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Old 09-20-2008, 02:10 PM   #21
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ok quick question. must it be unbleached bread flour? I have regular bread flour and unbleached all purpose. I'll double check that but is it a must on the unbleached bread flour? TIA
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Old 09-20-2008, 02:13 PM   #22
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I don't think I've ever seen bleached bread flour. I'd be willing to bet that yours is unbleached.
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Old 09-20-2008, 02:29 PM   #23
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RussellKhan it says enriched bread flour, does that mean unbleached??
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Old 09-20-2008, 02:35 PM   #24
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Well, enriched does not imply that it wasn't bleached, but to my mind "bread flour" does. What brand is it? Also, check the ingredients list, it may say "unbleached" there.
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Old 09-20-2008, 02:38 PM   #25
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Russ it doesnt say anything about bleached or unbleached as far as i can see. I'm using pillsbury best bread flour enriched and it says great for bread machines.

This is it
http://www.pillsburybaking.com/produ...299&prodID=719

definitely not unbleached
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Old 09-20-2008, 02:49 PM   #26
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I just went over to the Pillsbury website and checked out their ingredient lists. The bread flour doesn't say it's unbleached anywhere, but their all purpose flour does mention in the ingredients that it is bleached. To me that implies that the bread flour is unbleached. That along with the fact that bread flour is a higher protein flour by definition and bleaching removes protein settles it, to my mind.
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Old 09-20-2008, 02:52 PM   #27
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I have made lots of bread,with the mixer, in a machine and some by hand. I thought when I first read your recipe the sugar content was a little high, but there are 6 cups of flour. I have found that bread flour makes a slightly softer, lighter loaf than all purpose, but I have used them both interchangebly. I haven't found that bleached/unbleached makes any difference. I have also found that a little dry milk powder helps also and several tbs in that recipe wouldn't hurt, it also tenderizes a loaf. I never knead before the 2nd rise. i dump out my dough and gently form it to shape then let rise. I often heat a big cup of water to boiling in my microwave then set the pans in there with the water to warm up,(after the water is done,leave cup in) they rise very nicely that way. have also set the pans in the garage where it is much warmer due to a/c in house. Have fun with your baking and don't be afraid to experiment. I have found it's only flour and water and we can make more if it flops.
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Old 09-20-2008, 02:53 PM   #28
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I was also looking over there and on the unbleached flour it says unbleached wheat and on the regular it says bleached wheat and on self rising it says enriched bleached wheat but on bread it just says wheat. LOL no idea, i'm confused. Thanks so much for trying to help me out, i'm guessing the bread flour would be fine. I guess i'll just need to try it.
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Old 09-20-2008, 03:05 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by debbie24 View Post
I guess i'll just need to try it.
Yes do. As Granniero said, it's just flour & water and you can always make more.
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Old 09-23-2008, 10:44 AM   #30
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JoeV i tried your bread that night and i'm sorry it took me so long to get back here with my results.

I like the bread alot, was it supposed to rise alot? It rose above the pan but didnt rise any more during baking. The crust is a bit too crusty for us, it was a bit hard and i think its the only thing i didnt like. I personally didnt mind it but the boys did not like it at all. I made grilled cheese sandwich with the bread and it was very good, minus the crust of course for the little ones. Overall i like the bread and i'm glad i tried it.

Thank you so much for the recipe.
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Old 09-23-2008, 11:30 AM   #31
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We've never had a problem with a heavy crust with that recipe. Of course, everyone's oven cooks a little bit differently, and yours may be on the warm side which would give a heavier crust. The test for doneness of bread is an internal temperature of 200-210 F. Whenever I make a new bread recipe, I set my timer for 10 minutes less and check the internal temp in 3-5 minute intervals. By doing this I can determine more closely the time required for that recipe in MY oven. For example, when making rolls with that recipe, I remove them precisely at 13 minutes. The crust is just golden at that point and the internal temp is 200 F or above.

It's funny how people seek out soft crust for their sandwich breads and then look for a crusty crust for their soups and Panini style sandwiches. It's all a process of experimentation to achieve your desired results. One trick for softening crust is to put it in a plastic bag after it's cooled. This traps any moisture inside the bag and softens the crust.

Good Luck!

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Old 09-23-2008, 12:15 PM   #32
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It definitely got softer after it cooled and i put it in a plastic bag but still tough. I have a therm in my oven because it does run hotter than the dial says so i always go by the therm in there. I really do need to get an internal temp therm, i just keep forgetting. I have 2 but they are not instant read and i never know if its accurate so i have to get an instant read one.

Anyway maybe i overkneaded it, would that make a tougher crust?
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Old 09-23-2008, 03:02 PM   #33
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Deb,

Since I've only been baking bread for about 6 months, I rely on a lot answers from veteran bakers and some excellent websites, DC being one of them. While trying to find the cause of a problem for a friend recently, I came across a troubleshooting guide to answer questions to some common problems. It also gives good information about ingredients, structure and baking of bread. The troubleshooting guide is at the bottom of the page.

Check it out and see if this helps answer questions that I don't have answers for. Of course, we can always rely on the many veteral professional and amateur bakers here on DC.

main

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