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Old 06-07-2010, 02:03 PM   #21
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I was never able to get the mayo consistency in a blender. OTOH, with the food processor, I rarely have misses.

I love, love, love homemade mayo. It makes even the best bottled stuff taste stale. Plus you can flavor it to your own tastes, and what you're making it to go with.
followed your suggestion,
Success. JUST YUMMY! it is going on pasta steak salad. thank you so much for imput.
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Old 06-08-2010, 02:45 AM   #22
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I have a milk shake machine...since we no longer drink milk shakes, I tried making mayo and aoli in it and it turned out great. Nice to know that I can keep it around.
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Old 04-17-2011, 05:29 PM   #23
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I use a stick blender to make home made mayo.

1 room temperature egg.
1 lime
a pinch of salt
1/2 cup of oil

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Old 04-17-2011, 06:01 PM   #24
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I have a milk shake machine...since we no longer drink milk shakes, I tried making mayo and aoli in it and it turned out great. Nice to know that I can keep it around.
I know you're a diabetic, but I am too and I have a milk shake blender that sees a lot of use. I make milk shakes with low fat milk, sugar-free frozen yogurt, a tablespoon of Carnation Malted Milk powder and a dash of vanilla or almond extract.

Banana shake: low fat milk, (1) banana (very ripe), sugar-free frozen yogurt.

Or how about an egg creme? In a tall glass add: 2 inches of 2% milk followed by a couple of tablespoons of sugar-free chocolate syrup. Stir briskly! Top it off with Club Soda and carefully stir with a long handle spoon, leaving the milky white foam on top.

I hope these ideas help!
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Old 04-17-2011, 10:15 PM   #25
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Thank you Selkie! Good ideas!
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Old 04-17-2011, 10:49 PM   #26
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Is no one concerned about salmonella from the raw eggs?

I looked at a whack load of sites for how to pasteurize eggs at home. These are the three best I found.

How to pasteurize egg whites for mousses, chiffons, etc. and egg yolks:
Questions and Answers - Raw Eggs, Uncooked Eggs, Pasturization

How to pasteurize whole eggs or egg yolks:
All About EGGS from A to Z - Pasteurization

How to pasteurize egg yolks in the microwave:
How To Make Pasteurized Eggs - Pasteurize Egg Yolks in the Microwave
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:14 AM   #27
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For those of you that mentioned your mayo is runny or saucy, the emulsion didn't form, you probably added the oil too fast. Clean your utensils and start again with another egg yolk and your acid. You can reuse the same liquid, just go slower adding it this time. And I never use all olive oil, did that once, yucky, too heavy a taste.

I've always used raw eggs when making mayo and ceasar salad dressing and we haven't had a problem yet. However, I only use freshly purchased eggs and make sure none in the carton are broken, etc. I can't believe it when I see people pick up cartons of eggs and plop them in their baskets without checking to see if any are broken first.
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Old 04-18-2011, 08:42 AM   #28
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Is no one concerned about salmonella from the raw eggs?

In 2002 the U.S. Department of Agriculture did a Risk Analysis of eggs produced in the US. It indicates that only 2.3 million, out of the 69 billion eggs produced annually, are contaminated with salmonella.

So this really means that only 0.003 % of eggs are infected. Viewed another way, only 1 in every 30,000 eggs is contaminated with salmonella, which shows how uncommon this problem actually is.

Considering the places I travel to and work it very low on the list of my concerns.
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Old 04-18-2011, 08:48 AM   #29
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Don't skimp on the oil. More oil = a thicker mayonnaise. Also keep in mind that it will not have the same texture as store bought.
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Old 04-18-2011, 09:56 AM   #30
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Also keep in mind that it will not have the same texture as store bought.
Which is a good thing! I grew up thinking I hated mayonnaise because of that gelatinous glob of staleness from the jar. It wasn't until I had homemade mayo at a nice restaurant that a whole world of condiments opened up to me like tartar sauce and creamy dressings.
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Old 04-18-2011, 10:25 AM   #31
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Is no one concerned about salmonella from the raw eggs?
Taxlady, I can only speak for myself. I have been making mayonnaise and Aioli for at least 30 years, with raw eggs, and no one, not one single person has ever gotten sick from my mayo, or anything else I have ever made.

There are, however, many recipes out there for "Safe" Mayo. I included one of those in my book. But aside from testing it for my book, I do not make that. I make the other recipe on the same page.

One think I have always done is to wash and dry the eggs before I crack them, no matter what I am using them for. I learned that when I was a little girl gathering eggs on my Aunt's farm. I don't know whether that really takes care of all the germs, but it sure doesn't hurt.

Oh, and at the holidays, I also make eggnog with raw eggs, and no one has ever gotten anything but drunk on that!
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Old 04-18-2011, 10:37 AM   #32
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^^^ ^^^
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Old 04-18-2011, 10:54 AM   #33
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Taxlady, I can only speak for myself. I have been making mayonnaise and Aioli for at least 30 years, with raw eggs, and no one, not one single person has ever gotten sick from my mayo, or anything else I have ever made...

Hmmmm, thirty years of eggs and never a problem. Given the published odds, I'd say you are about due for that one in 30,000.
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Old 04-18-2011, 11:30 AM   #34
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I've read in the past that it's not an issue of rolling the dice... a large part of the concern lies in your source and how you handle the eggs. I remember a funny thing Emeril used to say, "If you leave your potato salad in the back of a 150º car all day, then you get what you deserve!". Buy fresh eggs from a reputable source, keep them chilled, and remember to refrigerate dishes with mayo in them. If you have the salad out on the picnic table for half the day... it's probably a good idea to toss any leftovers. Better yet, only put out what you plan to consume... you can always refill the bowl.

I've never had issues either, nor have I with eating sushi, rare beef, pork cooked to 140-145ºF, or chicken/turkey cooked to 160-165ºF.
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Old 04-18-2011, 11:40 AM   #35
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I've read in the past that it's not an issue of rolling the dice... a large part of the concern lies in your source and how you handle the eggs. I remember a funny thing Emeril used to say, "If you leave your potato salad in the back of a 150º car all day, then you get what you deserve!". Buy fresh eggs from a reputable source, keep them chilled, and remember to refrigerate dishes with mayo in them. If you have the salad out on the picnic table for half the day... it's probably a good idea to toss any leftovers. Better yet, only put out what you plan to consume... you can always refill the bowl.

I've never had issues either, nor have I with eating sushi, rare beef, pork cooked to 140-145ºF, or chicken/turkey cooked to 160-165ºF.

Excellent advice Nicholas but not to the point. How you handle food does not cancel out the effects of eating an egg contaminated with salmonella from the gitgo.

I'm not sure a reputable supplier is the answer either, as I doubt all laying chickens are tested for salmonella and are kept in sanitary conditions that inhibit the spread of the bacteria.

It's my understanding that chickens are inoculated against salmonella in the UK. I wonder what that would add to the cost of an egg.
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Old 04-18-2011, 11:59 AM   #36
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I can't find any reliable statistics for incidence of salmonella in eggs, but 1 in 30,000 (in the U.S.) seems to be outdated and closer to 1 in 20,000 now. There are many international members and visitors here and I would hate it if someone got a false sense of security about raw eggs from reading here.

from Fact Sheets for At-Risk and Underserved Populations

The people most at risk for foodborne illness are:

Infants and young children
pregnant women
older adults
people with weakened immune systems caused by:
cancer treatment
diabetes
AIDS
bone marrow and organ transplants
I hope people aren't serving food that contains raw eggs to people in the above list without warning them.
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Old 04-18-2011, 12:16 PM   #37
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The handling of an egg certainly contributes to the level of harmful organisms present. If you had the option of eating a fresh egg and one that had sat incubated at 100ºF for 2 months which would you choose?

A healthy adult must consume the organism at large levels to bring on ill effects. There is actually quite a bit of Salmonella contamination at minute levels in many locations you interact with on a daily basis.

Purchasing from an industrial farm that has poor waste handling techniques, and then distribution through a large chain has much larger variability than purchasing direct from a farmer or local source that uses open production and fewer links between the chicken and your plate. This has been statistically proven in many independent studies.

Also, while testing is a good sign it doesn't ensure safety. You could get a bad batch of eggs from a farm that meets standard requirements on a regular basis.
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Old 04-18-2011, 12:20 PM   #38
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I should mention that I agree to some extent with taxlady. I always tell elderly people out of health and pregnant women who might eat my mayo-based dishes that they include raw egg, and that it poses an infinitesimally small but measurable risk. I also do the same for pretty much any meat that I cook.
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Old 04-18-2011, 12:25 PM   #39
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I should mention that I agree to some extent with taxlady. I always tell elderly people out of health and pregnant women who might eat my mayo-based dishes that they include raw egg, and that it poses an infinitesimally small but measurable risk. I also do the same for pretty much any meat that I cook.

We should all be doing this. No one wants to be the cause of another's illness or worse.
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Old 04-18-2011, 01:20 PM   #40
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Hmmmm, thirty years of eggs and never a problem. Given the published odds, I'd say you are about due for that one in 30,000.
Well, actually, Andy, if I counted all the years I cooked with Mom in her kitchen with no eggy mishaps, it's more like 60.
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