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Old 05-06-2020, 07:19 PM   #1
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Smile What about Flattops or Griddles? Any interest in taking about outdoor cooking here?

I see forums for outdoor grilling for just about every kind of outdoor grilling tool and smoker, but I do not see one for cooking on a flattop, griddle, blackstone, etc. Hoping to get some conversations and recipes going here....

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Old 05-06-2020, 07:31 PM   #2
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I see forums for outdoor grilling for just about every kind of outdoor grilling tool and smoker, but I do not see one for cooking on a flattop, griddle, blackstone, etc. Hoping to get some conversations and recipes going here....
Welcome to DC.

OK. You first.
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Old 05-06-2020, 10:49 PM   #3
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yes, tell us what you like to do with yours. We'll chie in with recipes, and techiques. Teh only difference between a Blackstone and a stove top griddle is the heat source, and that you're cooking outdoors. Also, the Blackstone has a sarge cooking surface, which makes it easier to cook larger amounts o food, say 5 grilled cheese sandwiches at a time instead of 2.

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Old 05-07-2020, 05:14 PM   #4
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They have been using those for decades in Australia. I can see where people in hotter climates, and larger families would use them but for me, it isn't worth the expense..They look cool, though..but, I already have enough ways to burn food...
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Old 05-07-2020, 06:12 PM   #5
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They have been using those for decades in Australia. I can see where people in hotter climates, and larger families would use them but for me, it isn't worth the expense..They look cool, though..but, I already have enough ways to burn food...
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Old 05-07-2020, 06:36 PM   #6
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Hi and welcome to Discuss Cooking

I have only used my flat griddle on the stovetop when making tortillas, English muffins or larger amounts of pancakes when having guests.

Why don't you start a thread on how you use it? You never know - with so many more people cooking at home during these times, you might start a new trend If there's enough interest, the mods might create a new forum for it.
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Old 05-08-2020, 11:45 AM   #7
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Welcome to DC

There are numerous cast iron forms, ranging from small ones that sit atop a burner or element to larger rectangular ones. There are even electric units of cast aluminum with teflon coatings as well.

I use one of these on my stove for small runs of pancakes or latke's.



If cooking on a campfire I can use one of these (called a spider) in the coals to invert the Dutch Oven lid onto to make a griddle.



Those electric griddles like this one are nice when cooking to produce volume or for a group. Generally teflon coated aluminum.



As a kid, my grandmother had this lovely kitchen range which had a griddle accessory that would sit to the side of the four burners. There was a plug that the griddle slid into and a knob to adjust the temperature.

I loved cooking on it and was making Crep Suzettes by the time I was 9. I also persuaded grandmother to buy loafs of Texas Toast bread so I could make French Toast. (I made egg nog and thickened it...after enjoying a glass...to use as my batter) Salmon cakes soon became a standard of mine.

Just as an aside.....this range also had something called a "Deep Well". Similar to a stock pot but the burner could be lowered about 12 inches and the aluminum pot sit flush with the surface of the range. It had a cover that fit tight and was suitable for anything for soups, stews, and deep frying. I was always making donuts in it and I think Salmon croquettes were about my last project. Then one day when I came to her house she was all excited and urged me to come in as she had something to show me. A new range. I was heart broken. LOL It didn't have any of those lovely features.

It was a Frigidair Flair range.

The silver handle in the gray panel is like a drawer and when pulled out will display four elements in a stainless cook top. Lovely thing to look at and
had one element that could be set to a specified temperature. The oven had a temperature setting with a probe to stick into the meat so it could assure
the temp in the center had been reached. (to what the gauge had been set at)
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Old 06-23-2020, 02:17 PM   #8
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I have a CI plancha/comal for my BGE. Haven't used it yet, but will this summer (summer lasts till tourist season, they are the only 2 seasons we have in SE Florida). I don't consider the use of a flat top as grilling.
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Old 06-23-2020, 03:24 PM   #9
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I have a flat top cast iron griddle in the center of my newer 4 burner gas range. The burner for it is oval, and to tell the truth, I've never used it. Although some would love it, it's too durn heavy for cleaning in the sink. I prefer to use my Al-Clad 11" square stove top griddle when needed. For the two of us, it's perfect for my Shrimp Cakes and grilled sandwiches.
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Old 06-23-2020, 04:14 PM   #10
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Kayelle, that's sad that it's too heavy to clean easily.
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Old 06-23-2020, 04:16 PM   #11
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I have a flat top cast iron griddle in the center of my newer 4 burner gas range. The burner for it is oval, and to tell the truth, I've never used it. Although some would love it, it's too durn heavy for cleaning in the sink. I prefer to use my Al-Clad 11" square stove top griddle when needed. For the two of us, it's perfect for my Shrimp Cakes and grilled sandwiches.
That's what a sous chef is for
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Old 06-23-2020, 04:38 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by RCJoe View Post
As a kid, my grandmother had this lovely kitchen range which had a griddle accessory that would sit to the side of the four burners. There was a plug that the griddle slid into and a knob to adjust the temperature.

Just as an aside.....this range also had something called a "Deep Well". Similar to a stock pot but the burner could be lowered about 12 inches and the aluminum pot sit flush with the surface of the range. It had a cover that fit tight and was suitable for anything for soups, stews, and deep frying. I was always making donuts in it and I think Salmon croquettes were about my last project. Then one day when I came to her house she was all excited and urged me to come in as she had something to show me. A new range. I was heart broken. LOL It didn't have any of those lovely features.
I would love to have the stove my mom had. Don't remember when it appeared nor where it went but it was just as you describe above.
The side that had the well, did it also have a second smaller oven below it?

Loved that stove. Was a little relieved when we got it as it meant I no longer singed my eyebrows off lighting the gas stove. An occurrence every time I lit it.
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Old 06-23-2020, 05:52 PM   #13
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Yes, there was a second slide out to the left but I don't know if it was an oven or just a storage compartment. She always seemed to keep rolls of foil, plastic wrap, wax paper and the like in it. I'm guessing it was for pots and pans.

But that griddle.....made my Saturday mornings staying with her on the week ends. She just couldn't understand how I knew anything about Crepe Suzettes,
Latkes, and creations I wanted to replicate that I'd tried at sandwich shops and those were cooked on a griddle. The "hot dog special" being the most baffling to her. (where'd the kid ever come up with this ??)

I sit beside a girl in Jr High School who had a "Home Economics" class where they were cooking many of these things. (today it is "Family Consumer Science")
But that griddle really launched me into wanting to learn to cook.
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Old 06-23-2020, 08:31 PM   #14
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I have a rectangular cast iron one that was my Grandmother's. It is made to span two burners. It is perfect for pancakes and French toast!!
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Old 06-23-2020, 08:45 PM   #15
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Welcome to DC.

I have a round CI griddle like RC Joe shows in his first photo. That gets used a lot, and is good for making home made hash browns among other things. I also have a double/ two burner size CI griddle, smooth on one side, raised gridlines on the other. Seldom gets used. DIL uses hers frequently for weekend breakfasts. i have a flat top porcelain perforated grill pan (about 12x12) for the Weber, it's good for sliding smaller sized pizzas into the oven, but pizza outdoors is direct on the grill. i used that until I discovered a bowl shaped perforated pan for the grill, which is much preferred.

I think one comparison between grilling and flat top cooking is does one prefer burgers on a flat top like at a cafe/ diner/bar vs grilled. Both make tasty burgers, but I can't say one is inherently better than the other.

I think if I lived in a warmer climate, I might do more outdoor cooking, not just grilling. Did'nt people used to have "summer kitchens", and what were they like? (Maybe rhetorical, not wish to skew the conversation.)
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