Tips for working with dough

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PA Baker

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I somehow got on the mailing list for the Land O' Lakes newsletter and this month they had a couple interesting tips from readers. I've used the heating pad tip before but never thought of chilling my counter before rolling out dough! Here they are:

Not your ordinary kitchen utensils
"Before rolling out dough for cookies or pies, I pre-chill my countertop with re-usable frozen ice packs. Just place some on the countertop for about 20 minutes and your dough will not stick -- I still use a small amount of flour on the rolling pin and countertop." -- Jean

"When I am in a hurry I put my dough for bread, rolls or pizza on a heating pad set on low to speed up the rising process. It works great!" -- Liz
 

choclatechef

Washing Up
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If you use a marble pastry surface, pre-chilling is not necessary. Marble stays cool.
 

Audeo

Head Chef
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I'm with choclatechef regarding the marble board. I do love mine. However, for those without one, this is a really neat trick! What a great idea!
 

PA Baker

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I envy you! :D A marble surface is on the wish list of my "someday" kitchen. Until then, I'll give the freezer packs a try!
 

buckytom

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can't you buy a piece of polished marble to act as a "cutting", or maybe i should say, a rolling board?
 

Audeo

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PA, I inherited a 4-foot by 2-foot slab from my great grandmother. How it has survived this long is a testament to how well she was revered and feared in my family! It sincerely takes four people to lift the thing onto the countertop or, more realistic, to remove the darned thing so that I can clean from time to time. Funny how that usually doesn't occur unless I'm irritated with someone in the family.... :twisted:

And bucky, the marble really needs to be at least half an inch thick, IMO, to offer the characteristics mentioned here. Mine is about an inch and a half in thickness, and takes a couple of batches of fudge to warm up sufficiently to offer any control of crystalization there, so I end up doing the opposite of this method (heating with heating pads on low) before candymaking. It sure works great for pastry on the fly, though!
 

choclatechef

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If it helps anybody, I found my 3 by 5 foot marble slab in a thrift shop. It is about 1 1/4 thick.

They were selling a marble topped dinette table and chairs. I bought it from them for $125, and gave the chairs and table base away. Placed on a low cabinet, it is a great surface -- large enough for even me to have plenty of room.

I could not have afforded a huge piece of marble new.
 

Psiguyy

Sous Chef
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Aug 24, 2004
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Chilled surfaces don't work so good in humid areas with lousy or no air conditioning.
 

WayneT

Washing Up
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Sep 23, 2004
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Australia
buckytom said:
can't you buy a piece of polished marble to act as a "cutting", or maybe i should say, a rolling board?

Bucky, it would have to be round or else it wouldn't roll. If not round It would have to be called a "no go" board.
 

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