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Mudtimud 04-30-2011 01:38 AM

The Simplest & Tastiest Fish Recipe
 
It's so easy!

BLACKENED SALMON RECIPE

All you need is a slab of salmon (wiped with paper towel), garlic powder, onion powder and Carjun Spices and olive oil.

Lay the salmon skin side down and cover the flesh facing up with Carjun spices, with a teaspoonful earch of garlic and onion powder.

Film the pan with olive oil and wait for it to smoke, and carefully place the salmon skin side down onto the pan. Flip it once when the opacity reaches 2/3 the thickness of the salmon, so that the powdered side is facing downwards. High heat for 4 mins (depending on your stove) until the bottom is between dark golden brown and black.

Serve, blackened side up.

Bon Apetite!

Great. Now I'm hungry again.

I know this is a simplified version of blackened fish. Any ideas to make it even better? Carjun spices is the most fragrant mix of powdered spice I know. you guys happen to know any other good mixes?

buckytom 04-30-2011 02:21 AM

muddy, what brand of cajun spices do you use? i'd imagine each is different. i happen to like a few of emeril's spice blends.

i've never tried blackening fish but my family loves the stuff. i'd love to give it a go.

interesting that you used olive oil that has a low smoke point.

merstar 04-30-2011 03:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mudtimud (Post 994711)
It's so easy!

BLACKENED SALMON RECIPE

All you need is a slab of salmon (wiped with paper towel), garlic powder, onion powder and Carjun Spices and olive oil.

Lay the salmon skin side down and cover the flesh facing up with Carjun spices, with a teaspoonful earch of garlic and onion powder.

Film the pan with olive oil and wait for it to smoke, and carefully place the salmon skin side down onto the pan. Flip it once when the opacity reaches 2/3 the thickness of the salmon, so that the powdered side is facing downwards. High heat for 4 mins (depending on your stove) until the bottom is between dark golden brown and black.

Serve, blackened side up.

Bon Apetite!

Great. Now I'm hungry again.

I know this is a simplified version of blackened fish. Any ideas to make it even better? Carjun spices is the most fragrant mix of powdered spice I know. you guys happen to know any other good mixes?

Smoked Paprika would be a great addition to the spice mix.

Fabiabi 04-30-2011 03:44 AM

I recently had a piece of salmon that had been lightly smoked and it was gorgeous. I've never liked salmon and had always found it too rich. This was beautiful. I had it with some steamed vegetables.

Mudtimud 04-30-2011 05:47 AM

I almost forgot the most important part! Blacken salmon won't be complete without a drizzle of lemon juice. I like to use green lemons because they tend to have the sour of lemon combined with the zest of lime.

@buckytom
I use the brand MasterFoods.
I'm not good with picking the right oil type according to the dish. I picked olive oil because it is healthier =p
What oil should I use? I do have canola oil which has a different kind of fragrance but i'm not sure if it's suitable.

@merstar
Cajun spices already has paprika in the mix but I'm not sure it is smoked. I'm sure to look out for smoked paprika the next time I head to the store.

@Fabiabi
Cool! I can never seem to find smoked salmon at the store.

CraigC 04-30-2011 06:41 AM

I hope you are doing this outside?:ermm: When I "blacken" anything, I use the jet cooker to get my CI pan white hot. When the butter hits the pan, the smoke is intense, then more so when the spice covered protein goes in and a final fury after the protein is flipped and the finish of butter goes on top. The butter was already melted, so it flows off and hits the pan.

For the spice, I use a recipe from Paul Prudhomme.

Craig

Mudtimud 04-30-2011 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CraigC (Post 994742)
I hope you are doing this outside?:ermm: When I "blacken" anything, I use the jet cooker to get my CI pan white hot. When the butter hits the pan, the smoke is intense, then more so when the spice covered protein goes in and a final fury after the protein is flipped and the finish of butter goes on top. The butter was already melted, so it flows off and hits the pan.

For the spice, I use a recipe from Paul Prudhomme.

Craig

Wow! That sounds pretty intense (and tasty). I can almost smell it from here. =D
Nope. I did it in my kitchen with a regular stove. I just turn the knob to the highest heat after I flipped it to the powdered spice side down, until there's just enough black to satisfy my charred bitter cravings. Heheh... am I doing it wrong?
Will definitely try out Paul Prudhomme's Cajun mix but maybe I'll modify it with smoked paprika, if I can find those.
Is butter a better oil base than olive oil for this recipe? I'm totally clueless when it comes to deciding which oil to film the pan with. I'm just guessing but I fear butter might add to the already rich flavour of the salmon which may not be to Fabiabi's liking. I have no qualms if its any other meat. "Too rich". That's the complaint I always hear when I ask about salmon. But for some reason, kids LOVE it. They'd pick salmon over white meat fish anyday, and in that case, butter might be a good boost to the flavour. Correct me if I'm wrong.

CraigC 04-30-2011 12:40 PM

I've always used butter. For oil, I would use a neutral type like canola as I think olive oil would give an off taste. I don't like salmon, except as gravlox or smoked (lox or nova). When I blacken fish, it is usually black grouper at least 1-1/2" to 2" thick. I really like thick ribeye steaks and chicken breast done with this technique. We have a couple salads we like using the steak and chicken in, respectively.

Craig

merstar 04-30-2011 02:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mudtimud (Post 994731)
I almost forgot the most important part! Blacken salmon won't be complete without a drizzle of lemon juice. I like to use green lemons because they tend to have the sour of lemon combined with the zest of lime.

@merstar
Cajun spices already has paprika in the mix but I'm not sure it is smoked. I'm sure to look out for smoked paprika the next time I head to the store.

The paprika in Cajun Seasoning is generally not smoked. Do check out the smoked paprika - it gives a great flavor and kick to a lot of dishes.

powerplantop 04-30-2011 06:27 PM

This guy is doing a good job at it, even if he is a bit weak on the seasoning.
YouTube - How to Blacken Fish - Blackening Sea Bass - Fish Recipe

powerplantop 05-04-2011 01:54 PM

After reading this tread I had to do some myself. This is how I do it.
For the Spice mix I used Paul Prudhommes recipie

YouTube - Blackened Catfish

ChefJune 05-05-2011 11:55 AM

Blackened Fish was VERY trendy about 30 years ago. Chefs and home cooks tried it on just about every fish imaginable.

some interesting caveats....

1. It's not likely that your home stove will get hot enough to really "blacken" the fish. If it does, your kitchen may end up on fire. Restaurant chefs generally caution home cooks on this sad fact. You can season your fish with the spices, but real "blackening" needs to be done in a restaurant kitchen for safety's sake.

2. If you love the taste of the fish, be warned that the blackening spices are likely to take over the flavor.

CraigC 05-05-2011 12:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChefJune (Post 996482)
Blackened Fish was VERY trendy about 30 years ago. Chefs and home cooks tried it on just about every fish imaginable.

some interesting caveats....

1. It's not likely that your home stove will get hot enough to really "blacken" the fish. If it does, your kitchen may end up on fire. Restaurant chefs generally caution home cooks on this sad fact. You can season your fish with the spices, but real "blackening" needs to be done in a restaurant kitchen for safety's sake.

2. If you love the taste of the fish, be warned that the blackening spices are likely to take over the flavor.

Yup, "blackened" technique needs to be done outside for the home cook. CI is the proper way to go and it needs to be white hot. I've never lost the taste of the grouper due to the thickness of the cut I use and the speed at which it cooks in that white hot pan.:wink:

Craig

Selkie 05-05-2011 01:35 PM

I'm not a fan of anything blackened - too much pepper. Char-crispy, yes. Blackened with spices, no.

Sprout 05-05-2011 06:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CraigC (Post 996500)
Yup, "blackened" technique needs to be done outside for the home cook. CI is the proper way to go and it needs to be white hot. I've never lost the taste of the grouper due to the thickness of the cut I use and the speed at which it cooks in that white hot pan.:wink:

Craig

I dunno, at work we cook our blackened chicken on the grill and I think it comes out mighty tasty! Well they start it on the grill to blacken the spices, then finish it in the oven. Probably more for lack of space on the grill than anything else. I never thought I'd say this, but I think this is one dish I'd like better on a gas grill than charcoal. With all the other flavors going on, I fear the added smoke might put it over the edge.

CraigC 05-05-2011 06:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sprout (Post 996642)
I dunno, at work we cook our blackened chicken on the grill and I think it comes out mighty tasty! Well they start it on the grill to blacken the spices, then finish it in the oven. Probably more for lack of space on the grill than anything else. I never thought I'd say this, but I think this is one dish I'd like better on a gas grill than charcoal. With all the other flavors going on, I fear the added smoke might put it over the edge.

Then the technique is not being applied as originally intended. You're just grilling using the blackening spices, IMO. The pure form is done in a screaming hot, CI pan. Grilling just can't sear the spices properly and render the best results.:wink:

Craig

Caslon 05-05-2011 09:48 PM

I haven't made it in awhile, but any white fish fillets topped with chunky blue cheese dressing and chopped green onions and some crushed bread crumbs, then baked, is simple and surprisingly tasty.
White fish is becoming increasingly expensive, especially cod. Overfishing and environmental changes probably. Cod which was so abundant and economical is like buying shrimp or lobster now.

ChefJune 05-06-2011 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caslon (Post 996690)
I haven't made it in awhile, but any white fish fillets topped with chunky blue cheese dressing and chopped green onions and some crushed bread crumbs, then baked, is simple and surprisingly tasty.
White fish is becoming increasingly expensive, especially cod. Overfishing and environmental changes probably. Cod which was so abundant and economical is like buying shrimp or lobster now.

Shrimp is delicious done in a similar manner. Remember to peel them first!

MyCrummyApartment 05-06-2011 02:45 PM

I am not big on blackening salmon as per OP, but I admit I have never done it either. Blackening a fish to me is much better suited for a white fish which often needs help in the zinger (flavor pumper) department.

As for Salmon... rather than look to your cupboard for spices, look to your fridge for dressings or condiments, such as dill pesto, rock mustard, creamy onion salad dressing, as for dry seasoning... Montreal Steak Spice.. goes great with fresh grilled salmon.

Scattergun2570 05-22-2011 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MyCrummyApartment (Post 996910)
I am not big on blackening salmon as per OP, but I admit I have never done it either. Blackening a fish to me is much better suited for a white fish which often needs help in the zinger (flavor pumper) department.

As for Salmon... rather than look to your cupboard for spices, look to your fridge for dressings or condiments, such as dill pesto, rock mustard, creamy onion salad dressing, as for dry seasoning... Montreal Steak Spice.. goes great with fresh grilled salmon.


I am curious as to how you would prepare a piece of Salmon with the Montreal Spice,,please elaborate if you would.


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