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Old 10-16-2008, 03:49 PM   #21
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You can add paprika to anything, curry as far as i am concern is only good in the garbage, I hate it, but that just me.
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Old 10-17-2008, 09:17 AM   #22
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Why not? Hot dogs I can understand, but burgers and pizza? How are English burgers and pizza different from American? And btw, there are lots of different kinds of both.

I was really talking about corporate food, McD, KFC and so on. They really are poor, IMHO. UK corporate food is just as bad, or is it just fast food in general the world over? quality pared to the bone for the sake of the bottom line. No, I've had some excellent 'street food' in some countries, where they realize quality sells. Not to mention fish and chips from small outlets. But getting back to ethnic (), most 'ethnic' food I've tasted outside the land of origin has been a pale imitation at best, and inedible at worst.
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Old 10-17-2008, 09:20 AM   #23
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You can add paprika to anything, curry as far as i am concern is only good in the garbage, I hate it, but that just me.
well, a billion Indians can't all be wrong, maybe you haven't tried the real deal, in good ole ethnic US of A.
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Old 10-17-2008, 04:53 PM   #24
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Please let's keep it friendly. We are each entitled to our opinions.

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Old 10-17-2008, 06:23 PM   #25
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I'm going to be super agreeable and not irritated.
One DCer said:
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"Ten spices should give you about 50 - 60 different dishes, enough to keep you interested for a year or two, and collecting more spices along the way will open up your choices even further. Try to look at regional dishes rather than the usual 'restaurant' types.
HTH"
So I'm going to get more spices then try lots of different combinations.
Then another DCer said:
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"My advice to you, Bliss, is not to experiment (this is where most people go wrong IMHO) get a very good recipe book on basic Indian food, and follow the instructions very carefully. HTH"
This is good advice for someone that hasn't had 40 years cooking experience. I think I get better advice here and by looking up recipes and techniques on the internet than buying books. I totally enjoy the differing opinions, and I might find out if I LIKE curry or maybe I don't LIKE curry.

What's not to like about paprika? I was reading a penzy's catalog this week and there were 9 different curry combinations and 3 different paprika mixes. I haven't invested in any yet, but, WOW, what a cool catalog! ~Bliss I'm a SA, believe that this is whatever acronym you like.
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Old 10-19-2008, 10:20 PM   #26
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I make my own curry spice blend, and have another brand, made in Trinidad, that I am quite fond of. It's a matter of personal taste. The problem with making your own curry is the keeping the ingredients fresh. I cook a lot, so it's not an issue with me, but if you don't use the ingredients often enuf, they can go stale on you.
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Old 10-20-2008, 12:41 AM   #27
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I had a lady from India that worked in my lab for about 5 years - and Usha taught me a lot about curry, or maybe I should say curries. What goes into the curry depends on region, and from family to family (she brought 3 curry dishes to a pot-luck lunch one time and they were totally different) - akin to Italian tomato sauces vary from one grandma to the next.

Now, what curry has to do with either McD or KFC beats the pants off me!
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Old 10-20-2008, 10:13 AM   #28
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combine the last two posts, and you have it in a nutshell, IMHO. 'Curry' is not one dish, but hundreds of different dishes, as in Italian dishes like pasta or rissotto. In India you would be hard put to find the word 'curry' on any menu, except those catering for the tourists. Therefore, unless you think 'curry' is just one dish, it means different (and appropriate) spicing for each dish.

If you think curry is one dish, and use one spice mix ('curry powder' to make it) then I would lump it in with McD and KFC as far as taste(!) and conception are concerned. As Michael points out, different dishes can taste totally different, but its not like the Italian tomato sauce example, there they are just variations on a theme, different Indian dishes would be more like the difference between a burger, deep fried meat, a pot roast, a stew, a braise, etc. with many variations between each one of those.

And to Blissful, even with 50 years of cooking experience, I am still learning about how to use spices. I recommend a book because the author should be well known (to produce recipes that work) and they know how they compare with other similar recipes. Too often, recipes pasted on forums and other web sites are not tested, they are historical documents of what happened when the cook cooked it. It is probably not optimized, and sometimes the cook hasn't really any idea of the processes involved.

IMHO, spicing is difficult to get right; following old recipes which have had maybe 100's of years to develop would be my suggestion, modern Indian recipes rely too much on added flavour rather than developed flavour, and suffer because of it. And if bliss doesn't like one 'curry' move on to another, there are several hundred kinds, and thousands of variations.

I recommend you look closely at a good Indian recipe book, see how different spices are used, and when they are added, and why using a 'curry powder' is a recipe for disaster, or at best, will be in the same league as McD and KFC.
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Old 10-23-2008, 12:55 PM   #29
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well, a billion Indians can't all be wrong, maybe you haven't tried the real deal, in good ole ethnic US of A.
well, billion Indians do not eat beef, but who cares, I still do not like curry.
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Old 10-23-2008, 02:21 PM   #30
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well, billion Indians do not eat beef, but who cares, I still do not like curry.
Which made me think....what do billions of Indians do? hmmm, well, they work on Dell's technical help and accounts receivable, I know, I talk with them all the time. I've never asked them about curry, maybe I should.
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Old 10-24-2008, 10:45 AM   #31
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it is true that beef is not eaten in most states, in fact only in Kerela is it freely available, but in the other states, for those who wish to eat meat (state depedent, but from 15% - 60% eat meat, though not necessarily every day) there is water buffalo. The commonest meat (other than fish) is goat, euphamistically called 'mutton'.

[its just 1 billion Indians]

one thing they do is eat Indian food, most of which is nutritious and healthy, not to mention the benefits some spices are said to offer.
Maybe Bliss should ask what the person he/she is talking to has/had for lunch, then he/she maybe more enlightened. I'll even supply a recipe for Bliss to try, but not one using curry powder

Namaste Blissful
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Old 10-24-2008, 11:29 AM   #32
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Well, they also eat pork and chicken but I still say who cares, i still do not like curry.
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Old 10-24-2008, 01:10 PM   #33
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Maybe Bliss should ask what the person he/she is talking to has/had for lunch, then he/she maybe more enlightened. I'll even supply a recipe for Bliss to try, but not one using curry powder
Namaste Blissful
This kind of made me chuckle! I like being mysterious-

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And to Blissful, even with 50 years of cooking experience, I am still learning about how to use spices.
Wow, you ARE old. Namaste Waaza

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Well, they also eat pork and chicken but I still say who cares, i still do not like curry.
So Charlie, are you saying:
I would not eat it in a box
I would not eat it with a fox
I would not eat it here or there
I would not eat it anywhere?
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Old 10-24-2008, 02:40 PM   #34
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Some strong sentiments for and against curry

I am Indian but I am not offended by Charlie, it's all about tastebuds. My husband does not like pasta and italian food in general. I tell him there is a lot more to italian food than just pasta but he does not care to explore.

I am more adventurous but then again I myself prefer Asian food - Thai, Chinese, Japanese and Indian over American food. I would prefer my simple dal and rice with pickle and fire roasted papad over the best gourmet meal in the world.

I think Indian food has a long way to go in US. There is good Indian food in New York, New Jersey, California and Chicago but it's not like U.K. I just got back from Denver and I found the Indian food terrible there and we went to an extremely popular restaurant that had a 5 star user rating.

Remember all Indian food is not curry and not all pungent but that's the general impression of people in US.

If you want to get a good book on authentic Indian cooking I recommend a book by Sanjeev Kapoor.
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Old 11-13-2008, 11:14 AM   #35
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I agree that "curry" is an acquired taste for many who didn't grow up with it. When I was 19 and a newlywed, I decided to try to make it. It was nauseating, and the trailer smelled of it for months. It was years before I tried it again; I was in my late twenties and had the Hawaiian version, the Thai, and the Indonesian versions and I loved them all. Then we went to Hong Kong. We had never really had Indian food, and we went to this little place in the basement of one of the multitude of skyscrapers, and simply put our fates in the hands of the maitre d'. We loved every dish presented to us and haven't looked back. I now have a curry plant brought in for the winter, and I brush it with my fingers every time I pass by for the lovely scent. To each his own.
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