like chops, steaks, and bacon around to get them evenly cooked. My little Griswold 6 inch pan, however, is small enough that when heated by my gas burners, it gives me even temperatures across the pan, which is great for making English Muffins, or frying eggs, or any small job.

Now my ten inch Grizwold makes amazing pizza crusts in a 460F' oven. The big Lodge does the same on my Webber charcoal grill. I think the Griswold would get too hot and burn the crust bottom before it was cooked through.

There are benefits to all of my CI. I don't own any junk CI pans. They are all well made, if some weigh just short of a ton.

As for warped pans, they make great campfire pans, and are good for drilling, grinding, and turning into clocks to add a rustic charm to your kitchen.

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Old 01-14-2013, 06:02 PM   #14
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You might try using a trivet or defuser to keep it away from the surface.
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Old 01-14-2013, 06:33 PM   #15
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Now my ten inch Grizwold makes amazing pizza crusts in a 460F' oven. The big Lodge does the same on my Webber charcoal grill. I think the Griswold would get too hot and burn the crust bottom before it was cooked through.

There are benefits to all of my CI. I don't own any junk CI pans. They are all well made, if some weigh just short of a ton.

As for warped pans, they make great campfire pans, and are good for drilling, grinding, and turning into clocks to add a rustic charm to your kitchen.

Seeeeeya' Chief Longwind of the North
Great idea about the pizza! I can use it in the house for pizza.
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Old 01-14-2013, 07:09 PM   #16
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Great idea about the pizza! I can use it in the house for pizza.
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Old 11-12-2013, 01:47 PM   #17
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I know exactly how to remedy the situation.

Take your pan and lay it on hard sturdy surface bottom side up. Handle off to the side. Off of the surface. You do not want to bend the handle! Protect the surface with cardboard or towels folded up.

Take a rubber mallet and give it a good smash right in the middle.
Check on stove to see if you leveled it.
You may have to do this more than once depending on how hard you hit it.

I have to do this with my AL fry pans on rare occasion. It works and will flatten the pan perfectly. CI will be harder to do this with. So use caution of have someone do it for you. It really is easy.
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Old 11-12-2013, 02:15 PM   #18
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A rubber mallet may work on thin alloys but I doubt it'll even make a scratch on CI.
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Old 11-12-2013, 02:36 PM   #19
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With a brittle metal like CI you run the risk of cracking the pan. Relegate it to the camping equipment or use it on the grill.
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Old 11-12-2013, 02:39 PM   #20
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A rubber mallet may work on thin alloys but I doubt it'll even make a scratch on CI.

I've done this with steel pans but used a 3# sledge. Worked like a charm. Cast iron tends to be brittle. A good smack with a hammer may crack the pan ruining it beyond all repair.


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