Painting the Smoker

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bknox

Head Chef
Joined
Jul 5, 2005
Messages
2,121
Location
Cicero, IL, but my heart is in Virginia where my f
I am wondering, and I do a lot of that mid winter, can I use engine paint to paint my smoker?

Come spring I want to sand off some rust and paint my smoker but I do not want to screw it up. I would rather have rust than paint burning while I cook.

Any and all thoughts are welcome.

Thanks in advance!
 

bigwheel

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 25, 2005
Messages
9,951
Location
Foat Wuth
If its an offset with an uninsulated firebox there aint any paint out there which I have happen to stumble over which will stick for very long on the firebox. This includes engine paint..stove paint etc. Best strategy for the firebox is to keep it oiled up and seasoned like a cast iron skillet. Meaning swab it down wth oil..PAM or even know a few folks who claim to use WD 40 on there. Swab or squirt it down while its still warm but not hot after you get done cooking..after rainstorms if it sets outside..and sometimes just do it when you aint got nothing mo betta to do. It should over time turn a shade of black (or blue if you use WD 40 or that whut the fella said anyway). On the rest of the pit cookchamber etc..you can paint it with high temp Stove Paint. I have some 1200 degree Dupont stove paint that sticks purty good to them parts..or you could try the engine paint if you can find it cheaper or whutever. Hope this helps. Just my dos centavos of course:) Now Dave Klose supposed to have some paint they use on the space shuttle which might stick on the firebox but I think it purty expensive.

bigwheel
 

Unity

Executive Chef
Joined
Jun 24, 2006
Messages
2,694
Location
Virginia near Washington DC
Forrest Paint Company said:
Stove Bright High-Temp Powder (653)
Based on years of experience with our Stove Bright™ high temperature paint, we have formulated a silicone powder coating with heat resistance up to 1200°F. This product line is suitable for a wide variety of applications including fireplaces, barbeques, heating appliances, automotive mufflers and headers, and other industrial applications. Click here for more information.
--John
(I don't know how good it is, I just searched "heat resistant powder coat.")
 

Smokey_Joe

Head Chef
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Messages
2,378
Location
North Central Massachusetts
I have stove paint on both my pits

The small one has several (about 4) coats of green
"Rustoleum BBQ & Woodstove" spray-bomb paint.
And it's holding up perfectly fine. Have had several
hot HOT fires in the offset and smaller fires in the grill
itself, and except for smoke staining around openings
and food stains....it's like the day I put it on.



My big pit's offset is a modified woodstove... the firebox
and the cooker are brush painted with about 4 coats of
black "Rustoleum BBQ & Woodstove" 2 quart cans of paint.
And that is looking fine also..... I KNOW the firebox on that
thing has hit extreme temperatures.

 

Smokey_Joe

Head Chef
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Messages
2,378
Location
North Central Massachusetts
Chuck_050382 said:
[quote="Smokey_Joe":5b4yd79f]I have stove paint on both my pits

Joe: did you prime the pits first or just apply the stove paint directly to the metal? also how well did you clean up the metal first?[/quote:5b4yd79f]

Threw a wire wheel in my air-whiz tool and cleaned the rough and
loose stuff off, then wiped it down with a rag wet with Dupont
reducer....let it dry for about 15 minutes, then painted
 
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