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Old 09-19-2012, 02:27 PM   #1
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Problem with black spots on onions

I bought from 3 stores & everytime I get onions I find black mold spots in the first layer or two,sometimes 3rd layer too on every onion.I usually get sweet d's organic or vidalia.Both have had this black mold.I just been cutting those areas out & washing them off very thoroughly.Anyone run into this problem with onions often at stores?It irritates me very much

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Old 09-19-2012, 02:34 PM   #2
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The problem is in the dirt. Then they are washed before the are packed for sale. They are not always thoroughtly dry when they are packed so it gives the mold a chance to grow again. I too just cut them out and use the onion. I have never had a prblem doing this. Just continue to do what you have been doing. Cut out the spots and wash them thoroughly. If there are any unseen spores left, the heat of cooking will kill them.
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Old 09-19-2012, 02:49 PM   #3
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It happens. I just peel off the damaged layers and proceed.
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Old 09-19-2012, 03:43 PM   #4
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Like Andy says, it happens, and if that's the onion you're working with, well it's lucky they have layered dividers, so they can still be partially usable.

Speaking of Spots. My basil was starting to get black spots on some of the larger/ lower leaves. I cut the top halves of the plants and did a final marathon Pesto making over two days. I think I have about 40+ pkgs in the freezer from this summer's harvests.
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Old 09-19-2012, 03:56 PM   #5
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I agree with the others, I peel down until the onion is clean and free of mold.

This year I have found the same thing with a couple of cabbages.

I wish I could peel back a few layers!
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Old 10-02-2012, 01:35 PM   #6
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I buy organic red onions at Trader Joe's and rarely run into this problem. You must store the onions in a dark, cool place with good air circulation. Never refrigerate a dry onion unless you have cut it and have some left over. Also, it depends on the area where you live. If it is a humid area, there is a higher chance of mold. I also agree with the post above --- sometimes there is a fungus in the ground where onions are grown and it leads to mold on the onions, especially if they are not thoroughly dried. As others have said --- just peel off the layers and use the good parts of the onions. Onions are one of the best things you can eat!
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Old 10-02-2012, 02:06 PM   #7
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I buy organic red onions at Trader Joe's and rarely run into this problem. You must store the onions in a dark, cool place with good air circulation. Never refrigerate a dry onion unless you have cut it and have some left over. Also, it depends on the area where you live. If it is a humid area, there is a higher chance of mold. I also agree with the post above --- sometimes there is a fungus in the ground where onions are grown and it leads to mold on the onions, especially if they are not thoroughly dried. As others have said --- just peel off the layers and use the good parts of the onions. Onions are one of the best things you can eat!
I agree w/ Shelly re storing the onions. Have not encountered any black mold or spots.
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Old 10-02-2012, 03:15 PM   #8
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We store our onions in a hanging basket in our kitchen. They are subject to ambient light and the kitchen lights at night. We usually have at least one or two left when we go to the grocery, so they may hang for 7-10 days before getting used. Very rarely do we have a "mold" problem and it is usually in the outer layers that would be discarded anyway. I do notice that sometimes the onions in the grocery are cold, like they have been in cold storage. These are now out in the ambient store temperature. This seems to be when I most notice the "mold" issue.
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:50 AM   #9
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I store my onions in the fridge with no problems, have done it for years. And cold onions don't make you cry so much.

I keep them in their own crisper drawer. Don't put fruit in with them, unless you want a new taste sensation in your apple pie.
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:59 AM   #10
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I store my onions in the fridge with no problems, have done it for years. And cold onions don't make you cry so much.

I keep them in their own crisper drawer. Don't put fruit in with them, unless you want a new taste sensation in your apple pie.
That is the most recommended way to store them. Keep them in their original bag and give them their own crisper drawer. You can store other veggies with them, but be prepared for the taste to travel and enhance your celery. In the summer, I also store my potatoes in there. Keep them from sprouting eyes.
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Old 10-05-2012, 11:20 AM   #11
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I store my onions in the fridge with no problems, have done it for years. And cold onions don't make you cry so much.

I keep them in their own crisper drawer. Don't put fruit in with them, unless you want a new taste sensation in your apple pie.
I keep mine in the fridge too, though my mother didn't. I bought a 10 lb bag of boiler onions and didn't put them in the fridge, because the bag was too big. By the time I was half way through the bag of onions, most of them were soft and yucky.
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Old 10-05-2012, 11:47 AM   #12
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I keep mine in the fridge too, though my mother didn't. I bought a 10 lb bag of boiler onions and didn't put them in the fridge, because the bag was too big. By the time I was half way through the bag of onions, most of them were soft and yucky.
The next time take them out of the bag and just drop them in the crisper drawer. When they are in the bag, they are two,three layers high. Dropped in the drawer, they spread out to one,two layers. Then you can close the drawer.
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Old 10-05-2012, 12:04 PM   #13
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The next time take them out of the bag and just drop them in the crisper drawer. When they are in the bag, they are two,three layers high. Dropped in the drawer, they spread out to one,two layers. Then you can close the drawer.
That's a good idea, but even loose, I'm not sure that 10 lbs of little onions would have fit in the crisper. (They were more like 20-30 layers high). At $1.99 for the 10 lb bag, it's not a big loss - I just hate seeing food go to waste.
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Old 10-05-2012, 12:14 PM   #14
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That's a good idea, but even loose, I'm not sure that 10 lbs of little onions would have fit in the crisper. (They were more like 20-30 layers high). At $1.99 for the 10 lb bag, it's not a big loss - I just hate seeing food go to waste.
What doesn't fit in the drawer, slice and freeze them. Just like you get at the grocery store. They freeze very well. I slice my in big slices. Then if I need dice ones, I can dice them when I take them out of the freezer. Sometimes I want the sliced ones for liver. Sometimes I need diced for chowders.
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Old 10-05-2012, 12:17 PM   #15
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I keep mine in the fridge too, though my mother didn't. I bought a 10 lb bag of boiler onions and didn't put them in the fridge, because the bag was too big. By the time I was half way through the bag of onions, most of them were soft and yucky.
I had to laugh when I read this!

I just bought a 10 lb bag of boiler onions at the farmers market, I could not pass up all of those onions for only $4.00.

I should learn to just pay full price and be happy!

Now I am on an onion diet!
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Old 10-05-2012, 12:21 PM   #16
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Onions should be fine stored in a cellar/basement or other cool dry space. That's where early Americans stored them all winter long (hence the term root cellar-where root vegetables re stored). A garage in a cooler climate (such as Canada in October) would also be a good spot.
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Old 10-05-2012, 04:26 PM   #17
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Onions should be fine stored in a cellar/basement or other cool dry space. That's where early Americans stored them all winter long (hence the term root cellar-where root vegetables re stored). A garage in a cooler climate (such as Canada in October) would also be a good spot.
Homes down south are built on cement slabs. (Termintes) And most of them have a car port, no garage. On ranches in Texas, a lot of the homes do build a root cellar. They are far out and making a run to town just to pick up one or two items is not feasible. A trip to town is usually once a month.

Now I can't store any root veggies in the cellar. The only thing there, are the mechanical things like a furnace, hot water tanks, etc. Not feasible. So for folks like us use the fridge.
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Old 10-05-2012, 04:44 PM   #18
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I store mine in the fridge too. In the same crisper drawer as the apples! My apples taste just fine, as do my onions, no flavor transfer. The onions last a long time, and no mold. I'm also storing garlic in the fridge, no problems.
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Old 10-05-2012, 05:39 PM   #19
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Homes down south are built on cement slabs. (Termintes) And most of them have a car port, no garage. On ranches in Texas, a lot of the homes do build a root cellar. They are far out and making a run to town just to pick up one or two items is not feasible. A trip to town is usually once a month.

Now I can't store any root veggies in the cellar. The only thing there, are the mechanical things like a furnace, hot water tanks, etc. Not feasible. So for folks like us use the fridge.

I was responding to taxlady who lives in Canada
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Old 10-05-2012, 08:27 PM   #20
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Onions should be fine stored in a cellar/basement or other cool dry space. That's where early Americans stored them all winter long (hence the term root cellar-where root vegetables re stored). A garage in a cooler climate (such as Canada in October) would also be a good spot.
In the garage would be great, but it's a communal garage and we aren't supposed to leave anything but our cars in the garage. I think it's actually a city bylaw. I'm just as happy knowing that no one is storing dangerous chemicals in the garage, like old paint and paint remover.
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