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Old 03-25-2014, 08:06 PM   #21
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Absolutely true Taxlady, I was devastated to find that out. Making my own bread I always add powdered milk for extra nutrition. In the meanwhile my prvious discourse was a round about comment on the fat that separates from milk and whisking/zapping/buzzing can/could possible put it back together... unless you make butter
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Old 03-25-2014, 08:34 PM   #22
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You can buy milk in bags here too. Comes with free pitcher. You put the whole bag in the pitcher and the pitcher has this pinch st the top where you slide open side of bag. Much cheaper than regular milk.

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Old 03-26-2014, 07:06 AM   #23
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Thanks everyone, I put a cup of it in the freezer for a test, I will experiment later on to see how it worked out. But I think for now I will just buy as I need it and my husband will get really thick and rich milkshakes and rich mashed potatoes with the leftovers . Haven't heard any complaints from him.
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Old 03-26-2014, 09:34 AM   #24
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Thanks everyone, I put a cup of it in the freezer for a test, I will experiment later on to see how it worked out.
That's great! A real scientific experiment! Let us know.
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Old 03-26-2014, 05:08 PM   #25
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I think we are talking about different things here. Heavy cream is a liquid.
Yes, of course it is. In fat content it falls between our whipping cream and our double cream but not enough to matter in this context. It can be beaten (whipped) and piped or spooned onto things (or, as I said, frozen). I've seen American (and Canadian) cooks use it in this way on "Food Network" so I know it works.
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Old 03-26-2014, 05:12 PM   #26
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You can buy milk in bags here too. Comes with free pitcher. You put the whole bag in the pitcher and the pitcher has this pinch st the top where you slide open side of bag. Much cheaper than regular milk.

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But less eco-friendly than returnable glass bottles which still hang on over here. In addition, the milk that comes in our glass bottles was in a local cow yesterday as opposed to supermarkets' plastic flagons of milk which are about a week old when they hit the shelves, having travelled miles and miles. Oddly, because it's pasteurised as opposed to being UHT or sterilised, supermarket milk has a sell by date of up to 15 days hence, which I find very worrying. Basically, it means supermarkets' "fresh milk" is far from being fresh
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Old 03-26-2014, 05:52 PM   #27
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In addition, the milk that comes in our glass bottles was in a local cow yesterday
Is that true of ALL milk in GB or just in your area?

When I had my own laying hens I found that peeling hard cooked eggs using my fresh eggs was difficult---- came off in bits and pieces and a lot of whites attached no matter how long or how they were cooked. (Store-bought eggs peeled pretty consistently with large pieces and very little bits and pieces.)

I finally did a test and kept a dozen or more in the fridge. Then every few days I would take a couple out and hard-boil them---- always same pan, same way. Relying on memory it took about 2-3 weeks before I was able to peel them! I think more towards the 3 weeks time.

Plus they were orange, not pale yellow.

Something to do with the membrane separating from the shell.

So---- 'fresh eggs' in the grocery? Not so. Maybe it's different in GB.
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Old 03-26-2014, 07:40 PM   #28
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cav76, people in the egg/chicken enthusiasm line know quite well that it is extremely difficult to peel FRESH hard boiled eggs. Minimum 1 week but preferable 2, best at least 3 weeks old. But a good trick is to crack the shell all over then use a spoon to slide under the shell and lift off. You are right, as an egg ages, the air pocket increases in size and which helps the membrane separate.

Orange yolks are from the feed you give and/or they are free range and getting lots of greens. During winter months when my chickens are not running free and decimating my gardens I give them chopped cabbages/carrots/apples and whatever kitchen refuse I have.. and for anyone out there with a few chickens for eggs - be sure to cook your potato peels well or don't give them to the birds at all.

I also cook and feed back to the hens any eggs that are really soiled, cracked, frozen or when I worm them (10 days grace). Can't sell those! Well, actually I eat those when I worm them .... figure it could take care of whatever's inside me too, but i won't sell them.
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Old 03-28-2014, 01:51 PM   #29
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Back to milk. Mad Cook, we too have glass milk bottles, but mostly for organic milk, as far as I know. Regular milk is in cartoons or plastic bottles.
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Old 04-01-2014, 07:11 PM   #30
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Freezing heavy cream

We always have heavy cream in the fridge, but we travel a lot.
What I do if we're going to be gone more than a week or two is freeze it in ice cube trays and bag the cubes in zip-locks. If you need some for a sauce or gravy, just throw in a cube, or two, near the end of cooking, and stir it in. Works great for us.

We do the same thing with bacon fat and chicken fat from making stock. Also freeze some stock in ice cube trays when we make stock. Hmm--how about tomato paste. Usually need just a small amount at a time, and we never see the toothpaste tube type packaging locally.

WARNING! be sure to lable the bags
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Old 04-01-2014, 08:39 PM   #31
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Is that true of ALL milk in GB or just in your area?

When I had my own laying hens I found that peeling hard cooked eggs using my fresh eggs was difficult---- came off in bits and pieces and a lot of whites attached no matter how long or how they were cooked. (Store-bought eggs peeled pretty consistently with large pieces and very little bits and pieces.)

I finally did a test and kept a dozen or more in the fridge. Then every few days I would take a couple out and hard-boil them---- always same pan, same way. Relying on memory it took about 2-3 weeks before I was able to peel them! I think more towards the 3 weeks time.

Plus they were orange, not pale yellow.

Something to do with the membrane separating from the shell.

So---- 'fresh eggs' in the grocery? Not so. Maybe it's different in GB.
As far as I know you can get milk delivered in most parts of the country. If you live half way up a mountain in the back of beyond it may not be possible. One pint (ie 20 fl ounce) glass bottles are standard for doorstep milk although if you want larger sizes they tend to be plastic but not many delivery (wo)men supply them. My milk comes from one of several local farms within a radius of about 10 miles to a small central bottling plant 3 miles away. The bottles are returned and re-used several times and when they can't be re-used because they are damaged, etc they are recycled into more glass bottles. The ultimate in recyclability. The milk I get is pasteurised as very few dairies provide raw (untreated) milk these days. The doorstep deliveries are such a convenience and worth the penny a pint or so for the privilege. Some dairies also deliver bread, yoghourt, orange juice etc. Long live the milk man!

As for eggs, I read a while back that supermarket eggs are up to 3 weeks old before they lit the shelves. You crack one into the frying pan and the white runs all over the pan. Before I moved here I used to buy free range eggs from the stall in the market which belonged to the chicken farmer. They were nearly half the price of supermarket ones. Now I get them from a friend who keeps her own hens. I'm very tempted to have a couple of back garden chickens when I finally get things sorted out at this house.
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Old 04-02-2014, 06:36 AM   #32
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... freeze (cream) in ice cube trays and bag the cubes in zip-locks. If you need some for a sauce or gravy, just throw in a cube, or two, near the end of cooking, and stir it in.

We do the same thing with bacon fat and chicken fat from making stock. Also freeze some stock in ice cube trays when we make stock. Hmm--how about tomato paste. Usually need just a small amount at a time, and we never see the toothpaste tube type packaging locally.

WARNING! be sure to lable the bags
so true so true
so be sure the labels you use don't come off in the freezer!! I've learned to write directly on the sandwich zip bags.
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Old 04-02-2014, 07:01 AM   #33
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. One pint (ie 20 fl ounce)

Ahh... the English pint... tis a great thing for beer.
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Old 04-02-2014, 10:55 AM   #34
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Geez... if you are going to freeze a quart of cream, why not just make ice cream out of it?
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Old 04-02-2014, 11:10 AM   #35
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Even 3 weeks old supermarket eggs do not want to peel.
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