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Old 09-13-2008, 09:36 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by stinemates View Post
This is American Kobe beef, the stuff imported from Japan has even more marbling.
Ah, it's American Wagyu. I was going to say that it doesn't have enough marbling to be Kobe from Japan. Where is it from? Snake River Farms?
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Old 09-13-2008, 10:19 PM   #12
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I only know where I buy it from. Bud's Custom Meats in Penngrove, Ca

It was sooooooooooooooooooo delicious :)
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Old 09-13-2008, 10:23 PM   #13
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I only know where I buy it from. Bud's Custom Meats in Penngrove, Ca

It was sooooooooooooooooooo delicious :)
Ah, cool. I did a quick search and it appears that they get their rib eyes from Oregon. They have several farms up there that produce wagyu.
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Old 09-14-2008, 09:20 AM   #14
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It is my understanding the true Kobe can only be imported from Japan. The cattle are raised and fed differently than here in the States and that makes the beef taste the way it does.
Your price of $24 per lb. is a good price. The steaks coming in from Japan are in the $35 to $45/lb range. I know my hubby and I paid $16.00 each for the 1/2 lb. burgers - ala carte. It was well worth it ONCE!
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Old 09-14-2008, 09:28 AM   #15
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Yes that is correct DQ. Kobe refers to the location. You can not have Kobe beef from the US just as you can not have champagne from anywhere other than the Champagne region of France. That does not mean that the steaks of sparkling wine will not be delicious of course.
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Old 09-14-2008, 10:47 AM   #16
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I lived in Japan for a year and had authentic Kobe beef a few times back when the Yen was fixed at 360 to the dollar (the good old days ). The meat had very good flavor but the largest distinguishing trait I remember was the tenderness. I'm a performance knife guy but the Kobe could have been cut with a butter knife, or spoon, maybe even a finger. I swear it. I wonder what would happen if you took a cut of meat like that and dry brined it as is being discussed in the "reverse sear ribeye" thread? It might be the world's greatest steak or a little pile of charcoal and pink mush....
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Old 09-14-2008, 11:10 AM   #17
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I can't imagine brining a Kobe rib eye. I think you'll end up with some pretty mushy steak. I don't eat rib eye steaks for that reason. I like a little chew to my steaks so I go with New York Strip. Frankly, I'm not sure beef is a meat you can brine. I see a lot written about bringing poultry and pork but never beef. Is this even done with good results?
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Old 09-14-2008, 11:11 AM   #18
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DQ, Buzz is talking about dry brining which is different from regular wet brining. Dry brining would would fine on this, or any, steak.
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Old 09-14-2008, 11:19 AM   #19
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Quote:
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I can't imagine brining a Kobe rib eye.
GB is correct. Dry brining is an entirely different animal. Dry aging + dry brining + reverse searing = the best steaks I've ever had. Too bad the supermarts don't carry dry aged beef but at least most butcher shops have it.

DramaQueen, lookie here.
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Old 09-14-2008, 11:37 AM   #20
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GB is correct. Dry brining is an entirely different animal. Dry aging + dry brining + reverse searing = the best steaks I've ever had. Too bad the supermarts don't carry dry aged beef but at least most butcher shops have it.

DramaQueen, lookie here.
Interesting. I guess I missed that. Now what is the purpose for the brine; to bring out the flavor or to tenderize the meat? Is this a special brine? Can or do you dry brine poultry and pork?
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