Are popovers supposed to be hollow in the middle?

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BAPyessir6

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I haven't eaten/made a popover in at least 8 years, and I can't remember if they're supposed to be similar to a pate a choux interior/eclair. I followed a recipe today (which had me blend the batter for 30 seconds), all ingredients room temp, heat pan, bake 450 20 minutes then reduce temp to 350 and bake 10. (I also did cave and buy a popover pan). They looked great, puffed up tall, but when I opened one up, they had an eggy, full/dense interior. I can't remember if they're supposed to be hollow or not. What did I do wrong? Maybe I should've mixed the batter by hand? I've heard blending can over develop/shred gluten. I don't know if this affected the final produce or if they're supposed to be like this. (Yeah I know it's tiny but this was 20 minutes out of the oven and it settled. Nonetheless, it didn't seem very hollow fresh out of the oven).
 

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Yes, pretty much. They should have large holes in the interior. I'm not sure they baked long enough at the lower temperature. Were they doughy still? I normally use a whisk to mix.
 
to me, pop-overs are hollow.
don't know what went wrong for you.
I don't ever remember lowering the heat to bake. But admit it has been eons since I've made them.

Traditionally they were made under the Sunday roast in the drippings of fat that came off said roast.
I used to put the batter into the muffin tins with the extremely hot heated oil. Strangely enough several recipes I just looked at "never mention preheating the oil in the pans".
 
I kind of think it was the recipe. I noticed that the bad recipe made 6 popovers, and another recipe I tried right after (that turned out way better) used half the amount of batter to make 5. The popover tins were only half full that time, versus the first eggy/bad batch I made they were like 3/4 or more full.
 
They should be moist and eggy but not dense. Not as distinctly hollow as pate au Choux but fairly airy.

Yours look a bit dense…
 
It's crucial not to overwork the dough for popovers, or you'll end up with too much gluten development. Try mixing the dough by hand, gently combining the ingredients just until they come together well. This might help avoid a dense texture inside the popovers.
 
I make Yorkshire pudding in pie plate and small individuals (mini Dutch ovens, about 10 oz. - popovers?). I always use butter. I place cold butter in pan/plate and place in preheated oven to melt. Immediately adding batter when melted.

yorkshire_pudding_new_year_010123_2_IMG_0492.jpg


mini_yorkshire_pudding_012316_P1090951.JPG
 
BTW, neither is hollow in the middle. Both puff up and leave an indent in the middle, just right for gravy. LOL
 
to me, pop-overs are hollow.
don't know what went wrong for you.
I don't ever remember lowering the heat to bake. But admit it has been eons since I've made them.

Traditionally they were made under the Sunday roast in the drippings of fat that came off said roast.
I used to put the batter into the muffin tins with the extremely hot heated oil. Strangely enough several recipes I just looked at "never mention preheating the oil in the pans".
I never have enough roast drippings/fat in my pan. I use a cast iron pan with a rack in it to roast my beef. When the roast is done, I remove the meat and rack. I make my gravy right in the pan. So I can get all that nice fond in the gravy.
 
Back when I was making them so rarely even did a roast much less be able to garner the drippings. Always used vegie oil/butter/lard.
 
I never have enough roast drippings/fat in my pan. I use a cast iron pan with a rack in it to roast my beef. When the roast is done, I remove the meat and rack. I make my gravy right in the pan. So I can get all that nice fond in the gravy.
I do this with all my roasted meats. The gravy tastes so good with the drippings and fond.
 

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