Piadina bread or tortillas

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oldcoot

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 4, 2003
Messages
487
Location
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Never heard of "padina bread", but I've fooled around a bit with tortillas.

For flour tortillas, make a dough of flour, salt, and water - soft but not sticky. Roll out on floured surface to less than 1/8 inch thick. Use a plate of the appropriate siz to serve as a guide for cutting a circle of dough. Lay on HOT, dry griddle. Blisters will form. When the undeerside develops small brown spots, turn it over until the second side has thos same spots. Stack and keep warm until served.

For Corn Tortillas (the best kind), you must use MASA HARINAQ. This is available as a dry flour or, if there is a Mexican store around, they may have the ready made dough.

Using the flour (corn, treated with lye much like is done to hominy, then dried and ground) simply mix with water to form a pliablen non-sticky dough. Proceed as for flour tortillas.

Note, the dough will work better if allowed to stand (rest) for a while, then work it into balls, pat them out into a thin disk, and fry on dry hot griddle. If you aren't adept at patting out thin discs [and who, besides a Mexican Senoa is?] then roll them out with a rolling pin.


Really simple and easy except for the patting operation.
 

oldcoot

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 4, 2003
Messages
487
Location
USA,California
O.K., so "Pianina Bread" is a so called flat bread of italian origin..

Use a white bread recipe (flour, salt, yeast, water) to make a not too soft dough. Let rise for an hour or so, punch down, form into disks about 1/4 in ch thick. Prik all over with a fork, fry in a hot, dry pan until golden on both sides.

Sounds pretty simple, too.

Not a "true" flat bread, as it contains yeast. One recipe called for carbonated water, too! :D

I'm beginning to think every Italian Baker puts a name on his bread - Piadina, Ciabatta, Focaccio,.......They all use almost identical ingredients in similar quantities - the big diffeence seems to be the shape.
 

oldcoot

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 4, 2003
Messages
487
Location
USA,California
Ooops! - you meant ITALIAN ORTILLAS, didn't you? Sorry - I'm a slow study.

Can't find a reciipe for italian tortillas, but several of how they're served. Sounds very suspiciously like Mexican enchiladas: filling of your choice rolled up ain a flour tortilla, placed in a baking pand and covered with sace and cheeses, and baked. The recipes call for 8 inch flour tortillas.
 

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