Pink salt/kosher salt ratio

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Rocklobster

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I did 1000 grams of kosher salt to 2 grams of pink salts ..I got this ratio from a you tube video..I added other seasonings ad I didn't end up using all of the curing salt as I shrink wrapped the piece of pork belly, which I am attempting to make panchetta out of..It is well covered and should render loads of fluids in the next day or two to create it's own brine..I am just worried that when I go to the next stage, which will be hanging for another month, it will be safe to eat..
 
I did 1000 grams of kosher salt to 2 grams of pink salts ..I got this ratio from a you tube video..I added other seasonings ad I didn't end up using all of the curing salt as I shrink wrapped the piece of pork belly, which I am attempting to make panchetta out of..It is well covered and should render loads of fluids in the next day or two to create it's own brine..I am just worried that when I go to the next stage, which will be hanging for another month, it will be safe to eat..
Sounds like an interesting project. Do you have a question, or are you looking for reassurance? ;)
 
Sounds like an interesting project. Do you have a question, or are you looking for reassurance? ;)
Both, I guess..there are many different recipes and techniques available on the internet..I'm not too worried of the finished product as far a flavor goes, that I can work on, but just want reassurance that there is enough nitrites to take care of the potential bacteria..many recipes have formulas based on quantity of meat and I just used enough salt to amply cover the pork, then shrink wrap it..I'm confident it will be well exposed to seasoning and salt, I'm just worried there wasn't enough pink salts..
 
Get yourself a copy of Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman. It is an amazing wealth of knowlege on the subject. I will look in my copy of the book when I can, and see if I can answer your question... but get that book!

CD

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When I made bresaola I worried about that too. I think I did a thread on here about making it. Pretty sure I used one of Rhulman's recipes, whether it was out of one of his books I had originally gotten for Craig or one off his website, I don't remember. It worked though. However, I will admit I ate a little piece a day or 2 before we actually ate a substantial amount of it just to be sure as I didn't want both of us getting sick.
 
Get yourself a copy of Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman. It is an amazing wealth of knowlege on the subject. I will look in my copy of the book when I can, and see if I can answer your question... but get that book!

CD

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Ruhlman's book has three pages, with good illustrations, on making pancetta. Pages 44-46.

He lists 12 grams of pink salt and 50 grams of kosher salt, plus other herbs and spices for a 3.35-kilogram slab of pork belly.

CD
 
Ruhlman's book has three pages, with good illustrations, on making pancetta. Pages 44-46.

He lists 12 grams of pink salt and 50 grams of kosher salt, plus other herbs and spices for a 3.35-kilogram slab of pork belly.

CD
Just got the book from Amazon a few days ago.Slowly checking it out but I fall asleep before I can read much of it..lol..I have a few slabs of wild boar belly I want to make the panchetta out of..not sure I am going to trust the first go, it is still shrink wrapped going on a week now. Maybe I'll just rinse it off, dry it up and shrink wrap it in small pieces and then freeze. This way I don't waste it and can use if for different applications.
Then, I can start over with direction from this book..thanks for the tip..it looks really good..
 
Many years ago I went through a phase of curing meat. The book I used was Jane Grigson's "Charcuterie and French Pork Cooking". It went into curing meat in detail for the domestic cook. I never had a failure or poisoned anyone and the results were excellent.


It was published in 1967 and has been out of print for some years but Amazon regularly has second-hand copies on sale.


I understand Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's "The River Cottage Meat Book" has useful information regarding preservation. Available on Amazon in the US.


Both these books are aimed at the domestic cook rather than the commercial trade.
 
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