I have a very mild seafish

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pengyou

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
409
Location
Beijing
I can buy a mild seafish at the local supermarkets. It is sold frozen and is one of the cheapest seafish I can buy - I don't like to buy or even think to buy freshwater fish here.

It has a very mild flavor but I don't know the name of it. The fillets are usually 7-12" long and about 1/2" thick, or a little thinner.

I want to find ways to eat more fish but there is just not enough flavor in this fish to make it interesting. I have had a kind of finger food that was made up of small pieces of fish - similar to this - wrapped in bacon with the chinese golden needle mushrooms. Again, I would not know how to cook this dish.

Any ideas? or other suggestions?
 

BigAL

Sous Chef
Joined
Jan 3, 2008
Messages
709
Location
W.KS
How about a pan fry or deep fry in either a beer batter or flour/corn meal mix? Could do a fish and chips(I prefer onion rings) type of thing.

"Fish in foil", season the fish and add jalapeno, onion, green pepper, butter, evoo, lemon, lime, more butter, then seal up and put in oven or on grill.

Cioppino?

Seafood chili :: Cooking For Dads ::
I've made this twice and I love it. I used shrimp, oysters, clams, and crab to total 2-2.5#'s. Then I added Tony C's for a "kick" and it reminded me of seafood gumbo. Easy to make.....or I wouldn't/couldn't do it.
 

GrillingFool

Head Chef
Joined
Jun 21, 2007
Messages
2,223
Location
usa
Let the fish be the carrier for your herbs and spices.

Tilapia is a mild fish... i like to lightly spray it with olive oil, then coat it
with a mixture of citrus and spicy flavorings. I then bake it with some onions,
garlic and tomato slices on top.
Research how to Poach a Fish... that is a good way to flavor mild fish too.
 

FincaPerlitas

Senior Cook
Joined
Nov 12, 2008
Messages
285
Location
San Jose, Costa Rica, Central America
I owned a seafood restaurant for many years in Florida and used this sauce and preparation technique for both fish and shellfish, always with great results. I think that once you try it, it will become one of your favorites too. You can make the sauce ahead of time and refrigerate. Once your sauce is ready, the actual prep and cooking time is only a few minutes.


Scampi Sauce

2 Tbsp butter
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp shallots, minced
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 cup parsley, chopped
1/4 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup chicken broth
2-3 Tbsp lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste

Saute shallots, garlic and 1/2 the parsley in butter and oil. Add wine and chicken broth. Reduce and refrigerate. When ready to use, reheat and add lemon juice, remaining parsley, and salt and pepper to taste.

NOTE: I use this with jumbo shrimp and scallops (U6 to U10) and with yellowtail snapper or any other mild, white fish fillets. With all of them, I dredge the seafood lightly in seasoned flour then dip in a thin egg wash, about equal parts egg and water, the idea being to coat them just enough to brown them and for the sauce to adhere. Saute quickly in clarified butter then finish in a hot oven. Garnish with a little chopped parsley or thinly sliced lemon and serve immediately. In a home kitchen, you may want to omit the last step and finish them on the stovetop. I've sometimes been asked how to make the sauce thicker. I like the consistency as it is, but the best way to thicken it is by adding a little bechamel sauce.
 

CraigC

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Messages
6,483
Let the fish be the carrier for your herbs and spices.

Tilapia is a mild fish... i like to lightly spray it with olive oil, then coat it
with a mixture of citrus and spicy flavorings. I then bake it with some onions,
garlic and tomato slices on top.
Research how to Poach a Fish... that is a good way to flavor mild fish too.

Leave it long enough in the citrus juice and you probably won't need to cook it with heat.;)

Craig
 

Bigjim68

Head Chef
Joined
Jan 27, 2008
Messages
1,313
Location
Richmond, Va
Cheap mild frozen fillets are quite possibly Arrowtooth Flounder. I sometimes buy it, IMO it must not be overcooked as it turns mushy quickly. It is a good food source, very sustainable, and is often a byproduct of other fisheries. Due to its mild flavor, it takes spices and herbs well.

Here is the official description: From NOAA

Arrowtooth Flounder (Atheresthes stomias)


  • Arrowtooth flounder populations are very healthy and are harvested at sustainable levels.
  • The arrowtooth fishery off the West Coast is limited by market demand and bycatch limits for rockfish. In Alaska, arrowtooth were typically only caught incidentally in fisheries targeting other species, but a directed fishery has recently developed for the species. Catch is limited by market demand and halibut bycatch limits.
  • Flounder is a good, low-fat source of B vitamins and an excellent source of niacin. For more on nutrition, see Nutrition Facts. (USDA)
  • Arrowtooth flounder muscle rapidly degrades when heated, resulting in a paste-like texture when cooked. In the past, this breakdown has limited efforts to develop a market for this fish. Recently however, several food additives have been successful in stopping this breakdown, increasing the marketability of arrowtooth flounder products as inexpensive flounder. To make it more marketable, arrowtooth is often sold on the West Coast as turbot, although it is not related to the true turbot (Psetta maxima), a highly-valued fish caught off Europe.
 

Bigjim68

Head Chef
Joined
Jan 27, 2008
Messages
1,313
Location
Richmond, Va
I owned a seafood restaurant for many years in Florida and used this sauce and preparation technique for both fish and shellfish, always with great results. I think that once you try it, it will become one of your favorites too. You can make the sauce ahead of time and refrigerate. Once your sauce is ready, the actual prep and cooking time is only a few minutes.


Scampi Sauce

2 Tbsp butter
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp shallots, minced
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 cup parsley, chopped
1/4 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup chicken broth
2-3 Tbsp lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste

Saute shallots, garlic and 1/2 the parsley in butter and oil. Add wine and chicken broth. Reduce and refrigerate. When ready to use, reheat and add lemon juice, remaining parsley, and salt and pepper to taste.

NOTE: I use this with jumbo shrimp and scallops (U6 to U10) and with yellowtail snapper or any other mild, white fish fillets. With all of them, I dredge the seafood lightly in seasoned flour then dip in a thin egg wash, about equal parts egg and water, the idea being to coat them just enough to brown them and for the sauce to adhere. Saute quickly in clarified butter then finish in a hot oven. Garnish with a little chopped parsley or thinly sliced lemon and serve immediately. In a home kitchen, you may want to omit the last step and finish them on the stovetop. I've sometimes been asked how to make the sauce thicker. I like the consistency as it is, but the best way to thicken it is by adding a little bechamel sauce.
This is the type of recipe I would use with this fish. High heat, quick cooking, and lots of outside flavor.
 
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