Tips for using your microwave

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GotGarlic

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I just learned some interesting ways to use the microwave, including softening butter without melting it. How do you use yours, other than for reheating?
 
I’m not very adventurous when it comes to microwave cooking.

I reheat/heat leftovers, canned soups, frozen meals, steam in bag vegetables, etc…

I also use it to soften ice cream, melt cheese on toast, and make popcorn in a covered Pyrex casserole.

I’ve experimented with cooking eggs, drying celery leaves, and cooking onions for French onion soup with mixed or uneven results.

In fairness, my microwave is over twenty five years old and I’m sure that the technology has improved.

I’m curious about the more recent multi function microwave ovens but not curious enough to buy one. 😉🤭😂

When my existing microwave finally dies I’ll probably replace it with a smaller inexpensive dorm room model.
 
I’m old enough to remember when the microwave was new, and all the rage!
Somewhere, turning to charcoal in my vintage cookbook collection is a recipe spruiking how to use the microwave to make a roast chicken (whole) that will be much better than using any conventional oven.
I was just a kid, but even then I was highly doubtful that you could make a roast chicken in a microwave.
I might go dig out that cookbook and try the “roast chicken” and report back!!
 
I’m old enough to remember when the microwave was new, and all the rage!
Somewhere, turning to charcoal in my vintage cookbook collection is a recipe spruiking how to use the microwave to make a roast chicken (whole) that will be much better than using any conventional oven.
I was just a kid, but even then I was highly doubtful that you could make a roast chicken in a microwave.
I might go dig out that cookbook and try the “roast chicken” and report back!!
Ooh, could be a waste of a perfectly good chicken Jade! (But I would be fascinated to see what happened if you tried it.)
 
I’m old enough to remember when the microwave was new, and all the rage!
Somewhere, turning to charcoal in my vintage cookbook collection is a recipe spruiking how to use the microwave to make a roast chicken (whole) that will be much better than using any conventional oven.
I was just a kid, but even then I was highly doubtful that you could make a roast chicken in a microwave.
I might go dig out that cookbook and try the “roast chicken” and report back!!

My dad was an early adopter of technology. He had a car phone in his company car in 1979. We had the first microwave oven in our neighborhood, an Amana Radarange. Half the neighborhood came over to see it boil water. :ROFLMAO:

CD
 
The only tip I have for a microwave is when you decide to toss it, save the plate. You never know when you'll need another plate and even if you don't want to use it someday, you can always sell it on eBay or at a garage sale.

I bought the cheapest microwave there is because 1) I'm cheap 2) I hate all the bells and whistles and don't want to read a tech manual to use mine and 3) it was yellow.

Naturally the plate just flat broke in half one day for no reason, but fortunately, I had a neighbor with a spare he wanted to get rid of.
 
The only tip I have for a microwave is when you decide to toss it, save the plate. You never know when you'll need another plate and even if you don't want to use it someday, you can always sell it on eBay or at a garage sale.

I bought the cheapest microwave there is because 1) I'm cheap 2) I hate all the bells and whistles and don't want to read a tech manual to use mine and 3) it was yellow.

Naturally the plate just flat broke in half one day for no reason, but fortunately, I had a neighbor with a spare he wanted to get rid of.
I was using a particularly rubbish new pair of rubber gloves to do the washing up a few weeks ago and, having cleaned the microwave plate, picked it up and it slipped out of my hands! (Luckily, back into the washing up bowl.) If it had fallen onto the floor, it would have smashed. So this may be a useful tip!

Several other things also slipped out of my hands with those rubber gloves, so they have been ditched!
 
I have two huge ceramic trays, from old huge micro/convection ovens. Our microwave/convection died last month after 30 some years, and within 2 hours I had a used Oster microwave off facebook marketplace. I'm thrilled with it. It's simple and does the job and takes up less space.
 
I use mine to steam vegetables. Just wrap them in wet paper towels, and nuke them a minute at a time until they are how you want them. This works especially well with asparagus.

CD
I need to try asparagus that way, thank you. Also corn in the husk is good in the microwave, its how we prefer it.
 
I need to try asparagus that way, thank you. Also corn in the husk is good in the microwave, its how we prefer it.

Yes, asparagus steamed in the microwave with wet paper towels renders hot asparagus that still has some decent crunch to it.

My favorite way to cook asparagus is quickly grilled over a hot fire, with a thin coating of olive oil, salt and pepper. But the microwave steam method is my second favorite.

I grew up eating canned asparagus that was then overcooked. Basically mush. I hated asparagus until I tasted it cooked properly. Now, I love it.

CD
 
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Corn in the microwave is the only way I'll do it now.
Love the "don't bother stripping the husk nor the silk. Add water inside husks, throw in micro. Cut off stem end, grab top with mitt and squeeze corn out. Completely and utterly clean of all silk, perfectly cooked"
Only drawback is you have no stem to hold, but then again, most people stick in one those holder thingies anyhow.
 
Yes, asparagus steamed in the microwave with wet paper towels renders hot asparagus that still has some decent crunch to it.

My favorite way to cook asparagus is quickly grilled over a hot fire, with a thin coating of olive oil, salt and pepper. But the microwave steam method is my second favorite.

I grew up eating canned asparagus that was then overcooked. Basically mush. I hated asparagus until I tasted it cooked properly. Now, I love it.

CD
I grew up refusing to eat that nasty canned asparagus. My mum didn't mind - more for her.

But, when I started cooking for myself, without using canned veggies, I discovered that most of them were much better tasting and had better texture when cooked from fresh. I had learned as a little kid that peas were a thousand times better raw or from fresh. So, the only hesitation I had about trying fresh asparagus was the price.
 
Corn in the microwave is the only way I'll do it now.
Love the "don't bother stripping the husk nor the silk. Add water inside husks, throw in micro. Cut off stem end, grab top with mitt and squeeze corn out. Completely and utterly clean of all silk, perfectly cooked"
Only drawback is you have no stem to hold, but then again, most people stick in one those holder thingies anyhow.
We do our corn in the microwave too. However, we don't add water. Just do about 3 minutes per ear and voila!
 
I remember we spoke about this before Andy, but I can't remember if you shuck your corn first? or just wrap in a damp paper towel after shucking, I remember someone else mentioned they used the towel thing for their corn.
I believe that's why I add the water into the corn husks - because this way the silk comes completely off with the husks - so easy, not a thread left.
 
I remember we spoke about this before Andy, but I can't remember if you shuck your corn first? or just wrap in a damp paper towel after shucking, I remember someone else mentioned they used the towel thing for their corn.
I believe that's why I add the water into the corn husks - because this way the silk comes completely off with the husks - so easy, not a thread left.
I just trim off some of the bottom end so the ear will fit in the microwave and go. No other prep needed. Cork with husk in the microwave and zap. Then I cut off the butt end and squeeze out the ear. We use those pronged corn holders you stick into the ends.
 
Our microwave is used like Aunt Bea's--I reheat/heat leftovers, canned soups, frozen meals, steam in bag vegetables, etc…
I am old school and enjoy smelling food cooking, stirring and checking food in a pot or pan, and being in the kitchen for however long it takes.
There are advantages to microwaves, and we have the simplest we could find, so there are features I'm missing but I don't much care.
 
Out of curiosity suggested by this thread, I am now madly scrambling through (one of) my boxes of old cookbooks looking for the hugely entertaining book about all things microwave.
I am certain that its very basis is that you can make ANYTHING better in the microwave!
As for how I use one?
I have at times used it for vegetables - diced carrots or celery or cauliflower.
Into a Pyrex dish with some water, cover with cling film and nuke for six minutes and you get “steamed” veg.
Outside that, it’s only used for defrosting things
 
Our microwave is used like Aunt Bea's--I reheat/heat leftovers, canned soups, frozen meals, steam in bag vegetables, etc…
I am old school and enjoy smelling food cooking, stirring and checking food in a pot or pan, and being in the kitchen for however long it takes.
There are advantages to microwaves, and we have the simplest we could find, so there are features I'm missing but I don't much care.

Microwave ovens are mostly a convenience, but they do some things better than conventional methods. As I mentioned before, my microwave oven is really good at steaming certain vegetables, like broccoli, cauliflower and asparagus. They do have a place in a home cook's kitchen.

CD
 
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