Several questions about Top Butt Sirloin.

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Grits-N-Gravy

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I'm tryin to get a little restaurant open here in Orlando. Its gonna be a casual Southern style restaurant.

I plan to use Sirloin in several different ways, and was wondering:
* Can I get by with Select grade? My price point is low, so I'm looking to save some money, but not if theres a huge difference in quality.
* Along the same lines, what is the best way to tenderize the sirloin steak?

I have other questions, but I'll leave it there. any input would be appreciated, Thanks.
 

Uncle Bob

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Welocme to DC GNG...Make yourself at home.




Grits-N-Gravy said:
Can I get by with Select grade?


Yes! If you want to go out of business in 6 months. There is a difference between Select and Choice.



Grits-N-Gravy said:
Along the same lines, what is the best way to tenderize the sirloin steak?

If you buy Choice grade sirloin, and cook it properly, it really doesn't need tenderizing!

Good Luck with your venture!!
 

Grits-N-Gravy

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Welocme to DC GNG...Make yourself at home.







Yes! If you want to go out of business in 6 months. There is a difference between Select and Choice.





If you buy Choice grade sirloin, and cook it properly, it really doesn't need tenderizing!

Good Luck with your venture!!

Thanks, Unc.
I'm pretty familiar with the grading system. I was just wondering with a good marinade, If I couldn't make the Select work.
This Steakhouse I used to Manage, used a powder pack they would dilute in water, and dip the steaks in. They came out good.
I'm confident that Choice will be fine, but Lord knows Prime is out of my price range:(

With the cap muscle, I'm gonna cube it, and marinade em in Teryaki sauce and pineapple, and do K-Bobs.
Thanks again for your feedback.
 

Grits-N-Gravy

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Grade, and tendizing aside..

I am looking for as many ideas as I can get for usages for Sirloin. Currently I am doing:
*8oz steak
*Marinated K-bobs

Any other ideas would be appreciated. I will be cutting them myself, so I can do whatever.

Thanks!
 

Jeff G.

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Goulash.. shish-ka-bobs.. slice thin, grill with peppers onions and cheese(philly cheese steak sandwich)... Cut into cubes and a fine gourmet chili.. cut strips, roll with stuffing of some type and grill(pinwheel style)... Skewer thin strips and grill with with seasonings for an appetizer.. pound out and make Schnitzel out of them(OK, I know it isn't veal)... pound out with a tenderizer and have cube steaks, lots of dishes can be made with cube steaks... Sour Bratten..
Roast and cut thin for roast beef sandwiches...

Let your imagination roll..
 

jennyema

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Goulash.. shish-ka-bobs.. slice thin, grill with peppers onions and cheese(philly cheese steak sandwich)... Cut into cubes and a fine gourmet chili.. cut strips, roll with stuffing of some type and grill(pinwheel style)... Skewer thin strips and grill with with seasonings for an appetizer.. pound out and make Schnitzel out of them(OK, I know it isn't veal)... pound out with a tenderizer and have cube steaks, lots of dishes can be made with cube steaks... Sour Bratten..
Roast and cut thin for roast beef sandwiches...

Let your imagination roll..

But it's supposed to be a southern restaurant.
 

Jeff G.

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Southern.... missed that part. OK... serve grits with everything... still works!!! :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

Seriously, don't lock yourself in too tight. Especially as a first enterprise. Open the concept up a bit but serve REALLY GOOD FOOD. If you have good food, people will come regardless of the concept, or no concept.
 

Grits-N-Gravy

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But it's supposed to be a southern restaurant.
Thanks.

I was hoping for more southern style dishes.
Can I do Pot Roast from a Top Butt?
Can I season my blacks eyes with it?
Can I season my greens with the trim?

I'm just looking for fresh thinkin.

I apologize for not stating labor is the enemy. I gotta keep it real low, so any dish that requires a ton of labor, won't work.

Thanks again, for all ideas. More please.:)
 

Grits-N-Gravy

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Southern.... missed that part. OK... serve grits with everything... still works!!! :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

Seriously, don't lock yourself in too tight. Especially as a first enterprise. Open the concept up a bit but serve REALLY GOOD FOOD. If you have good food, people will come regardless of the concept, or no concept.
haha, Grits!!!
I am actually doing a cheese grits souffle.

I respect your take on "don't lock yourself in too tight", but I know my market. This place I'm lookin at is less than a mile from my house. Its in DT Orlando, but in a working class neighborhood. My price point is $8-$14. It's middle class, blue collar, and older folks with some $$ type demographic.
 

Constance

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In addition to the sirloin tips Uncle Bob suggested, and Aunt Dot's idea about chicken fried steak, you can also run some of the sirloin through a grinder and make some really good chopped steaks.
After you grind the meat, season with S&P and garlic powder, shape lightly into an oval patty, and cook as you would a steak. I often put a pat of butter on top while the bottom is browning.
If you serve it with a few sauteed fresh mushrooms on top, you can get more money out of it.
Add bread, baked potato and salad, and you've got a great entree.

If you want to serve sirloin steaks, you have to buy Choice. Otherwise, they'll be chewy, no matter what you do to them.

I do love to find a restaurant that offers a good sirloin steak, and if you learn how to cook a good one, you will get business, even if you have to charge a higher price.
 

Jeff G.

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Thanks.

I was hoping for more southern style dishes.
Can I do Pot Roast from a Top Butt?
Can I season my blacks eyes with it?
Can I season my greens with the trim?

I'm just looking for fresh thinkin.

I apologize for not stating labor is the enemy. I gotta keep it real low, so any dish that requires a ton of labor, won't work.

Thanks again, for all ideas. More please.:)

You should be able to a pot roast no problem. Seasoning black eyes...stick to pork, same with the greens.

How about chicken fried steak--Take pieces and run through the cuber(or beat with the a tenderizing mallet) Bread, then fry. Serve with dripping gravy and mashed potatoes...yummy...

I would about bet you could wrap medalions with bacon and grill. You might sprinkle a little Adolphs on first..

I would also try cutting it thin, spice rub with creole spices, cook on a hot skillet/griddle and serve on rice..

cut small steaks for steak and eggs.. a southern classic
 

jpmcgrew

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:) Maybe you could ask the locals what they would like to have at a restaurant or do a poll. You might be surprised about what they are craving.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Top sirloin is a fairly lean meat. It won't like to be well done. The meat will dry out and become tough. With top sirloin, cook to no more than medium rare, slice very thin, against the grain, and serve with a good gravy or aus-jus and mushrooms, onions, steamed carrots, etc. It would also be great searved over rice, or egg noodles.

Another dish that would fill your needs woud be any kind o creamed meat, made with a bechemel or even a velute'. Salads are another way of extendig the meat, again slice into thin strips after cookin medium rare and combine with good, leafy lettuce, cukes, sliced onion, sliced or whole black olives, and vine-ripened tomato slices. Throw in some nastutium blossoms for flavor and color.

Don't forget the charcoal or wood fired grill. It adds wonderful flavor. Fuel can be had from left-over cuttings in hardwood forests.

Chop, shred, or grind beef, add egg, sausage, bread crumbs, and spices to extend the meat.

Chuck from the shoulder provides many inexpensive cuts that work well braised, stewed, grilled, pan-fried, and roasted. Chuck roast is the cut of choice for pot roast and shredded beef. It can also be cubed for kabobs, or stuffed into fajitas, tacoes, or burritoes.

The sirloin you were talking about would make great carne asada beef, or even chili.

That should give you some food for thought, and for cooking.:LOL:

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
 

Dave Hutchins

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Des Moines Iowa
First before you open your restaurant run do not walk to the nearest Psychiatrist
and give him all of you money. then go sit under the bridge and relax and have positive thought about how lucky you are NOT to have opened a restaurant am a highly experienced Chef and once had the crazy to own my own restaurant. so I shelled out big bucks and bought one. little did I know that I had just forfeited all of my time to the
"" JOINT""never knowing if I would have enough money to pay the help,light and gas, Workman's comp, ssi payments, cost of food, and a million other things no body ever tells you about. Go out and talk to some restaurant owners and git there feed back.
being the owner and Chef of your own ""Joint "" is a real downer if the people do not come through your door more than once. Read Tony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential
He tells it exactlyu how it is. 4 out of every 5 restaurants fail with in five years.
 

Grits-N-Gravy

Assistant Cook
Joined
Feb 27, 2008
Messages
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Location
Orlando by way of Cabbagetown
First before you open your restaurant run do not walk to the nearest Psychiatrist
and give him all of you money. then go sit under the bridge and relax and have positive thought about how lucky you are NOT to have opened a restaurant am a highly experienced Chef and once had the crazy to own my own restaurant. so I shelled out big bucks and bought one. little did I know that I had just forfeited all of my time to the
"" JOINT""never knowing if I would have enough money to pay the help,light and gas, Workman's comp, ssi payments, cost of food, and a million other things no body ever tells you about. Go out and talk to some restaurant owners and git there feed back.
being the owner and Chef of your own ""Joint "" is a real downer if the people do not come through your door more than once. Read Tony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential
He tells it exactlyu how it is. 4 out of every 5 restaurants fail with in five years.
LOL.
Well, If I were a sane man, I wouldn't have been in this crazy business for 24 years.
I've made other folks a lot of money, and have decided I'd rather make it for myself.
I'm sorry your restaurant failed. You didn't know about "light and gas, workmans comp, FICA, cost of food..." before you opened the JOINT? That should have been in your P+L and projections.

I don't buy that whole "almost all restaurants fail" crap.(thats not direct at you personally, I've heard it 1000 times). Restaurants fail for very simple and avoidable reasons:
* People open Restaurants that don't know how to run them. see doctors, lawyers, etc.
*People try to do too much. The last owner of the restaurant I'm now looking at, had a 4 page menu. He sold everything from grits and eggs to pizza, calazones, burgers, and wings. He tried to be all things to all people. You gotta do a few things well, and aim at your demographic.
*People borrow in too deep. They drop $300+ to open a restaurant, and are hanging by a thread from day one. They do that, or under borrow, have 3 bad months and die.
* People that have never ran an entire restaurant (kitchen, bar, FOH, admin, negoiating purchasing contracts,training, etc.) think they can just figure it out. Its honestly taken me 20 years to be ready, but I can't tell ya how many FOH managers go off and open a restaurants only to be screwed by a KM and a Food Service Company.

Ive worked for 2 private owners. The first was my mentor. he started with 1 restaurant that cost him $25K to open. 5 years later he had 8 stores. He's a rich man today and he's only 45.
The other guy ran his restaurant like his personal playground. He "traded out" for everything, boats, car repairs etc. His restaurant his closed today.

I plan to open this restaurant with $20K (I have a partner, so it will be 40K total). I am going to be managing partner. I am gonna hire me a young guy thats hungry to learn the business. I'm gonna pay him fair, and train him.I then plan to give him the GM position and go open another one.
 
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