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Old 04-28-2012, 04:21 AM   #1
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The stuff that filo/phylo dough is made of...

Is this the same thing as a pastry crust? Would it work for pigs in a blanket? I am in taiwan now, and have to go through the same gymnastics to find the tasty food stuffs that I like It might be possible to find the Pillsbury type doughs here...but I keep seeing frozen philo/filo dough on things, but the web gives it slightly different descriptions. I am hoping to find one product that can be used for PIB, simple tarts and also for chicken pot pie tops... I should just take a whole Saturday and spend it making crusts. I have always been intimated by crusts Has anyone seen a good, well filmed/produced video on this topic?

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Old 04-28-2012, 04:47 AM   #2
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I had some phyllo dough in the freezer. The first three solid ingredients were flour, water and vegetable oil. Phyllo dough is rolled very thin. VERY thin. Whereas, pastry dough contains pretty much the same ingredients, but not rolled out as thin. I am sure if you use more than one buttered sheet at a time, it should work for you. It will be very flaky and for a novice can be very difficult to work with.

Google "How to make piecrust" in You Tube. You will find many answers and different ways to make pie and pastry crusts. The secret to successful pie crusts is very cold ingredients including the bowl.

If you can find some Pillsbury biscuits in a can, you can roll them out to a thiness and use them for pigs in a blanket.

Every one has their problem food they have difficulty working with. For me, it is the pastry bag. Someday I will conquer my fear of that bag. Just like you will learn how to successfully make a pie crust.
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Old 04-28-2012, 05:53 AM   #3
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Personally, I like Biscuits on top of my chicken pot pies ( no bottom crust). That being said, Puff Paste works really well as a pie topper, and you can roll it thinner and use to line the pie pan first, if you want a bottom crust as well. Filo dough, I don't use except to make those little spinach/ cheese appetizers that are folded into triangles and brushed with melted butter before baking. I would buy both filo and puff paste pre made. ( I don't use either very often). In US, these products are in the freezer section of a grocery store.

As far as biscuits go, you can either make rolled out biscuits or drop the dough on top by the spoonful. Biscuit dough should be mixed lightly just until the dough holds together, then rolled out, again using light motions with the rolling pin. If making "drop" biscuits, add a bit more liquid than recipe calls for, and spoon it onto the top of whatever you are baking. If using biscuits on top of a chicken pot pie, have the pot pie ingredients hot and bubbling before placing the biscuits on top. This helps the undersides of the biscuits cook. Otherwise, they can turn out kind of soggy on the bottoms.

To make a decent pie crust use very cold butter/ fat/ lard cut into bits before working it into the flour mix. Crumble it with your fingers and then add very cold water one tablespoon at a time. Once it holds together, Shape it into a ball or two balls. Wrap and refrigerate 30 minutes before rolling it out on a lightly floured surface. When rolling out a pie crust, lightly flour the rolling pin, the work surface and the top of the dough ball. With the palm of your hand, Flatten it slightly, then from the Center roll it a little, give the dough a quarter turn sideways and roll again. Keep rolling and turning until it is all rolled out. (Turn the dough to the other side when it is about half rolled out). Then carefully roll it up loosely and transfer to the pie pan. If it tears, it is easily patched together by pressing the dough lightly with the fingers.

Type in YouTube dot com and in the search, put in Pie Crust.

Yes, you can use refrigerated ( store bought) biscuits successfully for Pigs in blankets too. If you are able to buy refrigerated biscuits, the store probaly has already made pie crusts too. The ingredients in biscuits or pie crust should not be too expensive, so it is worthwhile to experiment and attempt to make either one. Filo dough and puff pastry, can be a little more expensive, plus you have to find out if they are available where you live.

I say, give it a go and make a pie crust.
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Old 04-28-2012, 07:09 AM   #4
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Good Afternoon,

I love Greek regional cuisine and there are uncountable recipes using Phyllo savoury or sweet in style. Yes, this pastry dough can be wrapped with numerous types of products including pork.

This lovely product can be filled / wrapped with: spinach & Feta, pistachios & honey or walnuts & honey, almonds and / or hazel nuts and honey, Feta with tomato, Caprese: buffala di Mozzarella with tomato & basil ... Plus 100 + other ideas ...

Kind regards.
Margi.
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Old 04-28-2012, 08:18 AM   #5
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As others have already said, Phyllo dough is very versatile. You just have to keep in mind that after baking it's shatteringly crisp, which might make your Pigs-In-A-Blanket a little messy.
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Old 04-29-2012, 06:11 AM   #6
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Thanks! I will begin my investigation to find the things :)
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Old 04-29-2012, 09:48 PM   #7
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Fillo will not work its thin and crispy. Have you seen any puff pastry? That would work
Well
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Old 04-30-2012, 07:28 AM   #8
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But isn't puff pastry just as crisp? I buy it in sheets & as pre-formed "patty shells", & after baking it's just as crisp as Phyllo; just a bit denser.
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:23 AM   #9
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You are right. For Pigs In A Blankiet she needs either Pillsbury Crescent Rolls in a can rolled out thin, or pie crust rolled out also. With the pie crust she can roll it into a square and then cut triangles from it.
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:35 AM   #10
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The original recipe for Pigs In A Blanket came from the Pillsbury kitchen more than 40 years ago. The recipe called for crescent rolls, hot dogs and a slice of cheese. It was touted as a quick meal for the working mother.
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:17 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
The original recipe for Pigs In A Blanket came from the Pillsbury kitchen more than 40 years ago. The recipe called for crescent rolls, hot dogs and a slice of cheese. It was touted as a quick meal for the working mother.
I remember that! BTW, Pengyou is a he ;)
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:22 AM   #12
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We used to make pigs in blankets back in the 50s, that would be over 50 years ago. We made them at summer camp, etc. We used Pillsbury or Bisquick biscuits and didn't use cheese. Never heard of using cheese before. We would put them on sticks and roast them over a campfire like marshmallows.
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:55 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bacardi1
But isn't puff pastry just as crisp? I buy it in sheets & as pre-formed "patty shells", & after baking it's just as crisp as Phyllo; just a bit denser.
I don't know. It seems less messy to me but all these things would be delicious - FILO, puff pastry, pie dough, etc just some may be harder to eat. Perhaps just provide extra napkins
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Old 04-30-2012, 03:55 PM   #14
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Filo is, in my mind, similar to strudel dough. I've made both from scratch and recall having to hang the dough off the cupboard door and pull very gently. I only made each once--had to try doing it, but prefer to buy filo.
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Old 04-30-2012, 04:13 PM   #15
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The best pigs in the blanket I have made used a combination of white bread dough, using store-bought yeast, and sourdough that I made from scratch. Both should be easily available to you. Just roll the dough out after letting it rise one time, on a well-floured surface until it's about an eighth-inch thick. Place a line of hot-dogs on the rolled dough, and cut it after rolling a portion of the dough around the line of hot dogs. Cut between the dogs and pinch the ends together so the the hot dogs are completely encased. Place the next line of hot dogs down and repeat. Do this until all of the dough is used up. The encased hot dogs can be frozen for later use, or placed on a parchment lined cookie sheet to rise until doubled, then baked to a golden brown in a 350'F. oven.

If you are adventurous, you can lay down thin cheese slices, and strips of bacon to wrap around the hot dogs as they are rolled into the dough as well. It's all yummy. To serve, provide a butter knife so the eater can cut one end off of the bun, and squirt their favorite condiments inside.

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