Recommend me uses for rice flour!

The friendliest place on the web for anyone that enjoys cooking.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

BAPyessir6

Senior Cook
Joined
May 15, 2020
Messages
212
Location
Prior Lake
I have both glutinous and normal, and I use glutinous a lot to make mochi, nian gao, butter mochi, etc. but I never know what to use normal rice flour for! Any suggestions? (I'm not big into gluten free as I overeat lots of it (as my sister is gluten free and she makes lots of gluten/rice/potato free) so it'd be cool if I could find other uses.)
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20240426-212052.png
    Screenshot_20240426-212052.png
    566.3 KB · Views: 32
I would use it up by ‘burying’ small amounts of it in recipes that use more common ingredients.

Swapping a 1/4-1/2 cup of the AP flour for rice flour shouldn’t make much difference in most recipes.

Substituting larger amounts may not be exactly one for one.

Good luck!
 
Last edited:
You can use regular rice flour for breading meat, fish, or vegetables before frying. It gives them a crispy texture and is also used in homemade facial masks. It can help soften, cleanse, and brighten the skin
 
I remember seeing a YouTuber kneading something that they didn't want to add more gluten to. So, they dusted the table with rice flour to prevent the dough from sticking to the table.
 
In general I don't use white rice for anything but I had a lot of it so I ground it into flour. I've been using that flour for a crustless pumpkin pie recipe for 5 years now. It is a thickener.

This is my Crustless Pumpkin Pie (oil free)

2 and 1/3 C plant milk or cow milk (2 cups makes a firmer pie, very nice)
1 and 1/2 T cornstarch
1 T tapioca flour
3/4 C rice flour
3 cups pumpkin/squash cooked-fresh ( or you can use cooked frozen and I've used 1 cup dehydrated squash chunks and fill the blender to 3 cups w/water, blend and let thicken)
1 T baking powder (which I skip)
1/2 C honey or maple syrup or other sweetener
1 t vanilla
1/4 t ground ginger
1 t cinnamon
1/2 t nutmeg
1/8 t cloves
Blend it in a blender or food processor, pour into parchment lined 10'' deep dish pie pan.
Bake for 60 minutes at 350 deg F, cool, refrigerate.
We eat this for breakfast, or dessert with some raspberry puree on top, or for snacking.
 
I use it on the wooden pizza peel to launch the pizza. Works better than flour.
I still want to try make rice noodles. I've done it before over a pot of boiling water, but I'm trying to find a different way. And dumplings

I think the bread normally used for banh mi contains rice flour as well
 
I've made rice noodles with rice flour I've made by grinding up jasmine rice. Surprisingly, as popular as jasmine rice is, and as flavorful as it is, I've never seen commercial jasmine rice flour. It was delicious, but I've only done it a couple of times.
 
I've made rice noodles with rice flour I've made by grinding up jasmine rice. Surprisingly, as popular as jasmine rice is, and as flavorful as it is, I've never seen commercial jasmine rice flour. It was delicious, but I've only done it a couple of times.
Interesting, I may try that, thanks. :)
 
I've made rice noodles with rice flour I've made by grinding up jasmine rice. Surprisingly, as popular as jasmine rice is, and as flavorful as it is, I've never seen commercial jasmine rice flour. It was delicious, but I've only done it a couple of times.
I have never made rice noodles. Could you give me a step by step or is it too much to write?

Also, does anyone know how glass noodles are made?
 
I've toasted jasmine rice and then ground for larb.
Tastes great and works well with other salads, but I think commercial rice flour is too fine to do something like that
 
I use it as a thickener. It reacts a bit different than corn starch. I can usually just pour it into my sauce dry and it mixes, unlike corn starch which can ball up.
 
Back
Top Bottom