"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Sauces, Marinades, Rubs > Sauces
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-04-2015, 09:24 AM   #1
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,456
Makin' Gravy

Yesterday during my mega shopping for the month, I ran into a lovely older southern lady.

She passed on a tip for making gravies. She said she takes flour and puts it in a cast iron skillet and places it in the oven at a low temperature until the flour gets to the color she likes to use and then keeps it in a container until she is ready to make gravy.

I didn't get any more information than that, but it soundedl like a great way to make gravy or even as a roux starter, so I thought I'd pass the idea along.

If I'm lucky enough to run into her again, I'll definitely try to get more details.

In the meantime, I'm going to try the idea out.

I love the idea of having "toasted" flour to make gravies and roux.
__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 09:36 AM   #2
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,610
I have heard of it, never tried it.

This is a pretty straight forward description of how to toast the flour.

Browned Flour Recipe | MyRecipes.com

Good luck!
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 09:54 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
creative's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: UK
Posts: 1,521
Question

Would this method be any better than mixing flour into the fat (after draining off the meat juices) and cooking it out until it darkens before adding the liquid?
__________________
"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt" (Charles M. Shulz)
creative is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 10:15 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 4,678
First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 10:32 AM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 25,042
Great idea, Z! Will have to give it a try.
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 10:38 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,355
Quote:
Originally Posted by creative View Post
Would this method be any better than mixing flour into the fat (after draining off the meat juices) and cooking it out until it darkens before adding the liquid?
If you make it in advance, it saves some time when you go to make the gravy.

You can also make roux in advance and freeze it. Restaurants do that all the time.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 10:41 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.
Here in my part of the South, turkey and beef gravy made with a browned roux are not uncommon. By definition, white or milk gravy isn't made with browned flour, but that's not the only gravy Southerners make. See: Gumbo.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 10:47 AM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.
And in rebuttal I have know a lot of southern ladies that made brown gravy for their chicken fried steak. Why would I want a white gravy for a piece of beef?
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 10:54 AM   #9
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,724
I've seen recipe for making a roux that start with browning the flour like this then mixing it with the oil and cooking it briefly. A simpler way to make a roux.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 10:54 AM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.
So are you saying all the recipes that have been posted in this forum are just crap? Considering that is such a broad statement, does that include all of the members of this forum?

I have been feeding a family for 60 years. They are all still alive and kicking. I do know what a stove is and I know enough to know the difference between the hardware store and a supermarket. I don't shop for food at a hardware store. I don't have any food left from my shopping forays at the supermarket 60 years ago. So I must have done something right. No one died from my cooking or even got sick.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 11:18 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,456
I really liked her idea because of the simplicity of making a quick but delicious gravy.

She mentioned her daughter coming over for dinner often, but the daughter wanted her to buy gravy mix packets.

I can see why she'd rather have toasted flour on hand.

A head start on roux came immediately to mind.
__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 11:39 AM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
I really liked her idea because of the simplicity of making a quick but delicious gravy.

She mentioned her daughter coming over for dinner often, but the daughter wanted her to buy gravy mix packets.

I can see why she'd rather have toasted flour on hand.

A head start on roux came immediately to mind.
I would add water or even milk to the flour for a slurry to add to the juices and liquid in the pan.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 12:39 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I would add water or even milk to the flour for a slurry to add to the juices and liquid in the pan.
Exactly!
__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 12:42 PM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Zhizara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 12,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.
If you want to learn about Souther cooking, maybe you should make an effort to meet more Southern ladies. They are the ones who know how to really cook!
__________________

If you can't see the bright side of life, polish the dull side.
Zhizara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 12:48 PM   #15
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 47,724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
First things first. I know of no "Southern Ladies" that brown the flour or even use brown gravy. LOL.
Here in the south its white gravy with the occasional sausage added and poured over biscuits.
I take anything I hear here very lightly as I have met very few people that actually know how to cook.

After reading this post, I take what you say about the south lightly. You can't make a gumbo without a roux, which requires browning flour.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 01:00 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 14,766
OK, just to lighten the mood a bit about browning flour in an iron skillet, I have another take on the subject.

When I was a new mom, my sweet southern grandmother told me to brown up some flour in an iron skillet to cure my baby's diaper rash. It worked like a charm when no fancy medicines had. I floured up his little bum with that browned flour and he was cured in a couple of days. Maybe it had something to do with it being browned in an iron skillet.

Anyway, carry on......
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 01:01 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
So are you saying all the recipes that have been posted in this forum are just crap? Considering that is such a broad statement, does that include all of the members of this forum?
I think he meant "here" in his area of the South.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 01:07 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
After reading this post, I take what you say about the south lightly. You can't make a gumbo without a roux, which requires browning flour.
Same here. RB, you continually speak as if where you are and who you know are the be-all end-all of Southern cooking. I think your experience with Southern cooks is very limited and it's unfortunate that you've generalized that experience to everyone in the South.

The South includes 16 states, not just South Carolina, or your little corner of South Carolina.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 02:00 PM   #19
Executive Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Same here. RB, you continually speak as if where you are and who you know are the be-all end-all of Southern cooking. I think your experience with Southern cooks is very limited and it's unfortunate that you've generalized that experience to everyone in the South.

The South includes 16 states, not just South Carolina, or your little corner of South Carolina.
Heck, even certain items vary just from area to area within the same state. I've read discussions on barbecue in the Carolinas and folks in one part of a state are adamant that folks in the next county are doing it all wrong.

If there can be that much variability within a state, then how much variety must there be when crossing state lines?
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 02:04 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 25,440
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
One of the reasons to make a roux instead of just adding flour is because the raw taste of the flour gets cooked out more quickly in a roux than in something water based. Fat gets to a higher temperature than water, when using a skillet. If you brown the flour in the oven, then it gets rid of the raw taste. Then, you can use it in a slurry without having to cook the gravy for a long time to get rid of that raw taste. I think it is a very clever idea, especially if you are try to cut down on fats.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
flour. gravy, gravy, other, roux

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.